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  • Canned Sardines?

    Hey, new guy here! I just recently discovered Mark's work and it is vindicating because I have evolved a routine that nearly mirrors the primal blueprint, just from paying attention to my body and eating things I think are reasonable.

    Sardines seem like a perfect primal food; you eat the flesh, bones, skin, organs. Also, because they are so small, they dont build up the levels of environmental toxins that larger fish do.

    My question is whether canned sardines have any potential issues. Provided that you avoid added sodium or other junk, how safe are sardines in spring water or olive oil? Are there toxins to worry about from the canning process?

    Thanks!
    Lars

  • #2
    I bought them in olive oil and pour the whole can over a couple of cups of spinach. I think Mark said that these smaller fish (sardines, archovies and such) have low contamination levels. I still look for the ones that say they are wild caught.

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    • #3
      I eat at least two cans per week with mustard. Good stuff.
      Calorie Counter

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      • #4
        I think most sardine cans are aluminum, not stainless steel, so you don't have to worry about BPA at least.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
          I think most sardine cans are aluminum, not stainless steel, so you don't have to worry about BPA at least.
          I thought BPA was generally used in making plastics. Wouldn't aluminum be more prone to leeching and need some type of a coating compared to stainless steel which would be fine bare?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Lars86 View Post
            I thought BPA was generally used in making plastics. Wouldn't aluminum be more prone to leeching and need some type of a coating compared to stainless steel which would be fine bare?
            I'm not sure honestly. I know that many stainless steel cans use BPA though. I emailed the makers of Brunswick sardines and they replied that since the can was aluminum, it did not have a BPA lining. I also read on a thread here that Black Top salmon cans are BPA-free.

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            • #7
              I've just recently discovered this as a relatively low-cost protein and omega-3 option. I remember reading somewhere that you want to get your fish oils from the lower food chain fish like sardines, not the big top predators like tuna. As long as you get the kind that doesn't have sugar or starch or crap added to them, you should be getting some great protein and fat there.

              I like the spring water ones myself.
              Getting my Grok on in the Pacific Northwest.

              "C is for cookie, that's good enough for me."
              "Cookie is a sometimes food."
              "Sometimes cookie monster eat APPLE instead of COOKIE. Sometimes eat CARROT."
              -Cookie Monster, partially reformed sugarholic

              "

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Lars86 View Post
                I thought BPA was generally used in making plastics. Wouldn't aluminum be more prone to leeching and need some type of a coating compared to stainless steel which would be fine bare?
                I'd think it's more likely to be an issue if the food is acidic. Probably the plastic coating inside aluminium water-bottles, like the Sigg ones, is in case people carry fruit juice or isotonic drinks or the like in them. You can put all those kinds of things in stainless steel - which is why it's used in the food industry so widely (e.g. winemaking). But food cans aren't going to be stainless steel - too expensive. They used to be steel coated with tin, but plastic coatings are common now.

                I don't use aluminium pans for cooking, but AFAIK they're not a big problem unless you go boiling fruit in them or something like that.

                I guess boiling salty things up in aluminium saucepans wouldn't be a good idea either - salty air by the sea will attack even anodized aluminium window frames.

                But sardines in olive oil in a closed can probably aren't going to do much, if anything, to the metal of the can.
                Last edited by Lewis; 10-12-2010, 10:55 PM.

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                • #9
                  sardines are cooked in the can so anything in that can is probably leeching into the fish.

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                  • #10
                    http://www.ewg.org/bisphenol-a-info?...FQITbAodz3Ltig

                    plastic lined cans are the worst for bpa
                    this site lists all bpa product to stay away from....

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Setabas View Post
                      I bought them in olive oil and pour the whole can over a couple of cups of spinach. I think Mark said that these smaller fish (sardines, archovies and such) have low contamination levels. I still look for the ones that say they are wild caught.
                      Snap! Love 'em! What makes me laugh is that Sainsbury's sells them for 55p if you have them bones and all, but you can add 25p to that if you want the bones out - I just think who the hell wants to eat boneless sardines...?!

                      Well, if you want to be pedantic (and I do!) they don't have bones, it's cartilage.

                      I didn't know sardines could be farmed. Most of the ones sold here (in fact I'd go so far as to say ALL the sardines sold over here) are Portuguese.
                      La tristesse durera toujours...

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                      • #12
                        I tried making Alton Brown's "famous" sardine and avocado sandwich the other day. I like guacamole, I like sardines in real Caesar salad dressing. I do not like them together. It was gross. He gets into it around 2:45 here
                        carl's cave

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for the replies guys, keep em coming... I went ahead and emailed King Oscar which is one of my favorite brands. I'll post up when they reply about their tins...

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                          • #14
                            I believe that Brunswick, King Oscar, BeachCliff and Bumble Bee are all owned by the same company, so hopefully they are all BPA free. I've tried King Oscar before but it's so much more expensive than Brunswick that I can't justify spending the extra cash. Especially with the number of cans I go through in a week, haha.

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                            • #15
                              I get the ones just in plain water and avoid any of the sauces that they put them in. Even when they say olive oil in a lot of stuff if you read label it's some olive oil mixed in with some kind of corn, soy, or other vegetable oil. I'd rather go with 10W40.
                              http://www.facebook.com/daemonized

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