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How much tuna is too much tuna?

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  • #16
    One of my absolute favorite pre-primal meals used to be canned tuna and white rice. The taste to me was unreal, my family, especially my father, didn't understand because none of them really like tuna but I would have it at least twice a day most days. I haven't touched a can of tuna since turning primal... isn't it funny how you can almost forget about such a thing? I can't have tuna alone though but I think I'll give it a shot with cauliflower "rice" ... hmmm
    I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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    • #17
      I heartily agree with all the evidence about selenium, and mercury not really being an issue. But I did some research a few years ago when I was eating a lot of tuna, and even if you don't believe the evidence about mercury, I still found out that to hit the EPA recommended ingestion dosages for mercury, you'd need to eat 4 cans of tuna a week. What they don't tell you is that the EPA recommended ingestion dosages is TEN TIMES lower than the actual harmful amount to humans. So even if you don't believe that our bodies can handle the mercury due to the selenium, you'd still need to eat 40 cans of tuna per week to actually get to harmful dosages (theoretically).

      It's just more CW fear mongering.

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      • #18
        Yellow fin vs. albacore:

        I don't know what reasons Invino77 has, but albacore is reputed to have higher mercury content than yellow fin. The post above his addressed mercury in tuna. However, albacore also has a higher omega 3 content. I guess that ya just picks yur pizzen.
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        Bekandze maha bekandze

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        • #19
          Originally posted by brians_ona_boat View Post
          I read in Menshealth that drinking green tea with your tuna meal could reduce the harmful effect of the mercury, idk how true it is though really??
          Originally posted by periquin View Post
          Yellow fin vs. albacore:

          I don't know what reasons Invino77 has, but albacore is reputed to have higher mercury content than yellow fin. The post above his addressed mercury in tuna. However, albacore also has a higher omega 3 content. I guess that ya just picks yur pizzen.
          I don't know any other way to say it:

          the selenium binds with the mercury making it a nonissue. As long as you're not eating whale, shark, tilefish, etc fish is beneficial, even tunafish.

          Unfortunately albacore and tongol are both caugh in environemntally devastating ways.

          Best to stick with young troll and poll-caught fish but they do run about $5/can. They also have a lot more Ω3 - about 5g/2 oz.



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          • #20
            Troll and poll sounds creepy....
            Don't be a paleotard...

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

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            • #21
              IMHO...
              I really don't think there IS such a thing as too much tuna, especially if it's raw and sliced...with a little wasabi.
              I think that most of the sushi-grade is caught on lines, so they don't get bruised.
              Did I mention I love me some tuna?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by kuno1chi View Post
                I think that most of the sushi-grade is caught on lines, so they don't get bruised.
                long-line though....sushi tuna is definitely environmentally problematic - albeit tasty!



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                • #23
                  Originally posted by cillakat View Post
                  No amount of tuna can cause mercury poisoning. The seychelles child development study clearly showed that with rare exception (whale, shark, tilefish, king mackerel) mercury in fish is not a problem - likely due to the selenium content. Most fish are high in selenium which binds with the mercury harmlessly escorting it from the body.

                  the problem with tuna, tends to not be mercury (regardless of what CW says on the issue) but bycatch and overfishing. It's best to use pole or troll caught rather than the ubiquitous purse-seine and long lines.
                  Very true about the selenium. Fish developed high levels of selenium as protection for mercury that has been present in the sea forever mainly because of volcano. Eating fish high in selenium protects you against mercury binding to brain cells.
                  Get great paleo diet lifestyle tricks, recipes and cooking tips. My contribution to the paleo movement.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by cillakat View Post
                    long-line though....sushi tuna is definitely environmentally problematic - albeit tasty!
                    Sigh.
                    Well, since I can't really afford it very often anyway...
                    Rats. But thanks for letting me know this.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 979roadrunner View Post
                      I don't eat tuna. I eat Tilapia. No mercury concerns.
                      Yeah, but also none of the health benefits of eating fatty fish, and plenty of O6. Tilapia might be environmentally sustainable, but it's not a substitute for wild-caught, cold-water fatty fish like salmon and tuna. Here's a link. Not the best link, but even CW is catching on that O6 is bad news.

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                      • #26
                        So glad I happened upon this thread, I love my tuna - about four times a week - and Mrs Fist had been worrying about it for a while. Phew!
                        The Primal Journey of Mr and Mrs Fist
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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by JohnoNZ View Post
                          Check out my Facebook page to find out more about my chosen sport and don't forget to click "like":
                          I guess you're the man hanging off the sides. Very cool. I don't get to see sidecars much - I drove my Triumph Dayto 955 to Laguna-Seca Raceway last month to see Lorenzo make the race boring.

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                          • #28
                            By far the best tuna I've tried is Wild Planet. It has over 3 g omega-3 in each can for the albacore and is minimal mercury. It is line caught and very young tuna so it has less contamination. And it tastes great! It is cooked in the (BPA-free) can so the oil that's in the can is actual fish oil. Just mix it in and eat. I like to put lemon, capers, onions, and celery. That's how my daughter likes it too. I get the salt-free because I like add my own seasonings and capers which makes the regular salt-added too salty to me. At Whole Paycheck, it's 3.39/can or 2.99 on sale where I am. I don't consider that bad, especially for the nutrition in it. I just looked on Amazon and it breaks down to 2.77/can when you order six cans. Vitacost has it too. Highly recommend...and at least you know it tastes way better and is less contaminated.

                            ETA: As a side note, I know that cillakat (Katherine) mentions that more DHA than EPA is what's found in nature. That's exactly the case with this tuna. One can has 2320 mg DHA and 720 mg EPA.
                            Last edited by ShannonPA-S; 08-26-2010, 11:03 AM.

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