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Interesting Article about Massai Lunch

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  • Interesting Article about Massai Lunch

    Saw this article today and thought it was kind of a fun read and fit in nicely here: http://www.saveur.com/article/Travels/Rite-of-Passage

    Notice how important the fat is

  • #2
    Thanks.

    I noticed the liver was eaten raw, too, which many peoples seem to do.

    She doesn't say what the Moran did with the "Several pounds of masticated greenery, still damp with bile, [which] were extracted from the stomach". I expect it went in the broth, since she says "this broth is prized for its medicinal value because any nutrients the sheep consumed are transferred to it [as it] cooks".

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    • #3
      I didn't think of that, Lewis, but I think you are right about the broth. It doesn't really sound like my cup of tea (wakka wakka) but it's very interesting to consider!

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      • #4
        I love articles like this. Great post.

        I am very interested in the way isolated societies eat or did eat. Most of them arent really truly isolated but still eat their traditional diets and dont have much of a western influence.

        Other than the Masai does anybody know any other groups that eat their traditional diets? Because for example, the Tokelau in New Zealand no longer eat their traditional diet of coconut and fish. But now have more of a western influence and thus dont eat their traditional diets.

        Thanks

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        • #5
          It's interesting you mention the Tokelau and their diet because of a couple articles I just recently read regarding their statistics towards Diabetes and Heart Health issues. Basically, the westernization of their diet has led to a completely traceable shift in their amount of diabetes diagnoses and heart failures.

          Here is the initial article: http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.co...ackground.html

          I am still trying to find the one from last month, but I can't seem to locate it ;(

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          • #6
            Yep, great article. I read that some article as well and Taubes mentioned it in his book Good Calories, Bad Calories.

            But yeah, im very interested in reading about stuff like this.

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            • #7
              Lots of vitamin C in raw organs.
              Whether you think you can..... or you think you can't..... your 100 % correct.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by foodaddict View Post
                Other than the Masai does anybody know any other groups that eat their traditional diets? Because for example, the Tokelau in New Zealand no longer eat their traditional diet of coconut and fish. But now have more of a western influence and thus dont eat their traditional diets.
                These people would:

                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sentinelese_people

                They have resisted contact and have lived the same way for tens of thousands of years. Pretty interesting.

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                • #9
                  U might also look into the indigenous peoples of New Guinea....very primitive.
                  They used to call me No Neck, but now I have one.

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                  • #10
                    I tried to tell my family at dinner about how the Masai prove a lot of CW thinking is bogus... they seemed to think that the Masai were adopted uniquely to their diet. My thought process is that if we've been around for say, 1 million years, is it more reasonable to think that we ate one way for 99.9% of the time, then adapted to grains 10k years ago, then the Masai adapted _back_, or is it more reasonble to go with what worked 99.9% of the time?

                    FWIW, our actual dinner was fresh salad with homemade dressing, green beans, grilled hanger steak, and strawberry desserts. There were also some beans and corn and cake, but I think my message is sinking in subconciously.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by foodaddict View Post
                      Other than the Masai does anybody know any other groups that eat their traditional diets?
                      There are people in New Guinea still living on sago and wild game. The Penang in Borneo are probably eating much as they did, too:

                      http://www.survivalinternational.org/tribes/penan

                      And there should still be isolated Amazonian groups. Only two years ago there were reports of one that was supposedly "uncontacted":

                      http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/7426794.stm

                      Things can move fast there, though. In the past, Amazonian tribes have been overwhelmed rapidly by business/political forces - and, actually, by "missionaries", too. In some cases it's through ignorance; sometimes it even seems likely that they knew what they were doing, and there'd been some kind of collusion going on. It often seems to be strange "fundamentalist" groups at work rather than mainstream churches like, say, the Roman Catholics. Norman Lewis is rather horrifyingly interesting on this:

                      Based on his experiences with missionaries in Southeast Asia and Central and Latin America, Lewis has written a scathing account of how some missionary sects deal with indigenous peoples in their bid for the conquest of souls. He cites the creation of fear and the establishment of dependency upon goods which, without becoming wage-earners, the Indians could not procure. As native peoples are hurried through the process of acculturation, Indian customs and ways of life, ceremonies, art, music, and dance are often lost only to be replaced by illness, apathy, and forced labor.
                      http://www.amazon.com/Missionaries-A...dp/0330354450/

                      Some of these people seem to lack a sense of guilt, and if they do there's no point in telling them they can be forgiven. So raising guilt - what's meant by "creation of fear" in the book description, I guess - is one of the first things that they work on.

                      Dr Kamler has some notes on some Amazonian Indians that are quite something. A little boy comes to him, having nearly severed his own thumb with a carelessly wielded machete. The boy isn't in a state of panic at all, and Kamler suggests that in an environment that hostile you simply can't afford to be:

                      http://www.amazon.com/Surviving-Extr...dp/0143034510/

                      Kamler accepts a draught of chew-and-spit-fermented drink, but actually balks when offered the head of a rodent - the most esteemed part - by the boy's grandfather with whom he strikes up a relationship. Kamler says turning down a gift of food like this could have fatal consequences among these people, but the grandfather - a quite extraordinary man, as it turns out - had had a fair bit of contact with outsiders and made allowances.

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                      • #12
                        Wow, that is a fantastic article. I'm really glad I took the time to read it, and I'm really glad you took the time to post it. Thank you.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks Lewis.....nice.
                          Whether you think you can..... or you think you can't..... your 100 % correct.

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                          • #14
                            Fantastic post Lewis. Great information in this thread.

                            Also, you guys think its safe to visit places like this? Like, how do or would they react when foreigners come to their villages?
                            Last edited by foodaddict; 07-28-2010, 01:34 AM.

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