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  • Raw eggs?

    In my pre-primal days, I was never one to skimp on cookie dough because of the raw eggs in it. I mean, the risk was definitely worth the pleasure of gummy, sweet, cookie dough

    Now in my primal days--I'm trying to continue my smoothie habit without the regular dose of dairy in greek yogurt. I've read some people do raw eggs--and I did this morning. It worked out great for me (taste/texture-wise) My question is, does anyone have some good knowledge to share about eating eggs raw versus cooked?

    I've read the odds of getting salmonella in an egg is 1 in 20,000 and I'm generally inclined not to worry about it, but I don't want to jump into something stupid. Also, if I need to do anything special to an egg before eating raw I want to know that too!

    Thanks

  • #2
    It's said that if you do it you shouldn't eat the white. Raw egg whites supposedly interfere with the uptake of biotin. Whether that's true I don't know.

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    • #3
      Go for it. I really don't think there's a huge difference one way or the other. I throw them in my milkshakes to thicken them up. I don't go out of my way to eat an egg raw (lest I have a craving for such), but I'm certainly not afraid to eat them raw either.

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      • #4
        youre much better off just eating cooked eggs.


        Pros of raw eggs:?

        Cons of raw eggs:

        -risk of food poisoning
        -presence of avidin in the whites..... blocks B vitamin/biotin absorbtion
        -presence of lysozyme in the whites.....possible inflammatory agent on the gut

        cooking eggs bypasses these risks.
        Last edited by lmyers04; 08-03-2010, 11:05 AM. Reason: spelling!

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        • #5
          The healthiest way to consume eggs is to eat them raw. The more the egg is cooked the more prone the cholesterol in the yoke is to being oxidized. Also when heated the protein structure is changed, this could be the reason when people develop an alleregy when consuming eggs.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jamie View Post
            The healthiest way to consume eggs is to eat them raw. The more the egg is cooked the more prone the cholesterol in the yoke is to being oxidized. Also when heated the protein structure is changed, this could be the reason when people develop an alleregy when consuming eggs.
            This is interesting. I have never heard of this. Can you attach a link that explains this process?

            Also, how is the oxidation of fat in yolks different from, lets say, oxidation of butter in a pan?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jamie View Post
              The healthiest way to consume eggs is to eat them raw. The more the egg is cooked the more prone the cholesterol in the yoke is to being oxidized. Also when heated the protein structure is changed, this could be the reason when people develop an alleregy when consuming eggs.
              +1

              I've had alot of raw egg yolks, never gotten sick once. But be sure that your eggs come from a healthy farm who take care of the chickens, let em run around, etc..
              That way the risk is even lower than with conventional eggs (which have a pretty damn low risk anyway)

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              • #8
                I don't think eating eggs raw will hurt you - but your body can use more of the nutrients in the egg when it's cooked.

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                • #9
                  The only downside to eating raw vs cooked is the protein is not as bioavailable..........basically we're only absorbing around 50 % of the protein compared to around 90 % cooked. The comment from jamie I believe was in regards to oxidized cholesterol. If the yolk is exposed to heat and air it will oxidize and are formally called oxysterols and not something you want to be consuming on a continual basis. It's probably a good idea to eat yolks that are poached, soft boiled or sunnyside up or raw compared with scrambled or hard boiled........this is probably being very anal, but nevertheless it happens. Compared to dairy and butter, eggs have anywhere from 100% to 500% more cholesterol and that's why eggs should probably be treated a little more delicately that butter.....I would need to do some research, but I believe what I have said here is pretty accurate.
                  Whether you think you can..... or you think you can't..... your 100 % correct.

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                  • #10
                    Interesting feedback all! When I do cook eggs, I boil them or fry them and always leave the yolk runny. Yum! Looks like I don't have to worry about oxidation there. Thanks for the tip!

                    I do get tired of the flavor of eggs though, and they make for great flavorless protein in a smoothie (I don't care for whey, and I'm trying to limit dairy), but if I'm only absorbing 50%...that sort of defeats the purpose. Chefgerry--do you have a source for the limited bioavailability of raw eggs?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Chefgerry View Post
                      The only downside to eating raw vs cooked is the protein is not as bioavailable..........basically we're only absorbing around 50 % of the protein compared to around 90 % cooked. The comment from jamie I believe was in regards to oxidized cholesterol. If the yolk is exposed to heat and air it will oxidize and are formally called oxysterols and not something you want to be consuming on a continual basis. It's probably a good idea to eat yolks that are poached, soft boiled or sunnyside up or raw compared with scrambled or hard boiled........this is probably being very anal, but nevertheless it happens. Compared to dairy and butter, eggs have anywhere from 100% to 500% more cholesterol and that's why eggs should probably be treated a little more delicately that butter.....I would need to do some research, but I believe what I have said here is pretty accurate.
                      thank you Chef, yes it looks accurate and your paragraph sort of refreshed my memory......as this sounds vaguely familiar.....like something I've read before, but couldnt recall it. Anyways, thanks for explaining!

                      I have to admit I love a fried egg though. And I love omelets. Its the only way I eat eggs, as runny yolks simply are not palatable to me. That being said, I am on the low end of the egg-eating spectrum, about 4 a week, not daily at all, so thats good to know.

                      Jqbancroft: Yea it looks like as long as the white is fairly cooked, youre good to go!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jqbancroft View Post
                        Interesting feedback all! When I do cook eggs, I boil them or fry them and always leave the yolk runny. Yum! Looks like I don't have to worry about oxidation there. Thanks for the tip!

                        I do get tired of the flavor of eggs though, and they make for great flavorless protein in a smoothie (I don't care for whey, and I'm trying to limit dairy), but if I'm only absorbing 50%...that sort of defeats the purpose. Chefgerry--do you have a source for the limited bioavailability of raw eggs?
                        Here you go. http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/...tp://jerli.net http://ajpgi.physiology.org/cgi/cont...act/277/5/G935
                        Last edited by Chefgerry; 08-03-2010, 04:50 PM.
                        Whether you think you can..... or you think you can't..... your 100 % correct.

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                        • #13
                          I think you can only utilize about 20% of the protein in an egg even when it's cooked.

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                          • #14
                            The whites are hard to digest and then there is the whole avidin issue. Salmonella is only present on the shell so give them a good clean when you buy them to decrease your risk of illness. I would only eat the yolk raw in a smoothie and cook the whites. Otherwise its sunny side up, soft boiled or lightly scrambled for a treat.
                            "My mom made two dishes: Take it or Leave it." -- Stephen Wright, comedian

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