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Edamame beans (Soya), yes or no?

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  • Edamame beans (Soya), yes or no?

    I love these, they are so fresh and nutty, but I seem to be reading conflicting info on this website. They are preferable, but I guess high in carbs ?

    Are they Primal or not?

  • #2
    No. Primal or not, they are baaaaaad for you. Phytoestrogens are NOT endogenous for the human body. Especially for men and boys, they are dan-ger-ous.


    Get raw garbanzos if you must have something like that. :-) They're not really primal either, but nummy.

    http://www.wholesoystory.com/
    http://www.wholesoystory.com/newslet...eFertility.pdf

    Confused About Soy?--Soy Dangers Summarized

    * High levels of phytic acid in soy reduce assimilation of calcium, magnesium, copper, iron and zinc. Phytic acid in soy is not neutralized by ordinary preparation methods such as soaking, sprouting and long, slow cooking. High phytate diets have caused growth problems in children.
    * Trypsin inhibitors in soy interfere with protein digestion and may cause pancreatic disorders. In test animals soy containing trypsin inhibitors caused stunted growth.
    * Soy phytoestrogens disrupt endocrine function and have the potential to cause infertility and to promote breast cancer in adult women.
    * Soy phytoestrogens are potent antithyroid agents that cause hypothyroidism and may cause thyroid cancer. In infants, consumption of soy formula has been linked to autoimmune thyroid disease.
    * Vitamin B12 analogs in soy are not absorbed and actually increase the body's requirement for B12.
    * Soy foods increase the body's requirement for vitamin D.
    * Fragile proteins are denatured during high temperature processing to make soy protein isolate and textured vegetable protein.
    * Processing of soy protein results in the formation of toxic lysinoalanine and highly carcinogenic nitrosamines.
    * Free glutamic acid or MSG, a potent neurotoxin, is formed during soy food processing and additional amounts are added to many soy foods.
    * Soy foods contain high levels of aluminum which is toxic to the nervous system and the kidneys.


    1. Studies Showing the Toxicity of Soy in the US Food & Drug Administration's Poisonous Plant Database (7.5M PDF)
    2. Studies Showing Adverse Effects of Dietary Soy, 1971-2003
    3. Studies Showing Adverse Effects of Isoflavones, 1953-2003

    http://www.westonaprice.org/soy-alert.html for a stack of links to articles for your edification. :-)
    Chief cook & bottle washer for one kid, a dog, 6 hens, 2 surprise! roosters, two horses, and a random 'herd' of quail.

    ~The ultimate ignorance is the rejection of something one knows nothing about and refuses to investigate~

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    • #3
      No.
      .`.><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>
      ><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>

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      • #4
        Not at all primal and not at all healthy. Avoid completely!
        Find me at aToadontheRoad.com. Cheers!

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        • #5
          Marks says he eats them regularily in one of his blogs, so how can they be the devil in the form of a green tasty bean?
          Surely the jury is out?

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          • #6
            I second Eklecktica!

            Man was never intended to eat soybeans!
            "I am a member of PETA...People Eat Tasty Animals"

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            • #7
              soy is even worse for infants.
              My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Lektar View Post
                Marks says he eats them regularily in one of his blogs, so how can they be the devil in the form of a green tasty bean?
                Surely the jury is out?
                Depends on how you define the jury I guess!

                As you indicated, Mr. Sisson does not appear to consider them (at least in a whole and/or fermented form) the unqualified devil that many others do; here's a link to his blog post "Scrutinizing Soy": http://www.marksdailyapple.com/soy-scrutiny/

                And this quote is from the blog post "10 Things to Know About Tofu" (http://www.marksdailyapple.com/10-things-to-know-about-tofu/ ):"Whole soybeans, or edamame (in-the-shell version), are a great plant protein source. I eat soybeans regularly and I think this is a great way to eat soy because beans are unprocessed, fresh, and whole."

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                • #9
                  Definitely read up on why you should avoid soy in all forms. Even tempeh, which is fermented IN THE PLASTIC THEY SELL IT IN... nasty. It's so ironic when you see soccer moms walking out of the health food store with cartons of soy milk.

                  It's in the same league as hydrogenated oils, HFCS, artificial coloring, McDonald's, etc.

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                  • #10
                    It's not high in carbs, just unhealthy. From what I remember it's the phytates that block mineral absorption and something in soy that mimicks estrogen that makes it so bad.
                    Mark eats fermented soy.. I forgot why that's better than unfermented but a quick search of the site will probably bring up a few articles on soy.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by halloweenbinge View Post
                      Mark eats fermented soy.. I forgot why that's better than unfermented but a quick search of the site will probably bring up a few articles on soy.
                      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/soy-scrutiny/
                      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/10-things-to-know-about-tofu/

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by arewolfe View Post
                        Even tempeh, which is fermented IN THE PLASTIC THEY SELL IT IN... nasty.
                        Would you mind linking to wherever you read this? I'd like to hear more on the subject.

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                        • #13
                          I think some of the blog posts are pretty old. Based on more recent posts, I think Mark may have a more negative stance on soy, especially unfermented.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
                            I think some of the blog posts are pretty old. Based on more recent posts, I think Mark may have a more negative stance on soy, especially unfermented.
                            I was trying to find something more recent that was on point but was coming up empty; do you have any specific blog links you could share?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tarek View Post
                              Would you mind linking to wherever you read this? I'd like to hear more on the subject.

                              I learned about this from the instructor at a 3 month course I took about a year ago. She was vegan but extremely knowledgeable about commercial food production techniques. She was a student of Ann Wigmore (one of the founders of raw veganism) in the late 1980's and had spent 20+ years in the field of raw food and nutrition.

                              Interestingly enough, she and her husband both admit they eat store-bought tempeh regularly. They're raising their kids vegan too, so sad.

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