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  • I am cutting out Nuts

    Hi there,

    i am cutting out nuts because of this: http://www.curetoothdecay.com/Tooth_...ooth_decay.htm
    -> nuts, grains, legumes have phytic acid in it which is bad, nuts have anti-nutrients

    Here another post about it:
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...347#post115347

    I only care about health, and this article suggests that it's more healthy to eat no nuts, so i am cutting them out.

    But i am posting it here because i am interested in some opinions.

    greeets! mike
    My Journal Road To Sixpack (with Pictures): http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread106846.html

  • #2
    Great post mike, also nuts have ridiculous amounts of omega 6 (except chia and macadamia). That first link is very interesting, I skimmed it but will email to myself to read in more detail later.

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    • #3
      And overwhelming abundance, lack of seasonal limitations, ease (pre-shelled) of consumption here in modern times can make for an artificially high intake. Total elimination is NOT going to eliminate any single nutrient (you could get it elsewhere). But having the rare small handful of nuts won't kill ya, either. That said, I've run total elimination of nuts for a while now after an almond binge disagreed with my GI tract.

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      • #4
        good for you. they're overrated (not here though). all those anti-nutrients are a pain in the butt to reduce. notice i said reduce. you'll never eliminate them completely by soaking/roasting. you'll have an easier time getting a good amt. of omega 3 without 'em too!
        Red meat is not bad for you. Now blue-green meat, that's bad for you! ~Tommy Smothers

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        • #5
          In this idea, is Flax seeds and Chia still a good omega3 source?

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          • #6
            I used to eat a shit ton of them, but I've been backing off too. Kind of a treat almost now for me.

            I went to see Inception last night (GREAT movie, by the way) and took in a small bag of almonds to munch on. Great food compared to the alternatives at the concession!

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            • #7
              yes, but they also contain anti-nutrients. your body has an easier time getting/absorbing omega 3 from animal sources.
              Red meat is not bad for you. Now blue-green meat, that's bad for you! ~Tommy Smothers

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              • #8
                Yeah i gave up nuts a while ago pretty much for the same reason..
                It confuses me when people make "primal" bread or cakes and stuff using almond or other nut flour thinkin its healthier...Personally if im gonna treat myself i'd probably make a cake/bread out of gluten free rice flour or something...some carbs now and then wont hurt, plus i'd be avoiding the rancid fats, omega 6 and anti-nutrients in something made from nut flour.

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                • #9
                  I gave up nuts some time ago too; for various reasons. If you ever miss that crunchy nutty texture, coconut chips are a gift from the flying spaghetti squash monster.
                  --
                  Here it is, your moment of zen.

                  It's a no brainer: The journal of the cerebelum

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cerebelumsdayoff View Post
                    I gave up nuts some time ago too; for various reasons. If you ever miss that crunchy nutty texture, coconut chips are a gift from the flying spaghetti squash monster.
                    How do you make coconut chips?
                    I suppose I need to stop eating nuts too. They are defianlty a trigger food for me. Dang, I just love them so much.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Flax seeds, even fresh organic and ground tend to give me acne. So there is likely a lot of anti-nutrient action going on. And I don't quite trust massive doses of ALA. Mike Eades says that it interferes with important functions of linoleic acid, though clearly it is good for blocking conversion of LA to AA in a diet with tons of omega 6, which is most people's diets due to the vegetable oils and peanut butter. Also ALA is highly reactive in itself due to its unsaturated nature.

                      Dr. Cordain has been pretty down on chia seeds lately. I'm not quite sure what to make of the "debate".

                      Editor's note: "The Chia Controversy" is based on an post published on healthcentral.com by David Mendosa, a writer from Boulder, Colorado, in which Mendosa cites the work of Dr. Wayne Coates, Professor Emeritus from the Office of Arid Lands Studies at the University of Arizona, Tucson, and a chia seeds researcher. Mendosa's post is in response to Dr. Cordain's article on Chia Seeds in a recent edition of The Paleo Diet Update (Volume 6, issue 7. There is also a follow-up article in volume 6, issue 8 - both of which are available in our web store.). Mr. Mendosa and Dr. Cordain recently exchanged emails on the subject of chia seeds, and Dr. Cordain has written a rebuttal in response to Mendosa's post and subsequent responses by Dr. Coates.

                      According to Mr. Mendosa's post: "Wayne Coates, Ph.D., is professor emeritus in the office of arid lands studies at the University of Arizona, Tucson. Dr. Coates has researched chia seeds for three decades and wrote the definitive book on the subject, Chia: Rediscovering a Forgotten Crop of the Aztecs (The University of Arizona Press, 2005). A link to Mr. Medosa's post is included below.


                      Dear Dr. Cordain,

                      In my post yesterday at HealthCentral Dr. Wayne Coates addresses your concerns about chia seeds. My readers and I would appreciate your rebuttal.
                      Please see "The Chia Controversy" at http://www.healthcentral.com/diabete...ia-controversy.
                      Best regards,
                      David Mendosa


                      Hi David,

                      Good to hear from you and many thanks for your kind words about my work.
                      I stand by my statement that phytic acid impairs absorption of divalent ions in a dose-dependent manner. This data is unassailable, and has been recognized in the nutritional community for more than 50 years. Hence, much of the calcium, iron, zinc and magnesium which on paper appear to be present in chia seeds are not available for absorption in vivo. Consequently, chia seeds are not good sources of these nutrients in living humans. In a typical western diet in which nutrients come from a variety of foods, particularly animal foods, these nutritional shortcomings in chia seeds likely are of little consequence. However, if chia seeds are consumed as staple foods, comprising a substantial percentage of the caloric intake, overall nutrition would suffer similar to other human populations in which seeds (cereal grains, legumes) comprise more than half of their daily energy1.
                      I also stand by my previous statement:
                      A recent review of all human chia supplementation studies concluded: "There is limited evidence supporting the efficacy of Salvia hispanica for any indication; thus far, only two clinical studies have examined the effects of Salvia hispanica on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (including body weight). One study showed some effects on some CVD risk factors, while the other did not. Neither study showed any effects of Salvia hispanica on weight loss" 2.
                      Despite animal data showing certain positive health effects of chia seed consumption, (which I listed in my article – see volume 6, issue 7 of this newsletter), randomized controlled human trials have been unable to replicate these results. Consequently, until further clinical trials are conducted for humans, no good experimental data can support the notion that chia seed consumption has therapeutic value.
                      The preliminary data in both humans and animals suggesting pro-inflammatory and pro-allergic effects with chronic high level chia seed consumption are problematic and should not be ignored. The study showing dramatic increases in IgE in animals was not statistically significant because the sample size was so small that it lacked statistical power to demonstrate a treatment effect. This is an experiment that could easily be replicated with an “n” of 10 to 20 animals. If Dr. Coates is so confident that "Until there are definitive studies that prove chia is unhealthy to consume, which I do not believe will ever be the case, . . .", perhaps he should replicate this experiment with a larger sample size.
                      I remember a similar circumstance a few years back when a number of well known acne researchers confidently stated that "diet had virtually nothing to do with acne." Research from our laboratory first proposed that diet was the primary environmental trigger of acne; further we outlined the mechanisms involved3, 4. Our work was later confirmed in a number of recent randomized controlled trials5, 6.
                      Finally, in humans ALA by itself has little or no anti-inflammatory effects. It is the hepatic conversion of ALA to long chain omega 3 fatty acids (20:5n3 and 22:6n3) which are anti-inflammatory. Because less than 5% of ALA is converted to 20:5n3 and less than 0.5% is converted to 22:6n37, a better strategy than "to continue heaping chia seeds on most everything that I eat, including eggs, salad, and meat," would be to eat 100 grams of salmon every other day.
                      Cordially,
                      Loren Cordain, Ph.D., Professor
                      I agree, I don't trust any seed. Nuts are likely less problematic if soaked, but then they still have a bunch of omega 6. Properly soaked, lightly toasted macadamias may well be a great choice for an occasional snack.
                      Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

                      Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

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                      • #12
                        @selah: you can buy coconut chips at the store which i find to be cheaper and easier. you can break open a coconut (pain in the rear), drain the water, break off the coconut meat and dehydrate or put in the oven to dry. my coconut crackin' days are long gone. such a mess;-)
                        Red meat is not bad for you. Now blue-green meat, that's bad for you! ~Tommy Smothers

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by shannon View Post
                          @selah: you can buy coconut chips at the store which i find to be cheaper and easier. you can break open a coconut (pain in the rear), drain the water, break off the coconut meat and dehydrate or put in the oven to dry. my coconut crackin' days are long gone. such a mess;-)
                          Thanks for the heads up.
                          I already make my own coconut kefir so I have the fresh coconuts....but yeah, pain in the @ to crack those babies open! I've never seen coconut chips at the store.I'll look closer.

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                          • #14
                            I've cut out nuts too. I never liked them, any of them (except peanut butter...yes, I know). I don't think they were contributing to my health in any way and possibly working against me. I personally am becoming skeptical of just about every food except meat and some veg though so....

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                            • #15
                              Good call. I'm cutting way down on nuts, too, thanks to the O-6 content. I'm okay with a few macadamias or a spoonful of almond butter once or twice a week, but no more of the everyday nuts on my BAS.
                              Nightlife ~ Chronicles of Less Urban Living, Fresh from In the Night Farm ~ Idaho's Primal Farm! http://inthenightlife.wordpress.com/

                              Latest post: Stop Being Stupid

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