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Teaching Doctors About Nutrition and Diet

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  • Teaching Doctors About Nutrition and Diet

    At this pace, we might live to see CW fall

    “Physicians have enough barriers trying to provide their patients with nutritional counseling,” Ms. Adams said. “Inadequate nutritional education does not need to be one of them.”
    http://nyti.ms/a0AQBj
    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

  • #2
    Cool article SS. I had heard a ways back about how little nutritional training doctors get. I don't think most people realize that, though.

    I like to think that many people are realizing that they have to take responsibility for their own health, and educate their doctors.

    Who knows, though!?
    sigpic "Boy I got vision and the rest of the world is wearing bifocals" - Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

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    • #3
      Excellent article, SS. Thanks for posting.
      Start weight: 250 - 06/2009
      Current weight: 199
      Goal: 145

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      • #4
        The primary reason I left the endocrinologist that saw me through thyroid cancer was because he pooh-poohed nutrition. Imagine that!

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        • #5
          np guys.
          It's really incredible that nutrition, given it's huge impact in our health, is not given the priority it obviously deserves.
          The amount of information being generated that contradicts CW is increasing very quickly and can't be ignored for ever.
          “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
          "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
          "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

          Comment


          • #6
            My doctor in the local medical centre was amazed when I was able to stop taking steroids for asthma. He asked what I had done to manage this and when I told him no grains at all, no oils high in omega 6, lots of fats, meats and veg - he looked blank. I felt that he thought it a coincidence rather than the cause of the asthma going away!

            He took my blood pressure when I told him how much sat fat I eat - checked on the computer from the last time it had been checked - and of course, it was lower.

            I would have liked to have had him decide to suggest this way of eating for a couple of other asthmatics - but he didn't.

            Medics have a lot to learn!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by SerialSinner View Post
              At this pace, we might live to see CW fall

              http://nyti.ms/a0AQBj

              yes, that's all well and good, SS, but it says NOTHING about training them in anything other than CW 'nutritional' practices! I've been to the ADA website and it's full of CW minsinformation (and that's me being polite about it!). Yesterday was Healthy Kids Day, apparently. So I downloaded their PDF on healthy and nutritional snacks for kids. These were some of the suggestions: -

              Mini pizza made from half an English muffin topped with pasta sauce and LOW or FAT FREE cheese (yes, they're recommending frankencheese for growing kiddies!)
              Hoummus and breadsticks
              PBJ sarnie (apparently that's healthy!)
              Smoothie made with non-fat milk!
              Low or non-fat yoghurt with fruit

              Everything was 'low fat' this or 'non-fat' that. I CAN'T believe this is what the ADA's recommending you feed your kids!

              Having said that - the slogan of the BDA is 'Trust a Dietitian to Know About Nutrition' *FACEPALM*
              La tristesse durera toujours...

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              • #8
                Shrinking_Violet, I second your facepalm.

                OH NOES! TEH SATURATED FATZ R GONNA GET U!!!1
                The Primal Holla! Eating fat. Getting lean. Being awesome.

                You were sick, but now you're well, and there's work to do. - Kilgore Trout

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                • #9
                  It would be great to have doctors that had the knowledge and time to educate the masses about nutrition. In their defense however, they don't have the time, or the man power. Doctors here in the US are in short supply, and overwhelmed. I would like to see a better understanding on how diet can improve health.

                  As for actual weight loss, and diet advise? A better plan would be seeing doctors and insurance companies pushing people to properly trained nutritionist for diet guidance.
                  Last edited by Shibbel; 10-05-2010, 09:44 AM.
                  You don't pay your bills with counterfeit money, so why feed your body with counterfeit food?

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                  • #10
                    I wish we could get access to the training course from UNC. I checked and its only available for medical students and their instructors. Is anybody here one of those and willing to take a look. I'm really curious to see if this is just more CW.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by breadsauce View Post
                      My doctor in the local medical centre was amazed when I was able to stop taking steroids for asthma. He asked what I had done to manage this and when I told him no grains at all, no oils high in omega 6, lots of fats, meats and veg - he looked blank. I felt that he thought it a coincidence rather than the cause of the asthma going away!

                      He took my blood pressure when I told him how much sat fat I eat - checked on the computer from the last time it had been checked - and of course, it was lower.

                      I would have liked to have had him decide to suggest this way of eating for a couple of other asthmatics - but he didn't.

                      Medics have a lot to learn!
                      I to,like Breadsuce,have recently had an episode at my Docs that left them amazed.Weight down 35lbs ,trigs lower,hdl higher ,HBA1C lower,serum urea much improved etc.Overall serum cholesterol and ldl were higher but this didn't bother my diabetes nurse who noticed my ratios were great .I told them my lifestyle/diet changes and to the nurses great credit she said carry on with it,your'e doing a good job.This is the same nurse who told me to eat low fat/high carb when i was diagnosed type 2 a few years back.She also congratulated me on taking my health matters into my own hands. Just maybe some medicos are beginning to take notice of the good science.
                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        Given that the training that Dr's would get if they did get more of an emphasis on nutrition is probably bad I don't know if that's a good or a bad thing. We've had videos posted up here with over weight out shape "dietitians" on here talking about how to cook for weight loss.
                        My mother was telling me last night that one of the Dr's that she knows also does acupuncture. I was kind of surprised really. I would think that acupuncture is more the realm of an Eastern holistic types than a traditional Western Doctor.
                        http://www.facebook.com/daemonized

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                        • #13
                          Threadjack...

                          There's a really cool series of articles by The Healty Skeptic on acupuncture here: http://thehealthyskeptic.org/acupuncture . Basically he goes into the ACTUAL history of acupuncture and shows how it goes hand in hand with western medicine for the most part. Really cool info...

                          /threadjack
                          sigpic "Boy I got vision and the rest of the world is wearing bifocals" - Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

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                          • #14
                            I found a study that showed as of 2008 only 30% of med schools in the U.S. required a nutrition course... that's ONE nutrition course for pre med students. The other 70% had no requirement.

                            "...only 32 schools (30%) required a separate nutrition course. On average, students received 23.9 contact hours of nutrition instruction during medical school (range: 2–70 h). Only 40 schools required the minimum 25 h recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. Most instructors (88%) expressed the need for additional nutrition instruction at their institutions."

                            - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti...0/?tool=pubmed

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                            • #15
                              I know it has been said before but I will repeat - I don't recall a single day in medical school where we studied proper nutrition of normal adults. Sure we talked about protein, etc. for burn victims, as an example, or how to calculate the formula an infant needs, but never just how a regular adult ought to eat and exercise.

                              And I can guarantee you, on none of the 3 board exams for MD nor on any of the Family Medicine board certification tests I have taken was adult nutrition tested.

                              The system is focused on fixing conditions, but not to prevent them. The exceptions are where money is to be made : colonoscopies, mammograms, etc. as "preventive" measures. As I have said elsewhere, there is no money in educating the patient, so many physicians don't learn it themselves and/or actually bother.

                              As physicians who feel like we now get it, I think we can help by educating our patients as well as training our medical students/residents beyond what they are fed at medical school. And finally, if any physician is on a medical school faculty, he/she can push for curricular changes.

                              It starts by you educating your doctor. If you feel strongly about it, buy him Mark's book. Every doctor who has practiced for awhile has received books from patients. They are appreciated, and read, if just to understand what the patient is like. I have learned a great deal from my patients.
                              Last edited by Joe; 10-05-2010, 10:19 AM. Reason: spelling
                              Never eat anything bigger than your own head.

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