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  • Jerusalem artichokes

    Jerusalem artichokes are Primal, aren't they? (please say yes). My parents just grew lots of these in their garden. They are delicious!! The best thing is that they hardly raise my blood sugar at all! They taste carby, but I don't get a carby blood sugar spike as I would with carrots, sweet potatoes etc. Very good news for a Diabetic!

    I cooked ribs yesterday in the oven with a tiny amount of carrot, onions and some water and towards the end added the JA to it so they cooked in the juice. OMG friggin' gorgeous!! The only downside is that they made me slightly.. flatulent but it was so worth it for the nomminess.

  • #2
    What is a Jerusalem artichoke?

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    • #3
      They are roots, but not starchy like potatoes. More like celery root. And their flavor is like... artichoke. They are yummy. I would guess if they don't raise blood sugar & they aren't starchy, they're primal. Apparently they have a distinctive flower, so they'd be pretty easy to find and dig up if you were Grok. Also they are hardy and tough to kill, so the same batch would keep growing in the same place for years.
      I think you can eat them raw but I prefer them roasted.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Sam Cree View Post
        What is a Jerusalem artichoke?

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerusalem_artichoke

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        • #5
          To me they taste like sunflower seeds, and they grow like mad. They are EASY to grow!! Don't put them anywhere you don't want them to stay, because they'll keep growing there unless you get out every trace of a tuber.

          SAQ --- umm, "flatulent" --- Well, they have a non-digestible starch in them (inulin) which for me has always been BAD NEWS on the flatulence front, but if you can manage them at all, why not? Spirit of peppermint, a little in some water, can help expel gas. Fennel seeds help, too. You can keep having fermented foods in the hope that they will settle your flora instead of letting them have a feeding frenzy on the Jerusalem artichokes. And/or you can space out your exposure to the inulin, so that you don't get a vicious cycle going with the flora pigging out over and over again. That is, have the Jerusalem artichokes, but put several days between servings to sort out the gut again.

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          • #6
            I think you could call them primal. Mark's article on the discovery of the grinding rocks raises a point. Being tubers their defense mechanisms (anti-nutrients) should not be centered on the edible part. Grains and legumes defend themselves from being eaten with anti-nutrients of course.
            http://www.facebook.com/daemonized

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sam Cree View Post
              What is a Jerusalem artichoke?
              I believe you may know them as "sunchokes"? It is a member of the sunflower family, I think - great tall plants, with tubers which are just delicious.

              Roasted around a joint they are amazing, or they make a stunning soup. They can also be used to make a gratin, rather like potato dauphinois, but using the jerusalem Artichokes.

              @StoneAge Queen - they are recommended as they contain inulin in masses - isn't it a prebiotic?? Also lots of nice minerals etc.

              And SO EASY to grow!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by elwyne View Post
                They are roots, but not starchy like potatoes. More like celery root. And their flavor is like... artichoke. They are yummy. I would guess if they don't raise blood sugar & they aren't starchy, they're primal. Apparently they have a distinctive flower, so they'd be pretty easy to find and dig up if you were Grok. Also they are hardy and tough to kill, so the same batch would keep growing in the same place for years.
                I think you can eat them raw but I prefer them roasted.
                Ha! Grok made bread out of 'em!

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                • #9
                  @piano-doctor-lady- Thanks for the advice.
                  @Breadsauce- Yes, they're really easy to grow! I'll definitely ask Mum and Dad to grow more next year. They seemed to like the Irish climate, too. Unlike the spaghetti squash!

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                  • #10
                    Once you start Jerusalem artichokes you can have them forever if you don't harvest the entire crop. They are very resistant to disease and insects. They can travel about your yard though--volunteering to grow in new places every now and then. They are very good--tasty and nutritious. Also, they are easily found in the wild, especially along highways, rail road tracks, etc. and also close to water. Look for them around willows and cottonwoods. Before you harvest in the wild, ensure that you really have a Jerusalem artichoke. There is an imitator--yellow ironweed---which, I am told, is not edible.

                    If you are seeking the plant in the fall or winter after leaves have fallen---Don't. Mark your chokes when they have leaves so you don't pick ironweed instead.

                    StoneAgeQueen---Jerusalem artichokes--which are not an artichoke but a sunflower--have no starch. They have inulin instead. Should make them fine for you.
                    Tayatha om bekandze

                    Bekandze maha bekandze

                    Randza samu gate soha

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                    • #11
                      Periquin, I beg to differ. They are only nutritious if you can digest them. And the inulin means that a lot of people can't digest them. (Like me ...)

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                      • #12
                        piano-doctor-lady: How are you? I hope all is well.

                        Your correction is accepted. I agree. If a person cannot digest something or has some other bad reaction to it is not good to eat. For example, many people have a severe reaction to anything bovine, so for them the whole grass fed beef thing is of no consequence. The finest pastured beef is as toxic waste to them.

                        My comment about inulin was directed to Stone-Age-Queen. I will not elaborate why the inulin could be of interest to her.
                        Tayatha om bekandze

                        Bekandze maha bekandze

                        Randza samu gate soha

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                        • #13
                          Hi, Periquin

                          I am doing ever so much better. The neuropathy is now down to the last half inch of my fingers, and I'm out tuning pianos again, phasing in gradually. It's a great relief. I'm not quite six months out from the treatment now. It's been a learning experience!

                          I just found that my mood is better if I take some good quality krill oil, and have tulsi tea. I plan to grow tulsi (and ashwagandha) next year. I'm trying to winter over three ashwagandha plants I found for sale locally, and I'm collecting seed from them.

                          Usually people would want to eat inulin instead of starch if they had trouble with diabetes, I assume. But if they also had trouble with irritable bowels, it probably wouldn't be a good suggestion.

                          The best book explaining this which I've seen is Elaine Gottschall's "Breaking the Vicious Cycle".

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                          • #14
                            piano-doctor-lady: Tulsi. I have been running into references about that pretty often lately. What can you tell me about it. I've seen the assorted web pages, but I would like to hear from someone with some experience. Not just the cold hard encyclopedia type facts or some ya gotta buy it hype.

                            I hope no one is upset about running away with the jerusalem artichoke line. Just to keep in with that thread----jerusalem artichoke is called that because the Spanish name for sunflower is girasol---because it turns with the sun. Girasol became jerusalem when it moved into Engllish. Now I feel better.
                            Tayatha om bekandze

                            Bekandze maha bekandze

                            Randza samu gate soha

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                            • #15
                              @periquin- I seem to have no problems with them, thankfully. I had some last night with roast pork, delicious!

                              @piano-doctor-lady- I had bad neuropathy in my hand to the point that one of my fingers was permanently turning inwards and I couldn't feel anything on the skin on the top of my hand. I've been taking Zymessence for two months now, and it's completely gone and my finger is straight for the first time in two years. It's also got rid of the pains I had in my feet, and blasted away any remaining insulin resistance. They're little miracles in a jar.

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