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  • Sudden Egg Sensitivity

    So I've been Primal since March and because it's an excellent source of protein, etc, and it's low carb I've been having eggs for breakfast virtually every day since then. I've also been mixing it up in terms of omelettes, scrambled, and hard-boiled options. This is relatively cheap and quick to make so I haven't really explored any other breakfast options (I can't have yogurt because the hormones in dairy directly and quickly affect my skin.)

    A week ago, however, I had an omelette for breakfast as normal and began to feel sick as I was eating it and couldn't finish it. A few days later I tried hard-boiled eggs and felt like I was going to vomit for about a half-hour directly after.

    So, my question to you guys is: Is it possible to have developed a sensitivity to eggs after having eaten them practically straight for 4+ months straight, or is there something else going on?

    Note: the eggs were Omega-3 but not free-range because there are none in the area that I can get for any reasonable price. (I live in downtown Montreal.)

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Sounds like a case of Bad Eggs..... That would explain the sudden onset of nausea following eating them. Even under the best of conditions, eggs can become contaminated. Sometimes if you are getting them from a local farmer, there could be a question of freshness. Rare, but it happens. It's not normal to feel sick after eating eggs. I suspect something wrong with the eggs, Not you.

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    • #3
      possibly. i'd be willing to bet that you're just sick of eating so many. personally i don't believe in developing sensitivities to nourishing foods such as eggs. i'm sure i'll be getting hell for this reply:-) just skip 'em for awhile. you'll miss 'em and come cryin' back. i was like that a few years ago. once i went without for a few weeks i was ok.
      Red meat is not bad for you. Now blue-green meat, that's bad for you! ~Tommy Smothers

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Artemis View Post
        So I've been Primal since March and because it's an excellent source of protein, etc, and it's low carb I've been having eggs for breakfast virtually every day since then. I've also been mixing it up in terms of omelettes, scrambled, and hard-boiled options. This is relatively cheap and quick to make so I haven't really explored any other breakfast options (I can't have yogurt because the hormones in dairy directly and quickly affect my skin.)
        It's absolutely possible. A roommate of mine in college was very allergic to dairy and her only reaction was an upset stomach or occasionally, if enough was ingested, vomiting.

        Anyway, here is another mda'er that developed an egg allergy at 21 after a lifetime of eating eggs without incident.

        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...ht=egg-allergy



        iherb referral code CIL457- $5 off first order

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        • #5
          A year or so ago I read a book, title I can't recall, by a NIH scientist who could pinpoint when, where and how he became severely reactive to eggs late in life, a coincidence of momentary vulnerability and those egg proteins being present at the moment and getting into the wrong place at the wrong time. He reacted ever after; hopefully your intolerance might be temporary.

          It is possible to order testing for egg sensitivity from Enterolab, a COLA (AMA and AAFP) approved lab, and the physician who developed the tests, Dr. Fine, will provide an interpretation.

          https://www.enterolab.com/

          https://www.enterolab.com/StaticPages/TestInfo.aspx

          But your own observations in testing your reactions yourself over time and with different batches of eggs might be the best indication.

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          • #6
            First, I would suspect the eggs themselves. If you're willing to experiment on yourself, buy new eggs...exactly the same brand, and see what happens with those when you eat them.

            If you react, and are willing to do further experimentation on yourself, do whatever you can to get farm fresh (laid within ten days), cage free eggs. If you love them that much...even if you have to drive a ways to get them.

            I developed an egg sensitivity around the age of 19. Recently, I've tried eating farm fresh cage free eggs and don't seem to have a problem with those. They were expensive and I was driving like 2 hours to get them so I'm going to experiment on myself soon and try just cage free from the health food store near me.

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            • #7
              You can develop an allergy, I've read somewhere that laying off for 6 weeks (dang long time) or so will make the sensitivity go away. Good luck.

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              • #8
                This has happened to me a few times - half way through my eggs I'd get really nauseous and feel like I'm dangerously close to vomiting and I typically don't have a weak stomach. Taking a break from eggs has (so far) done the trick for me. I can usually go back to them after about a week. I always get my eggs from the same source so they may not be as farm fresh and free run as advertised!

                It might be hard to try eggs from another source with the nausea association so I'd suggest taking a break and then trying them from another source.

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                • #9
                  Darthfriendly has a good suggestion. Food allergies are based on a build up of the particular food causing the allergy. Layoff for 6-8 weeks, maybe less, and slowly reintroduce the offending food to see how you react.

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                  • #10
                    All right, thanks everyone - I really hope that it was just that batch of eggs (definitely possible), but I'm still going to lay off for at least a few weeks and then slowly go back to them and see what happens. Hopefully I'm not allergic/insensitive forever, because that would just be terrible.

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                    • #11
                      It is possible yes, the more often you eat something the more easy it is to become intolerant. Do you have any symptoms of a leaky gut like Crohns, IBS or any autoimmune disease? I developed a sudden intolerance to eggs a few years back, I get intense nasuea, cramping and vomiting.
                      My primal adventures:
                      http://foodfloraandfelines.blogspot.com/
                      Cooking, nutrition, gardening, foraging, preserving, photography

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                      • #12
                        Honestly, I'd only heard the names of those illnesses before and never bothered to look them up, but now that I see the list of symptoms they are quite daunting - I definitely identify with many of the symptoms for both leaky gut and IBS, although I don't think that's enough for an actual diagnosis. Do eggs affect these things or vice versa?

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                        • #13
                          Even if you are not especially sensivity, wheat and gluten can damage your intestinal tract to the point where it leaks, i.e. intestinal contents leak into your bloodstream.

                          http://www.plosone.org/article/info%...l.pone.0000687

                          Once the leakage occurs, various food proteins can leak into your bloodstream intact, through the breach created by the wheat damage. When they would ordinarily be digested and broken down first. Some of these intact proteins are treated by the body as "foreign invaders" as the body mounts an immune attack against them. And thus begins a "food intolerance."

                          An intolerance to eggs could develop in this manner, even though the initial damage was done by wheat.

                          There is another factor that could play a part as well. Sometimes before people adopt a Paleo type diet, while they eat a lot of wheat and inflammatory and reactive foods, their immune systems are essentially running all the time. And they get run down and don't mount a very intense immune response.

                          On a Paleo diet, as the gut heals and the immune system starts to recover, it is not unusual to find that it reacts much more strongly than before, especially to certain foods. This may be a sign of immune health, though it may be bothersome to have to eliminate or limit certain foods, either temporarily or in some cases permanently.

                          For example, back in the days when I was eating wheat, I had sort of a continuous low level immune response that was always annoying but never very acute. Now that my gut and my immune system have healed, I get a really acute reaction if I ingest even the slightest amount of wheat. And 24-36 hours later I'll break out in a rash from head to toe. But I am not celiac and can't be, I don't have the DNA for it. A lot of people I know have this sort of response after being on a really strict wheat and gluten free diet for a while. And sometimes, unfortunately, it extends to other foods besides wheat. But then probably often due to wheat damage in the first place.

                          This is a good reason to stay away from reactive grains like wheat in the first place, the risk of acquiring additional food intolerances. Many of us have had complete disappearance of leaky gut and IBS symptoms on a very strict gluten free and wheat free diet. Some have had to go dairy free to achieve the result. If you read the study link above, you can see how wheat can keep your gut from healing.
                          Last edited by Paleo Man; 07-13-2010, 10:53 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Artemis View Post
                            Honestly, I'd only heard the names of those illnesses before and never bothered to look them up, but now that I see the list of symptoms they are quite daunting - I definitely identify with many of the symptoms for both leaky gut and IBS, although I don't think that's enough for an actual diagnosis. Do eggs affect these things or vice versa?
                            I have an article here that may help you a bit: http://foodfloraandfelines.blogspot....ou-should.html

                            It may well be a case of leaky gut so avoiding lectins and dairy might be something to consider in the future. Eggs are a source of lectins and so may be part of the cause of a leaky gut, but it may be the leaky gut was already there and now egg proteins are passing the gut barrier intact and suddenly causing symptoms. The article I wrote should explain it in more detail, hope it helps and good luck!
                            My primal adventures:
                            http://foodfloraandfelines.blogspot.com/
                            Cooking, nutrition, gardening, foraging, preserving, photography

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                            • #15
                              Artemis,

                              Nausea is not usually an allergic reaction.

                              Other things to consider/try, once you do go back to tring eggs again: try eating just the egg white for a day or two, since the sulfur compounds in the yolk may causing you distress and then try eating just the yolk for a day or two since most egg allergies/sensitivities are from the protein which is primarily found in the white.

                              Experiment and listen to your body.
                              "I am a member of PETA...People Eat Tasty Animals"

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