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  • Eating Late.

    I hate this rule. But, I TRY not to eat late because of all the things I've heard over the years.
    Is it bunk?
    Can I eat late?
    If not can you please explain the whys of it so at least it makes sense, please?
    Thanks in advance.
    Birdie
    *chirp*

  • #2
    Total garbage. Your body is a calorie inferno, if you are hungry eat. It doesn't matter when you take in your calories, your body will burn them. You even burn calories when you sleep.
    Meghan

    My MDA journal

    Primal Ponderings- my blog- finally added some food pron :P

    And best of all my Body Fat Makeover!!

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    • #3
      It's BS. Eat if you're hungry, don't if you're not.
      Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
      My Latest Journal

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      • #4
        I don't think it's so much as to when you eat, as it is to what you eat. And with this diet, I think you'll be fine. Having worked 2 jobs before, I understand where you are. If you're hungry, I think you should eat.

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        • #5
          Awesome! You guys rock.
          Still open to contrary opinions, but gonna get a snack first.

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          • #6
            Bullshit. It's another nutritional internet myth. A Long time ago, I have heard that your body digest food very slowing after 8:00PM, so it best to eat before that time. WTF? Total bullshit! LOL!

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            • #7
              Now, if someone snacks a LOT and then stops snacking they reduce their calories and lose weight. So for some people, stopping eating after 8 pm 'helps' them lose weight, not because of any other reason then they reduce how much they are eating overall. Usually this works for people who mindlessly watch TV and eat an entire bag of chips or something.
              Meghan

              My MDA journal

              Primal Ponderings- my blog- finally added some food pron :P

              And best of all my Body Fat Makeover!!

              Comment


              • #8
                I try to stop eating by 6pm and don't eat until the next day after noon so as to get a daily mini-fast. But if you aren't into intermittent fasting or would rather extent the fast into the morning then you should eat at night if you feel like eating at night. Just don't eat anything sugary and you will be good. CW likely says that because everything they eat is massively carby and contains sugar, wheat exorphins and other nasty stuff.
                Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

                Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

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                • #9
                  It's not BS at all. The body has a circadian rhythm, with the various hormones and enzymes speaking to each other according to a certain schedule. You ignore this and they don't hear the messages properly.

                  Read "Mastering Leptin" by Byron Richards, then do what you please and make up your own mind. But melatonin and leptin and ghrelin and agouti and insulin and growth hormone aren't chaotic in their actions. They want to do a trade-off depending on the time of day.

                  Just for a single example, there's insulin. You start eating, and the pancreas releases a certain amount of insulin, which is determined mostly by how big the previous meal was. And then awhile later, it samples the blood sugar again, and decides how much more to release. When all goes well, this is an elegant system which works to deal with just what you ate, to get the right amount into your cells, and store the rest.

                  Now, what people don't realize is that the first dose of insulin comes from granules stored up for the purpose. And if you snack a couple of hours after eating, the pancreas has not had time to make these granules, so it has to stop its quiet preparation for the next meal (which should be four or five hours later) and churn out insulin as if it were the second type. And it tends to overdo. (It gets grumpy, one might say, because you've given it work during what should be its restoration period.)

                  We're already screwing with the natural program by using artificial light year round, often late at night. For most of us, this gives us an eternal summer, when we should be fattening for the dark cold winter ... only instead we just go on fattening.

                  But sure, snack whenever you like ... you're grown ups, aren't you? That means that whenever you hear something you find inconvenient, you are allowed to say it's a pile of BS. <snide grin>

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                  • #10
                    Interesting question. I wondered if the nightime eating thing was tied into the thoery that our body 'repairs' itself when we are sleeping. I wonder if that is a myth too.

                    If that is true (that our bodies repair whilst sleeping) then I thought there could be a shred of truth to an argument that it is better for your body to repair whilst sleeping, rather than also focussing on digestion as well. But, where does that leave you anyway - I can't see a connection to weight gain, which is the theory usually advanced. Besides, I imagine at a cellular levels our bodies do what they have to do, regardless of whether its sleep time or not. Then again, our hormones do fluctuate as we sleep. Is the 'repair whilst you sleep' myth a myth?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Zed View Post
                      Bullshit. It's another nutritional internet myth. A Long time ago, I have heard that your body digest food very slowing after 8:00PM, so it best to eat before that time. WTF? Total bullshit! LOL!

                      Yep, I saw a nutritionist once who told me that I should NEVER eat tea later than 5pm, so that my body would have time to digest it/burn it off before I went to bed! *FACEPALM*


                      It was also her answer to my insomnia!
                      La tristesse durera toujours...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Stabby View Post
                        I try to stop eating by 6pm and don't eat until the next day after noon so as to get a daily mini-fast. But if you aren't into intermittent fasting or would rather extent the fast into the morning then you should eat at night if you feel like eating at night. Just don't eat anything sugary and you will be good. CW likely says that because everything they eat is massively carby and contains sugar, wheat exorphins and other nasty stuff.
                        Stabby, sorry this is probably a dumb question but, when you say "sugary" are you meaning anything with any type of sugar in it (e.g. fructose, lactose, etc) not just glucose (not that we eat that anyway).

                        So it's not so good for me to have a bowl of berries and yoghurt before I get me kip, then...? So all this business about casein being good for helping you sleep's BS, then...?
                        La tristesse durera toujours...

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                        • #13
                          i cant sleep if i eat before bed...i toss and turn with horrible digestion. eating late also backs me up, ill be constipated all week. due to eating late or lack of sleep from eatng late? I DONT KNOW. haha, but i agree with piano lady...i read abou the light and curcadian rhythms yesterday actually lemme see if i can find it
                          Get on my Level
                          http://malpaz.wordpress.com/

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                          • #14
                            Abstract
                            Increased longevity and improved health can be achieved in mammals by two feeding regimens, caloric restriction (CR), which limits the amount of daily calorie intake, and intermittent fasting (IF), which allows the food to be availablead libitum every other day. The precise mechanisms mediating these beneficial effects are still unresolved. Resetting the circadian clock is another intervention that can lead to increased life span and well being, while clock disruption is associated with aging and morbidity. Currently, a large body of evidence links circadian rhythms with metabolism and feeding regimens. In particular, CR, and possibly also IF, can entrain the master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the brain hypothalamus. These findings raise the hypothesis that the beneficial effects exerted by these feeding regimens could be mediated, at least in part, through resetting of the circadian clock, thus leading to synchrony in metabolism and physiology. This hypothesis is reinforced by a transgenic mouse model showing spontaneously reduced eating alongside robust circadian rhythms and increased life span. This review will summarize recent findings concerning the relationships between feeding regimens, circadian rhythms, and metabolism with implications for ageing attenuation and life span extension.
                            http://www.impactaging.com/papers/v2...ll/100116.html

                            another good read
                            http://www.impactaging.com/papers/v2...ll/100154.html

                            Abstract
                            By regulating the metabolism of fatty acids, carbohydrates, and xenobiotic, the mammalian circadian clock plays a fundamental role on the liver physiology. At present, it is supposed that the circadian clock regulates metabolism mostly by regulating the expression of liver enzymes at the transcriptional level. However, recent evidences suggest that some signaling pathways synchronized by the circadian clock can also influence metabolism at a post-transcriptional level. In this context, we have recently shown that the circadian clock synchronizes the rhythmic activation of the IRE1α pathway in the endoplasmic reticulum. The absence of circadian clock perturbs this secondary clock, provokes deregulation of endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzymes, and leads to impaired lipid metabolism. We will describe here the additional pathways synchronized by the clock and discussed the influence of the circadian clock-controlled feeding rhythm on them

                            http://www.impactaging.com/papers/v2...ll/100123.html
                            Get on my Level
                            http://malpaz.wordpress.com/

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                            • #15
                              How late did Grok eat? I was under impression he didn't stay up late?
                              My journal
                              7/5/11 -Size 14;
                              1/10/12 -Size 4

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