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  • Too much fish?

    Hi all,

    Just a quick question for you:

    I consume a can of oily fish (usually salmon or sardines - buying fresh would be too expensive for me at the moment and I like the fact that the bones are easily edible and nutritious) about five days a week and I have a portion (in the range of roughly 100-200grams) of white fish or shellfish, everyday. On the days I don't have a can of oily fish I have a portion of non-oily fish instead. Such as pollock, cod, whiting, prawns, scallops etc. I try to only eat wild caught or organic seafood for obvious reasons. And I choose seasonfood least effected by biomagnification.

    Due to concerns over protein intake (I consume very-roughly 100 grams per day) and the fact that I love seafood, I'm thinking of adding in another 100-200 gram portion of non-oily fish, each day...

    So, does it sound like I eat too much fish? (I know I'm probably being over cautious but all the talk of mercury, PCBs, dioxins etc can be worrying, especially for people who know that 'health is wealth').

    To sum up, per week:

    -Five cans of oily fish
    -Nine 100-200 gram portions of non-oily fish from the lower end of the food chain
    -Considering adding a second 100-200 gram portion of non-oily fish each day

    Thanks in advance and apologies for my first contribution to a great forum being such a long question,

    Daniel x

    P.S. Regarding protein alternatives, I don't eat meat and I dislike eggs hugely (apart from cheat days, ice-cream is great).

  • #2
    Per week:

    -Five cans of oily fish
    -Nine 100-200 gram portions of non-oily fish from the lower end of the food chain
    -Considering adding a second 100-200 gram portion of non-oily fish each day

    Too much fish?

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    • #3
      it's fine. see my 'google docs' link below. I have a 'safe fish' thing. From a toxicity perspective, only a few things are problematic: whale, shark, king mackeral, tilefish and maybe swordfish....just the really big guys that live a long time.

      Tuna, sardines etc are fine from a health perspective. Sardines are fine from an environmental perspective as are troll or poll caught tuna. Purse-seine and long line tuna are environmentally problematic.



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      • #4
        The only thing I'd wonder about actually is your omega 6:3 ratio. Since you only eat fish (no meat no eggs) and you eat a whole lot of it, you may in fact be getting more omega 3 fatty acids than you are omega 6 and I'm not sure that's the best thing to do. Perhaps someone with more knowledge in such things can provide some input.

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        • #5
          I'm bumping this thread both for the OP and my own education because I would really like to hear some input on this. Is there a drawback to getting too much Omega-3 fatty acids? If the only meat one eats is fatty fish is there a danger there?

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          • #6
            I'm with you on this dannyboy - I eat as much fish and seafood as you and have been doing for over a year. I don't know if it's doing me any harm, but at least if I'm doomed, we're doomed together The omega 3 thing is an interesting question, but without testing I'm not sure how you'd know. Inability to clot properly perhaps?
            My primal journal
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            • #7
              I have read somewhere respectable (sorry, I'm having my usual problems remembering where) that the selenium content in fish blocks the absorption of mercury anyway, so it isn't actually a problem. And if you concentrate mainly on the smaller fish, that's another reason not to be worried.

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              • #8
                I had similar concerns and, through a lot of research, found canned herring to be an ideal constant source of fish nutrients. Lower amounts of toxins in it because it is a smallish fish that eats mainly tiny prey, so the bio-accumulation of poisons up the food chain is minimal. And it comes with the fins and skin on it. I eat one can every day. But I also eat eggs and uncured (organic, no additives, etc.) sausages as well to round it out.

                If I'm wrong, say so! But at last examination, canned herring passed the test.
                Last edited by Knifegill; 10-29-2010, 02:11 PM. Reason: added text
                Crohn's, doing SCD

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                • #9
                  Add me to the list of fisheaters. I eat 2 cans of sardines almost daily, and about 200 grams of salmon about three times a week. Cheap and good.

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                  • #10
                    I've officially given up fish. It got to the point where I was eating anything up to 10, 3.5oz, mackerel fillets a day (at 360kcals each! ) and still feeling hungry enough to eat a couple tins of sardines and a tin of tuna (plus whatever else I felt like - usually Fage! )) I knew it was time to quit!

                    I've come to the conclusion that NO fish satiates me.
                    La tristesse durera toujours...

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                    • #11
                      Sorry, but what have calories got to do with it? If protein and fat (mackerel) don't satiate you, what does? (Rhetorical)
                      My primal journal
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                      • #12
                        This all sounds very fishy to me ;--))

                        Grizz

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                        • #13
                          I see no problem eating "from the sea". Of course, watch the shell fish. Even 'wild caught' might have been at the outlet of a sewer. That is where they find a lot of nutrients that they like. Not really the things we want in our bodies.
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                          • #14
                            You could always input what you are eating into nutritiondata.com and see what your omega 3mega 6 ratio is like. Then maybe add a few foods w/ omega 6s (nuts/seeds are a really great source of these, and the omega 6s in them can add up FAST!)
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                            • #15
                              Do it. As long as you are not eating top predators, you should be fine.

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