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How primal are your kids?

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  • How primal are your kids?



    My kids (ages 5.5 and 9) are semi-primal but they still like their mac & cheese. Luckily, they were never on much sugar. How do I nudge them into more primalness? They're both quite stubborn...


  • #2
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    at home, my son 21mths does well but when he goes with other people... not at all. They give him crap... but he's probably following the 80% rule

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    • #3
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      My kids were doing really well when they were quite small. But defintely, the more they're out in the world the more "dangerous" it becomes for them diet-wise! It got really bad here when they hit 3.5/4 years old - about the time they really start to differentiate between you/them.

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      • #4
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        My son is 3 years old and is mostly primal. The toughie is that he eats what we eat at home, but my mother-in-law feeds him all sorts of stuff at her house (mostly pasta, crackers and popsicles!). She thinks we don't know, but now that he's older he rats her out all the time!


        The toughest thing to get him to do now is eat his veggies. He used to eat literally everything I put in front of him but that all stopped at toddlerhood. Now I sneak broccoli into his smoothies and bribe him with Hot Wheels cars for at least trying something. I know some parents have a problem with "forcing" or bribing their kids to eat certain foods but I have found that sometimes he's pleasantly surprised by something I've made him try and he ends up liking it.


        From what I've read, at this age their tastebuds still aren't developed. So many foods, especially veggies, taste bitter to them, hence the inclination toward sweeter foods. So kids don't really grow out of picky eating, their tastebuds just grow into being able to appreciate a more diverse offering.

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        • #5
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          That totally makes sense about the taste buds. When my older daughter turned about 6.5/7 she began eating all kinds of stuff she wouldn't before. Some people's bitter recepters on their tongues are very sensitive to that flavor. My husband can't eat broccoli rabe, among other bitter veg, it's just too bitter for him. I wondered if my daughter inherited that from him. She still doesn't like a lot of veggies, but it's usually the more bitter ones.

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          • #6
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            My two are in college - the girl is making an effort to work on exercise and eating healthy. I keep sending her articles to show that what she can eat being Primal and hopefully her previous nutrition classwork will click. She doing better on more veggies, but I think the bread thing and those @#$% coffeesque drinks at the local shoppe will get her. Her one roommate loves to cook, so since they like to try new things - this might actually go over.


            My son could pass for a caveman...albeit a LARGE one. When he's on campus and walking, he does much better for exercise. Otherwise, he's a total computer geek and can sit still like a scared bunny working online for hours. I will keep sending him things as well and I hope to get him more Primal over Christmas break. He loves his granola bars so I'll need to find a good primal recipe for that.


            SO's two kids - 12 and 8 - they are the challenge. Pre bed snacking has been a habit and that's hard to break when they're "going to starve" two hours after dinner. So is guiding them to the understanding that jelly is NOT a fruit, and fruit cereal bars are just big cookies. I even got the lip of "a bagel is healthy"...well, no, it's 6 pieces of bread, and when you slather it with a 1/4" of cream cheese, you've consumed about 400 calories...and you're still not full. I know we grownups will all get smarter again in another 10 years or so, but in the meantime, we're moving slowly and picking up heavy things (like that bagel with cream cheese).

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            • #7
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              You know, I homeschool my kids and one of the reasons (among they myriad) I did so was because we eat "weird" and I didn't want them to get confused over what school tells them and how we eat.


              Yesterday I gave them both a challenge that next week they're to "eat like a bear" and bears don't eat things that come from a box or just from a store. I thought this might work as the kids are into animals and Native American stories right now. The 9 year old is raring to go because she can really tell the difference in how she feels internally when she eats different things. The 5 year old, being a complete stubborn little *turd*, I'm not sure how she's going to do. I will stick some primal pancakes in the mix for her, hopefully to entice her along. Will let you all know how they do!

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              • #8
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                Good to hear everyone's challenges and know that I am not alone. I have a 3.5 yo and 1.5 yo. I have been trying really hard to keep them primal. At home, they do alright, but as soon as we step foot out the door, their greedy eyes turn toward all the free samples of cookies and crap. And other people are just terrible influences. But the older one knows at least what things are healthy. I always ask her "Is it a plant or an animal? Or did it come from a box/bag?" She knows. I have a terrible time getting the veggies down, esp for the 1.5 yo.


                I think the bigger picture is what they are learning. When I grew up, I learned to snack on cereal and p-nut butter jelly sandwiches. That was my go-to snack. Now my kids will learn to snack on fruit and almond butter. They will certainly stray from primal eating when they are away from me, but once they get older, they will already have the tools in their belts when they decide to eat healthy themselves. I guess that is the best we can hope for.

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                • #9
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                  We have two kids who have eaten paleo since conception


                  Our youngest wanted solids by 6 months and will complain until we gave her a chunk of meat at dinner time.


                  We also have the grandparents trained to only give them 'real' food.

                  The "Seven Deadly Sins"

                  Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
                  Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
                  Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

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                  • #10
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                    Tarlach, good for you! My older daughter was doing fine for several years until we visited the grandparents (they live in the midwest; we live in new england). Once she was exposed to junky food it was really hard to get her to want to eat something else. My parents are much better now but the in-laws will give my kids stuff with articial sweeteners and junk if I'm not wicked viligant when we're visiting.

                    It's like navigating a minefield!

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                    • #11
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                      Here's a great post by Tom Naughton (the Fathead guy) about his daughters:


                      http://www.fathead-movie.com/index.p...-protein-tree/

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                      • #12
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                        On how to get your kids to eat more primally on their own accord:


                        Make being primal sort of a theme, and make it sound really fun. Emphasize that being a primal eater is for big, mature adults and when they feel they are big enough they are welcome to eat the primal foods that mommy and daddy eat.


                        Kids love to grow up fast, and this should make them really receptive to the idea.


                        I should know, because when I was a kid my dad tricked me into thinking that mowing the yard was a fun grown-up activity. Took me a few years to realize I had been duped, but by then it was too late.

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                        • #13
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                          Ha ha! Kyleec I had the same experience with the lawn mowing. It was marketed to me as "it's practice for driving the car". Duh - I grew up on a farm and was driving the farm truck and the big tractors at age 12. I don't know why I needed to practice with the lawn mower! I wasn't buying it!


                          I was hoping to make the transition to eating primal more fun for them with the "eat like a bear" week. Right now they're both on board. We're starting tomorrow with primal pancakes with strawberry sauce (cooked down strawberries with a touch of honey). They seem to really be noticing how good I feel so I think that's beginning to be good motivation for them.

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                          • #14
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                            I personally don't have any concrete information about this, but aren't kids' diets supposed to be a bit more carb-based anyway? Given that they move a lot, sometimes intensively, during the day? What are your thoughts on this?

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                            • #15
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                              I don't know about carb-"based". Given the facts that they're growing and are very active, they can handle a higher percentage of carbs than adults, but then again, they are very small so the absolute number of carbs in grams probably is still very low.


                              Going primal doesn't mean depriving them of carbs, though. Just means they are eating real meat, veggies, fruits, etc. instead of corndogs and fruit roll-ups.

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