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What's the primal take on sprouts?

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  • What's the primal take on sprouts?

    I love sprouts, peas, mung beans, adzuki, they are sold here in little packets with their little sprouty tails and they are delish, also little powerhouses of enzymes, vitamins and minerals. According to the WAPF they also do not have any of the issues of phytates or enzyme inhibitors that normal peas and beans have because they've been sprouted.

    But, they are still a legume, so what's the deal?
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  • #2
    BUMP

    I dont have any insight on this, but I loooove snowpea shoots. Usually I avoid sprouts that have big beans on the end.
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    • #3
      I'm not sure what the official take is, however, I would say this.

      I recall reading something that Mark wrote saying that he still eats peas, even though they are a legume. Don't quote me on that though, but I'm pretty sure he said something to that affect.

      Either way, it's one of those things where the vegetable good outweighs the bad. I had peas last night in my soup, they were great. I think if you were to incorporate them into your diet, it wouldn't be a big deal; I wouldn't even count it as your '20 %'. Think of tomoatoes, loaded with sugar, but loaded with other nutrients. I love nightshades!

      Hope some of this helps.

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      • #4
        I actually emailed Mark about this about a month ago, asking about alfalfa and broccoli sprouts. That verdict, FWIW: "Yes, they're baby plants."
        "Trust me, you will soon enter a magical land full of delicious steakflowers, with butterbacons fluttering around over the extremely rompable grass and hillsides."

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        • #5
          Many sprouts, such as kidney beans, are toxic. Some sprouts can be cooked to remove the toxin, while others cannot.

          Sprouts are rich in digestible energy, bioavailable vitamins, minerals, amino acids, proteins, and phytochemicals, as these are necessary for a germinating plant to grow.

          Compared with mature plants, sprouts can yield vitamin contents 30 times higher.

          When seeds are sprouted, minerals chelate or merge with protein, in a way that increases their function.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprouting
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edible_sprouts

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          • #6
            Are shoots just slightly more mature sprouts?
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            • #7
              Originally posted by NourishedEm View Post
              According to the WAPF they also do not have any of the issues of phytates or enzyme inhibitors that normal peas and beans have because they've been sprouted.
              AFAIK, what you read on that site is not necessarily a WAPF position as such. Some of the stuff on that site is opinion pieces from individual contributors, although some seem to give a current editorial position.

              This statement seems to fall in the latter camp:

              Q. Please tell me if I should consume sprouted soybeans and other beans?

              A. We don't recommend soybean sprouts as the toxins are still there and soybean sprouts were not consumed in Asia. They used mung beans for sprouting. Sprouting increases some nutrients but also some toxins (which protect the sprouts from animals eating them). Also remember that in traditional societies, the grains and legumes that were sprouted were then cooked.
              That's interesting. I hadn't known that sprouting could actually increase some toxins.

              On the same page there's a comment about alfalfa:

              Q. What are the irritating substances found in sprouts? Do micro-greens contain any problems?

              A. The worst one is canavanine, in alfalfa sprouts--you will find disagreement about this on the internet, but it really is not a good thing. Most sprouts should be cooked or steamed before being eaten--that will get rid of a lot of problematic components.
              Alfalfa is known to be pretty nasty. It sounds like sprouting alfalfa doesn't necessarily solve that.

              Here's the link:

              http://www.westonaprice.org/faq/785-...uts-beans.html

              It sounds like it's a not a straightforward thing. Perhaps it's one to decide on culinary grounds - if there's some Chinese stir fry that usually has mung-bean sprouts in it then why not?

              OTOH, if people are scoffing bucketloads of alfalfa sprouts not because they like them but for functional reasons - say on account vegetarians have been recommending them on "health" grounds - maybe the joke's on them.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MeatMe216 View Post
                Are shoots just slightly more mature sprouts?
                Yes, snowpea shoots for example are usually sold with the pea/seed cut off, whereas spouts (at least the ones I buy) are generally mostly the seed with a new little tail.

                Originally posted by Lewis View Post
                On the same page there's a comment about alfalfa:
                Alfalfa is known to be pretty nasty. It sounds like sprouting alfalfa doesn't necessarily solve that.

                It sounds like it's a not a straightforward thing. Perhaps it's one to decide on culinary grounds - if there's some Chinese stir fry that usually has mung-bean sprouts in it then why not?

                OTOH, if people are scoffing bucketloads of alfalfa sprouts not because they like them but for functional reasons - say on account vegetarians have been recommending them on "health" grounds - maybe the joke's on them.
                Yeah, I read about alfalfa in Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon, I can't stand the stuff anyway so it's not an issue. The sprouts that I buy just have Mung, lentil, peas and beans.

                I love them and one 200g packet lasts me a week, so I think I will stick with them. Thanks for the feedback
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                • #9
                  I must say that after our taste-testing we like the broccoli sprouts a lot better than alfalfa. Alfalfa is too bitter/strong (bad sign right?). So, guess we'll stick with the nice safe broccoli sprouts!
                  "Trust me, you will soon enter a magical land full of delicious steakflowers, with butterbacons fluttering around over the extremely rompable grass and hillsides."

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