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  • #31
    1



    I hear you. I'm beginning to think most of my friends are paid lobbyists for ADM or Cargill. I don't preach to them, or even advertize the fact I'm eating primally, but when they get wind, the exhortations begin. I really don't know motivates them to behave this way, except, perhaps to assuage their own cognitive dissonance.

    I do have one friend who gets it, though, and she's an MD (specializes in nutrition, at that). In fact she's been eating this way for years (way before I saw the light.) But she is literally the only one.

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    • #32
      1



      gn, it was funny to read your post because that sounds just like how I approach religion with people I don't see eye to eye with! I don't go around preaching my lifestyle to anyone, but there are some people who see me changing physically and want to know what "magic pill" I've been popping. It's only when I tell them what the PB lifestyle entails that they turn on me and start judging. If I had told them all that I was on some new drug, they'd say "sign me up!"

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      • #33
        1

        Jeffrey, I started a thread a few days ago with a link to Jimmy Moore's blog of "Low-Carb Doctors" in the US. If your friend doesn't mind, you can send her info to Jimmy and he'll update the list.


        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...w-Carb-Doctors

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        • #34
          1



          You know guys, I think it comes to a point where it's just simpler to say that we are gluten intolerant and have issues with blood sugar levels.


          Example: I can handle some sugar some times, but that X meal would drive my sugar off the roof / has too much gluten, and as much as we would love to have it, we can't. (Look envious)


          Kind of like saying; I'm, not religious, BUT I'm spiritual, in a very religious workplace.


          Otherwise, people *will* keep looking at us thinking we have issues with ourselves, our coworkers or the company. And we want to avoid that.

          “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
          "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
          "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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          • #35
            1



            Just tell them you're on a special new kind of diet, but you had to sign a non-disclosure agreement in order to get it. If they persist, you can call up Mark and tell him to charge them $499 for a copy of PB.

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            • #36
              1



              @Nick: LMAO! I love your idea, that's the least we can do for Mark!


              @SS: I've been contemplating about using blood sugar issues as the reason too. Come to think of it, I found out about low-carb diets and MDA when I went on a sugar binge one afternoon and I realized it was so not normal.

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              • #37
                1



                LOL! Nick, my favorite response yet!

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                • #38
                  1



                  Serial Sinner, that is a great suggestion, and one that I've resorted to recently after haven gotten tired of being constantly named a 'no-carb dieter' in public.


                  It seems a healthy lifestyle, especially a noncorfming one, can make people feel uncomfortably guilty with their own eating hapbits, and singling you out is one easy way to cope.

                  Keep it up, tphillips, it'll only be so long before they start seeing the light. and even if this never happens, it comes down to remembering that you are benefitting. Hey, at least you tried to tell them, you'll just have to reap the beneifts of longevity, energy, and strength by yourself.


                  Ive tried to convert family, but am now just focusing on appearing to be normal in college, where weeekend destressor #1 is beer.

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                  • #39
                    1



                    My friends are generally supportive of my decision, but aren't very tactful about it. It hasn't been until recently (after dropping 60 lbs) that they've started to put stock in what I say. I am usually offered some sort of extra tasty treat and refuse it, and they say "Oh, that's right. You're not eating High Fructose Corn Death anymore." Then they laugh and consume. I know the intent is to make fun of me about being up in arms about HFCS... but seriously?


                    Sadly, a majority of the people who notice a difference ask me about it, and when I tell them they get a look of horror on their face... like not having bread and pasta is akin to murder or something. I hear "What you've done is amazing, I could never do it though..." Grow some damned willpower people! =)

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                    • #40
                      1



                      darienx, that's so funny about the "high fructose corn death" becuase my husband basically did the same thing to me today. I was telling him how all the "sneaky" names for sugar really bugged me, like "organic cane juice." Really? Just say sugar.


                      So he flipped over a package of dried fruit in the store today and I asked, "What's in it?" and he said, "Sugar, and death" without even hesitating. So funny.


                      As far as my friends go, they also do the "I couldn't do that" thing... but they understand that I'm full-force with it and are okay with it. I think because several of them are overweight and have tried several fad diets, presenting it to them as, "I'm trying an experiment" (even though I know this is lifelong and I'm in it for the whole trip) makes them view it more positively.


                      Funny thing though... they waffle back and forth between "man, I can't eat that because I'd die"(fat) and "wow, look at you all healthy" (stuff like subbing grated cauliflower for rice) in a matter of minutes. It's really funny to listen to them.


                      We had family visiting for 5 days and I thought surely issues would come up, but they didn't.

                      For breakfast when we cooked for them I made scrambled eggs, bacon, berries, and grits (carby but I didn't eat any and they like it). No one cared that I wasn't eating grits.


                      Then for dinner we cooked burgers (I ate mine with no bun -w/fork and knife- and no one seemed to notice), "potato" salad made with cauliflower instead of spuds... which EVERYone raved over, roasted asparagus, and salad. Their only grains were the buns and again I didn't eat the bread.


                      Restaurants were no problem... there's always something primal on the menu even if it's just a grilled chicken salad, and most places will be happy to substitute steamed veggies for potatoes or other starchy sides. Again, no one seems to care other than the "Why aren't you eating the free bread?" thing (outback steakhouse, olive garden, places with those fluffy rolls, etc)

                      Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

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                      • #41
                        1



                        Luckily the people I live with don't tend to notice what I'm eating (shared home, all cook our own stuff). However one of my good friends is on a low fat diet - eating marshmallows and microwaved weightwatchers meals. She's adamant that it worked for her before, and it's better than non-weightwatchers micro-rubbish (just). But I find it hard to smile when she brings home her latest fat free discovery (mutant yoghurts, sweets, etc).


                        What I'm struggling with is my own weak will plus people's assumptions. I'm at the point where I try to keep primal but can easily cave in to "just one" sweet, or bun, or sandwich. What I need is someone to *not* offer! But then when I'm with a certain person, they'll want to go out for food even if I've got stuff in. But they don't want a decent restaurant, they want subway etc.


                        Argh!!


                        I end up being really antisocial and eating my food awkwardly before we leave and get their sugar rush sorted!


                        I have told people that I feel much better like this, but it goes over their heads.

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                        • #42
                          1



                          I wonder if it's geographical to an extent. I'm in Florida and southerners seem to take serious offense to anyone refusing starches or fried foods in all their glorious forms. I grew up on the west coast though (ah, the land of farmer's markets and grass-fed beef!), and can't imagine anybody over there raising an eyebrow over my current diet.


                          Probably the most frustrating thing is people asking me straight out for advice because they have seen me get fitter, yet balking at what they hear. I do have a very take it or leave it attitude and always preface it with "what works for me..." Another person asked me today what I was doing to be getting in shape and, instead of going through the whole spiel, this time I just said "walking more and eating less" and left it at that. It is seriously a daily thing in my work environment, as I work with roughly 50 people in a clinic setting.

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                          • #43
                            1



                            Well, seeing as I just started reading this stuff recently, I haven't had to think about it that much, and haven't eaten out with my friends that much...

                            The few times I did eat out with friends, I didn't really watch what I eat, because it was only one or two weekend meals, and most of the food I ate I was cooking/bringing to work. I haven't fully committed myself to Primal, I'm still just... dabbling...


                            But no one said anything yesterday when we went to Chipotle and I had chicken w/fajita veggies in a bowl, no rice or beans or tortilla...


                            I don't know how my friends would react if I committed fully and started being strict about it (though I am not sure I ever will go all the way). One of my friends introduced me to MDA, so she would never say anything, but others, I dunno.


                            What's hard for me right now, even in my "dabbling" is my parents... for example, breakfast is something easy to change, and I've basically changed that all the way, no cereal or bagels or whatever, only oatmeal rarely... most of the time I've been doing eggs. 3 eggs, scrambled usually, sometimes different... but my parents think I am killing myself doing this and need to cut back on the eggs.


                            And both my parents work in medical fields, my dad being a physician, which of course makes it hard to argue. And my dad especially is one who doesn't like to argue... of course, his family having a history of high blood pressure and his brother passing away because of it also is a big factor. So they see the eggs as something that will kill me if I eat them so frequently...


                            It doesn't help that I'm the only one in my family who is kind of flabby, so my words regarding eating are obviously taken less seriously. They think all I think about is food food food, and yeah, maybe I think too much about food, but at least now I'm trying to be healthy...


                            Hmmm...

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                            • #44
                              1



                              A friend of mine, who I was seeing after 2 months, saw me today and went, "Geez, I didn't notice, but you've lost a lot of weight!" And I said, "Yes, mostly through diet - I've been low-carbing." I was hoping he'd ask me more about the diet but he didn't and immediately changed the topic. But I told him to read GCBC. So, my scale has been lying indeed.

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                              • #45
                                1



                                Shazkar, many of us made the mistake of talking too much about primal at the beginning and therefore alienating our family/friends with the topic.


                                You are in the ideal position to suggest your parents to take a look at Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes:


                                http://tinyurl.com/2bhtou


                                It is backed up by medical research and will probably make them reconsider current approach to nutrition.

                                “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
                                "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                                "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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