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Einkorn Grain the ancient miracle food

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  • Einkorn Grain the ancient miracle food

    I first came across this ancient grain when I read Dr. William Davis’ blog, “The Heart Scan Blog”. To make a short story long... he promotes cutting grain out of your diet to keep your circulatory system running.
    Dr. Davis used Einkorn flour to make bread. He then tested the einkorn bread vs. normal bread.

    He was shocked by the results. From his blog dated June 13, 2010:
    Einkorn wheat bread:
    Blood sugar pre: 84 mg/dl (4.67 mmol/L)
    Blood sugar post: 110 mg/dl (6.11 mmol/L)
    Convention wheat bread:
    Blood sugar pre: 84 mg/dl (4.67 mmol/L)
    Blood sugar post: 167 mg/dl (9.28 mmol/L)
    With type II diabetes being such a common situation I followed this subject up. I’ve a friend with type II diabetes who agreed to test Einkorn bread. Our test isn’t under clinical controlled situations. We tried to reproduce the same circumstances to the best to our abilities. It is a real life situation… and that means a lot when it comes to practical use. The slice of white bread weighted 1 ounce. We measured 1 ounce of the Einkorn bread to keep the comparison similar.
    Einkorn wheat bread:
    Blood sugar pre: 154.8 mg/dl (8.6 mmol/L)
    Blood sugar post: 160.2 mg/dl (8.9 mmol/L)
    Convention wheat bread:
    Blood sugar pre: 149.4 mg/dl (8.3 mmol/L)
    Blood sugar post: 190.8 mg/dl (10.6 mmol/L)

    I'm not about to suggest this back into your diet. I'm suggesting that if you are going to have a grain as part of your 20% rule then this might be worth considering.
    Last edited by Vick; 11-22-2010, 04:29 PM.

  • #2
    So this is a wheat type? How about gluten?
    "Trust me, you will soon enter a magical land full of delicious steakflowers, with butterbacons fluttering around over the extremely rompable grass and hillsides."

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    • #3
      It appears it may be less reactive for a celiac, but still has some of the gluten protein in it.
      Meghan

      My MDA journal

      Primal Ponderings- my blog- finally added some food pron :P

      And best of all my Body Fat Makeover!!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jenny View Post
        So this is a wheat type? How about gluten?
        It's an ancient wheat.

        http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/20...-of-wheat.html

        What we call wheat today is quite different from the wheat of Biblical times. Emmer and einkorn wheat were the original grains harvested from wild growths, then cultivated. Triticum aestivum, the natural hybrid of emmer and goatgrass, also entered the picture, gradually replacing emmer and einkorn.

        The 25,000+ wheat strains now populating the farmlands of the world are considerably different from the bread wheat of Egyptians, different in gluten content, different in gluten structure, different in dozens of other non-gluten proteins, different in carbohydrate content. Modern wheat has been hybridized, introgressed, and back-bred to increase yield, make a shorter stalk in order to hold up to greater seed yield, along with many other characteristics. Much of the genetic work to create modern wheat strains are well-intended to feed the world, as well as to provide patent-protected seeds for agribusiness.

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        • #5
          Here's more.

          http://www.petitepeautre.com/presentationa.html

          For thousands of years, the story of Einkorn has been
          very closely linked to the mediterranean civilisation.
          The earliest evidence of Einkorn was in the 9th
          millennium BC.

          Very common until the roman period, it was then
          abandoned, as wheat had better yield. Einkorn was
          rediscovered only 15 years ago.

          It is a hardy plant; it grows on poor soils, in rude climates and it requires few fertilizers, little water and no pesticides. It takes 11 months to grow, sown in September it is harvested in August.

          Its productivity is low as there has not been any artificial selection (10 to 15 quintals per hectare). Because of tough glumes that tightly enclose the grains, it is difficult to hull it.

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          • #6
            Hmm. Well, just being ancient isn't enough to get me eating it... I'm doing some searching now and found some interesting links:
            http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/20...ibusiness.html
            Higher protein than most wheat, some suggestions that the gluten is less aggravating than regular wheat. (Although to me, considering most people don't consider gluten as aggravating as it apparently really is, not sure how to judge that...)
            "Trust me, you will soon enter a magical land full of delicious steakflowers, with butterbacons fluttering around over the extremely rompable grass and hillsides."

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