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  • Split Pea Soup

    I wonder how we feel about split pea soup. It seems kind of like a bean or lentil, although it's called a pea so i wonder if it's on the primal menu. Forgive me if there are any posts or obvious info about this. I just REALLY love pea soup. The kind i buy - in a can - has a pretty pure list of ingredients - "Water, Yellow Peas, Lard, Salt, Onion Powder and Spice". That's it. How does that sound to you guys?
    Last edited by amandatea; 10-06-2010, 10:36 AM.

  • #2
    I have no idea, but I love how people have resorted to apologizing if there is already a post on their topic for fear of being attacked by the hard-core MDA readers- I do it too lol!

    I love split pea soup and I love pea salad as well- peas, mayo, shredded cheese, chopped onion and boiled egg. Delish! Although I haven't indulged since going primal because I haven't been sure about peas either.
    "It may be normal darling, but I'd rather be natural." -Holly Golightly

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    • #3
      Haha. Damn! I was hoping for an answer. And, yeah, I just really hate asking stupid questions

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      • #4
        Pea = legume = technically not PB.

        However I've seen snow peas used in recipes on the main MDA site...

        I'd enjoy it as a treat In fact, I tried making ham and split pea soup, and although it tasted amazing by then I was "sensitised" so bloated up like a balloon! Just beware, start off with a small bowl....

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        • #5
          Thanks for the info NMG!
          "It may be normal darling, but I'd rather be natural." -Holly Golightly

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          • #6
            I'd eat peas - happily. I'm sure they'd have appeared naturally , seasonally, and been used - cooked of course. And dried ones, with bacon or ham and onions - make stunning soup! Soak up lots of lard too.....

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            • #7
              I know beans like kidney, butter and other sorts are very toxic to eat when raw, but what about broad beans and peas? I eat them all the time from my Dad's garden with no problem. Would Grok have stumbled upon any peas?

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              • #8
                I love split pea and ham soup and don't worry about it being a legume. But I do make sure I soak them overnight first and then cook them. I also eat frozen peas and broad beans from the garden, they have never upset my stomach - it's wheat that is a problem for me! One can't be too anal about the whole PB thing, you have to do what fits in with your digestive system and you are getting the results you want.

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                • #9
                  Well, I have a feeling that my body doesn't like split peas because I had that this morning - weird, i know - and i have been gassy all day. I haven't been gassy for weeks before today. I have also been really tired all day but i think that's due to a lack of sufficient sleep. Anyway. I think i'll just stick to pea soup as a once in a blue moon thing. Thanks for the info though, everyone!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by codeguy
                    There's an Asian supermarket where I live and they have several kinds of "fried" broadbeans that are packaged as a snack. They are similar to "Corn Nuts" in appearance, only darker. I have never tried them. Any kind of peas are definately legumes and not considered Paleo/Primal. However, if you just gotta' have 'em, they are one of the least insulin inducing legumes, scoring around 20 on the glycemic index.
                    Yep, those are the kind that grow in Dad's garden. They really are delicious and I can eat a lot of them without any stomach problems or anything. And raw peas are sooo good!

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                    • #11
                      As I understand ... peas are actually a fruit from the plant (from the ovary) and are not botonically a legume. After harvest as a green pea in a pod (like english peas), they can be shelled (pod removed) and dried. When they have dried out the thin shell covering the pea is removed and they can be split along a natural point on the pea. They would have been something that could have been seasonally collected by Grok. Drying them ... and who knows, splitting, them even to preserve, perhaps over winters. Our problem with them is that they are high carb ... somewhere right up there with potatoes as I remember.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Martha Eve View Post
                        As I understand ... peas are actually a fruit from the plant (from the ovary) and are not botonically a legume. After harvest as a green pea in a pod (like english peas), they can be shelled (pod removed) and dried. When they have dried out the thin shell covering the pea is removed and they can be split along a natural point on the pea. They would have been something that could have been seasonally collected by Grok. Drying them ... and who knows, splitting, them even to preserve, perhaps over winters. Our problem with them is that they are high carb ... somewhere right up there with potatoes as I remember.
                        Um, there are no ovaries on a pea plant. And peas are a legume. That said, I think they are pretty inoffensive as an "off plan" indulgence when compared to grain products.

                        Peas - Whole Green Peas, Whole Yellow Peas, Split Green Peas, Split Yellow Peas from Diefenbaker Seed Processors

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                        • #13
                          Yes, peas belong to the Leguminosae family but they are different from beans in that beans are known to be toxic and would have been avoided. Green peas (not green beans)/English peas/sweet peas are not toxic and can and are often eaten raw. The leaves are also edible and are used as an herb in some areas..

                          "Sweet or green peas can be eaten raw or cooked, while field peas are primarily dried for storage and require long periods of simmering to cook them thoroughly (Smith 251)." from the URL below

                          Peas do have ovaries and in fact the pea pod does develop from the ovary.

                          "Like many flowers, those found on legume plants are hermaphroditic, containing both the stamen and pistil. This makes the plants self-fertile, meaning that an individual plant is able to reproduce by itself which can have the effect of limiting genetic diversity. However, hybridization occurs frequently in nature due to this characteristic, as any plant can pollinate another due to the hermaphroditic properties therein (Weaver 57). This creates difficulty in clearly defining the differences that enter between subspecies. The flower typically has five petals and an ovary with one carpel, cavity, and style (Morris 365). The distinctive nature of the flowers is not in the parts but in the shape of the parts. The general pattern of legume flowers follows that of the pea blossom. The result of this arrangement is that of a papilionaceous design, which means butterflylike (Earle 11). The petals of the legume plant are shaped into a cup. One large petal, the 'banner' or 'standard' folds over the rest for protection. In front of this petal are two narrower petals called 'wings,' between which two other petals unite. Due to their shape these petals are referred to as the keel. Within that fold are the stamens and pistil (Earle 10). After pollination the flower will die and reveal the growing ovary which becomes the pod."
                          from: academics.hamilton.edu/foodforthought/Our...files/beans_peas.pdf

                          It's the carbs that prevent me from eating peas. And I agree ...inoffensive. It's just interesting that there are foods out there that we forget about sometimes.
                          Last edited by Martha Eve; 07-04-2012, 07:20 AM. Reason: too argumentive -- wanted to soften the response a bit

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                          • #14
                            Hmm. Interesting. Not being a botanist, I didn't realize that the word ovary was also used for that precursor to the pod in a legume. MDA is so educational.

                            But general consensus, yes, it's a legume but, no, it's not the worst thing you could eat. I remember helping my Mom take the peas out of the pods (back in the dark ages) and I remember noshing on a few raw. They were quite tasty.

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