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  • #31
    1



    if you eat them till you finish your university, then go to work and afford organic ones

    I closed the tab, but I read a blog of one doctor (I think) who lived on the cheapest meat possible to show people than even the poor can be very healthy on this cheap eggs, meat etc. I don't think he is mad

    I will be normal. I will be NORMAL again
    Yeah!

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    • #32
      1



      So 6 cheap eggs a day, for four years won't do much damage? :P I wouldn't go for it.


      Do you think that this whole antibiotics/hormones/living in poop is an exageration? I mean, I know it's real, but is it actually dangerous?

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      • #33
        1



        Pastured Eggs > Organic Omega 3 eggs Free Cage Free> Organic Eggs > Non Organic Eggs >>>> non-primal foods


        To answer your question, non-organic eggs are not bad but pastured are better

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        • #34
          1



          if cheap eggs would change your health to be 5% worse, then anyway it would be nothing compared to 95% gains from eating primal ; )

          I will be normal. I will be NORMAL again
          Yeah!

          Comment


          • #35
            1



            Okay thanks guys, if I have to I will resort to buying the cheap ones until I find a local farm market where I can get it from.

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            • #36
              1



              You know you can always make one month a year a "free range organic eggs month" and see if there&#39;s any difference

              I will be normal. I will be NORMAL again
              Yeah!

              Comment


              • #37
                1



                I&#39;m not saying you can&#39;t eat cheap eggs. You can. Nothing about them will make you feel bad immediately. But over the scale of years, the extra omega-6 will lower your metabolism, increase your susceptibility to cancer, make your skin age faster, etc.

                I pay about 10% more for my eggs compared to EB. And I eat a lot of damn eggs (12 dozen chicken and 1 dozen duck in the fridge right now).


                My point was just that we should say those eggs are just as good as these eggs; people should understand the exact nature of the nutritional tradeoff they&#39;re making by buying the store eggs or the Eggland&#39;s Best. And as I noted earlier, all pastured is not equal, because most folks have to supplement with grains at some point or another to keep the birds alive, and how much they do that drastically changes the quality.


                I actually asked my farmer about supplementing with trucked in crickets or some such, and he said he had a multiyear mealworm raising project intended for chicken feed, but ultimately what they were feeding the mealworms was grain-derived, so it ended up yielding very little benefit. The food chain really has to start with grass and spirulina and plankton, or shit gets messed up.

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                • #38
                  1



                  Nick, are you saying that between Eggland&#39;s Best ("Organic") and the 1 dollar-per-dozen kind at the supermarket there&#39;s no difference? I thought that EG were at least a step above them.

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                  • #39
                    1



                    They are different, yeah. Supplemented with ALA, the form of Omega-3 found in flax. Normal eggs will have some DHA and EPA, which are very difficult for your body to make from ALA. The nutritional deficits of conventionally raised eggs are many, though, and can&#39;t be fixed by simply adding flax to the chicken feed.


                    You&#39;re missing out on vitamins A, D, E, K2, and beta-carotene still, although EB is supposedly better when it comes to E. The only major selling point is that they have lower saturated fat and cholesterol..which anyone here should not care about. Before I was buying pastured eggs, I definitely thought it was worth it to buy the EB rather than the normal eggs, fwiw.


                    I did manage to dig up exactly what EB franchisees (many large egg companies sell under that brand name) feed the chickens, which is kind of interesting:
                    [quote]

                    It all starts with the special Eggland’s Best hen feed, a patented all natural, all vegetarian feed that contains healthy grains, canola oil, and an all natural supplement of rice bran, alfalfa, sea kelp and Vitamin E. It contains no animal fat, no animal byproducts, and no recycled or processed food.</blockquote>

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                    • #40
                      1



                      Canola oil eh? Thank you for that info. Animal fat and animal byproducts would actually be proper hen food, right? Wow, these are definitely the last I buy from them.

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                      • #41
                        1



                        Better the chickens get that "healthy diet" than me!


                        Raphael, don&#39;t sweat it. YOU aren&#39;t eating it, it&#39;s two steps removed from your breakfast plate. (Chicken, egg, you.)


                        I just don&#39;t see the need to pay more for a very slightly superior product.

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                        • #42
                          1



                          OTB, the higher up the chain you go, the more important it is that you eat the best you can afford. In Nina Planck&#39;s "Real Food", she says, if she has to choose between the organic vegetables and pastured meat, she&#39;d choose pastured meat.

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                          • #43
                            1



                            Raphael, Eggland is NOT organic.


                            You&#39;re right, maba. But seldom are things such a clear choice. You can buy a lot of organic even veggies for what pastured beef or chickens cost at Hole Foods.

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                            • #44
                              1



                              "Hole Foods" was that intentional? :P


                              Tomorrow I will go to a greenmarket held here in NYC and I&#39;m going to look for some eggs. What are the questions I should ask the farmers? How do I determine whether the eggs are worth it or not?

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                              • #45
                                1



                                FWIW, I&#39;ve found I actually spend a lot less on groceries, at least with the farmers I&#39;ve been able to find, buying pastured stuff, instead of shopping at grocery stores (and I had about five different places I went in order to get the best price on everything). If you ask me if it&#39;s worth it to buy an "organic" chicken breast for $6.99/lb versus a standard Perdue chicken breast for $2.99/lb..uh, probably not. I can get whole pastured chickens for $2.50-4.50/lb at my FM, depending on who I&#39;m buying from though, so it&#39;s a moot point. Likewise I get grass fed beef and pastured pork for an average of $4.50/lb, and eggs for $3.33/dz, and pork belly for $5.50/lb if I want to make some bacon. These are not exorbitant prices. If you desire to pay them, there are certainly farmers at markets in this area who will accommodate you, but I shop around and avoid those markets.


                                Bottom line: I was just trying to say that in economics the consumer always has to consider marginal benefit vs. marginal cost, and I have been lucky to find situations where marginal cost is small and marginal benefit is large. If all you have is farmers charging $5/dz for all corn-fed eggs, that sucks. Just keep in mind that a small increase in quality isn&#39;t always worth an arbitrary increase in price.

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