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  • Fit for human consumption?

    I was dog-sitting for my neighbours for a few days last week and the food they feed her got me intrigued. It's raw patties of ground up elk, cow, or bison, internal organs and bones and all. Sounds pretty good. It wasn't long before I started wondering how safe it would be for me to eat. Their website has this to say:

    We use the whole animal because the finely ground bones in whole animal raw food provide the proper balance of calcium and phosphorous. Whole animal food includes meat, bones, vital organs, heart, liver, lungs, kidneys and tripe - all the ingredients for full nutrition.

    Our high quality raw ground whole animal pet food is all Canadian and all natural - made from naturally-raised animals that come from local Saskatchewan farms where they are grazed, fed and cared for without any additives. From field to bowl, it's a natural process.
    It's the bones that concern me. I assume they're pretty close to powdered by the time they make it to the patties. There weren't any chunks that I could see. Could the human digestive system handle powdered bone? Could I be eating dog food in the near future?

    edit: I do plan on cooking the stuff as I'd cook regular ground beef.
    You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

  • #2
    Google 'prions'!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Primalchild View Post
      I was dog-sitting for my neighbours for a few days last week and the food they feed her got me intrigued. It's raw patties of ground up elk, cow, or bison, internal organs and bones and all. Sounds pretty good. It wasn't long before I started wondering how safe it would be for me to eat. Their website has this to say:



      It's the bones that concern me. I assume they're pretty close to powdered by the time they make it to the patties. There weren't any chunks that I could see. Could the human digestive system handle powdered bone? Could I be eating dog food in the near future?

      edit: I do plan on cooking the stuff as I'd cook regular ground beef.
      I am going to say that yes, everything would be fine mainly because I like the thought that some dude is out there eating dog food. I hate myself sometimes.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Rivvin View Post
        I am going to say that yes, everything would be fine mainly because I like the thought that some dude is out there eating dog food. I hate myself sometimes.
        Actual 'LOL'!

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        • #5
          If the slaughtering process is as clean as it is for animals intended for human consumption, I fail to see the difference. If organ meats are good for you, I'd rather be eating them all ground up than have to look at a pair of kidneys.
          You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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          • #6
            I say go for it. Only pansies get vCJD anyway; a good set of deep squats will cure it.

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            • #7
              I'd try it; honestly, after reading the ingredients of several animal foods, I am starting to believe that some dog foods may actually be cleaner and safer to eat than human food.

              I doubt that HFCS, sucralose, xanthan gum, and all those other yummy goodies that appeal to humans appeal equally to dogs.
              --
              Here it is, your moment of zen.

              It's a no brainer: The journal of the cerebelum

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              • #8
                Originally posted by chronyx View Post
                I say go for it. Only pansies get vCJD anyway; a good set of deep squats will cure it.
                Just spell it out for me, smartypants. What makes this meat more dangerous than supermarket meat?
                You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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                • #9
                  Well I actually want you to read the same info I did so you can make your own mind up and i'm not passing on second-hand information.

                  A proteinaceous infectious particle, or prion, is an infectious agent composed primarily of protein. Prions are the cause of a number of diseases in a variety of mammals, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, also known as "mad cow disease") in cattle and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. All known prion diseases affect the structure of the brain or other neural tissue and all are currently untreatable and universally fatal.

                  Current research suggests that the primary method of infection in animals is through ingestion. It is thought that prions may be deposited in the environment through the remains of dead animals and via urine, saliva, and other body fluids. They may then linger in the soil by binding to clay and other minerals.

                  Infectious particles possessing nucleic acid are dependent upon it to direct their continued replication. Prions, however, are infectious by their effect on normal versions of the protein. Sterilizing prions therefore involves the denaturation of the protein to a state where the molecule is no longer able to induce the abnormal folding of normal proteins. Prions are generally quite resistant to proteases, heat, radiation, and formalin treatments, although their infectivity can be reduced by such treatments. Effective prion decontamination relies upon protein hydrolysis or reduction or destruction of protein tertiary structure. Examples include bleach, caustic soda, and strong acidic detergents such as LpH. 134°C (274°F) for 18 minutes in a pressurized steam autoclave may not be enough to deactivate the agent of disease.Ozone sterilization is currently being studied as a potential method for prion denature and deactivation. Renaturation of a completely denatured prion to infectious status has not yet been achieved, however partially denatured prions can be renatured to an infective status under certain artificial conditions.
                  Last edited by chronyx; 07-27-2010, 02:07 PM.

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                  • #10
                    I appreciate the info and I came up with the same thing when I googled prions, but I'm still not getting the point. You've bolded information about prion decontamination, but I still don't see why the animals in this pet food are at any higher risk for prions than the ones we get nicely ground up in cellophane and styrofoam packages. After all, mad cow disease was found in feedlot operations, wasn't it? And I haven't seen you advise against eating those animals.
                    You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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                    • #11
                      They are mostly found in the spinal cord and the brain, I believe. If they've minced that lot up too I certainly would not eat it.

                      See how they have to be destroyed - there wouldn't be anything edible left! They are extremely nasty, little-understood things...

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                      • #12
                        Shut up and eat it already.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Primalchild View Post
                          It wasn't long before I started wondering how safe it would be for me to eat.
                          I'd be chary of them myself, because I don't think there's any way of knowing the meat hasn't been declared unfit for human consumption.

                          It's the bones that concern me. I assume they're pretty close to powdered by the time they make it to the patties. There weren't any chunks that I could see. Could the human digestive system handle powdered bone?
                          I suspect the answer to that one is yes.

                          In the 16th century Alvar Nuņez Cabeza De Vaca found hunter-gatherers eating just that in what would now be Louisiana. He attributes it to their hunger - he reckons they would eat just about anything they could. Maybe - I guess he was there, which I wasn't, and in a better position to judge that. However, I do wonder whether they were after the minerals in the bone in some not fully conscious manner. Here's the relevant extract:

                          Dorantes remained only a few days with those Indians and then escaped. Castillo and Estevanico went inland to the Iguaces. All those people are archers and well built, although not as tall as those we had left behind us, and they have the nipple and lip perforated. Their principal food are two or three kinds of roots, which they hunt for all over the land; they are very unhealthy, inflating, and it takes two days to roast them. Many are very bitter, and with all that they are gathered with difficulty. But those people are so much exposed to starvation that these roots are to them indispensable and they walk two and three leagues to obtain them. Now and then they kill deer and at times get a fish, but this is so little and their hunger so great that they eat spiders and ant eggs, worms, lizards and salamanders and serpents, also vipers the bite of which is deadly. They swallow earth and wood, and all they can get, the dung of deer and more things I do not mention; and I verily believe, from what I saw, that if there were any stones in the country they would eat them also. They preserve the bones of the fish they eat, of snakes and other animals, to pulverize them and eat the powder.
                          http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/reso...one/cabeza.htm

                          I'd be interested to know how common bone-eating is among different groups of people. I think one would need a very wide knowledge of the sources to have any idea of that.

                          But I suppose bone-broth is a tastier option for those with cooking pots.

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                          • #14
                            Oh, okay. I will find out if they grind up spine and brain. If not, chow time.
                            You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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                            • #15
                              That seems reasonable

                              Let us know before you have your first (Last??) supper...

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