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  • Phytic acid

    Okay, I checked up the wiki page for this and it has the following:

    Food sources of Phytic Acid

    Sesame seeds flour
    Brazil nuts
    Almonds
    Tofu
    Linseed
    Oat Meal
    Beans, pinto
    Soy protein concentrate
    Soybeans
    Corn
    Peanuts
    Wheat flour
    Wheat
    Soy beverage
    Oat
    Wheat germ
    Whole wheat bread
    Brown rice
    Polished rice
    Chickpeas
    Lentils

    Of the above foods, I eat brazil nuts and almonds. Actually I eat quite a lot of almonds. Should I consider removing them from my diet or am I taking it up all wrong?

  • #2
    The wikipedia article also says that lactobacilli and other gut flora provide phytase to break it down, though it doesn't say how much is produced. 1.35-3.22 percent of dry weight (almonds) is much higher than wheat too.

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    • #3
      I know, which has me confused!

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      • #4
        Soaking almonds and nuts in general helps to remove/deactivate at least some of the phytic acid.

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        • #5
          But then could you not just say the same about some grains? I thought one of the big things with the anti-grain stance was that they contained anti-nutrients?

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          • #6
            Yes, soaking/fermeting grains does lower the antinutrient level just as it does with nuts. I believe that most nuts though are higher in vitamins/minerals/beneficial stuff than most grains. Also they are much lower in carbohydrates of course. And most people consume nuts in small enough quantities that the antinutrients are not really an issue, especially if they have been soaked. The same can't be said of grains.

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            • #7
              You're definitely right to be concerned. I believe Mark has actually gone over this in the past, along with a few other internet paleo personas. The general consensus I believe is that you shouldn't be using nuts or seeds as a primary dietary fuel. While they do contain phytic acid which can cut down a bit on your nutrient absorption they are also high in fat while only having a minimal amount of carbohydrates. This differentiates them quite significantly from the grain/legume as well as the fact that the grains/legumes can contain many other hazardous compounds more detrimental than just their phytic acid content.

              Considering they are a seasonal type food (not produced naturally year round) it's probably best to stick to eating them in such a fashion.
              "You can demonstrate the purpose and limits of human digestion with a simple experiment: eat a steak with some whole corn kernels, and see what comes out the other end. It won’t be the steak."
              -J.Stanton

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ProtoAlex View Post
                You're definitely right to be concerned. I believe Mark has actually gone over this in the past, along with a few other internet paleo personas. The general consensus I believe is that you shouldn't be using nuts or seeds as a primary dietary fuel. While they do contain phytic acid which can cut down a bit on your nutrient absorption they are also high in fat while only having a minimal amount of carbohydrates. This differentiates them quite significantly from the grain/legume as well as the fact that the grains/legumes can contain many other hazardous compounds more detrimental than just their phytic acid content.

                Considering they are a seasonal type food (not produced naturally year round) it's probably best to stick to eating them in such a fashion.
                +1

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