Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Is A Calorie A Calorie?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    You lose muscle when your calories are too low. Perhaps to spare the fat or due to higher levels of cortisol from stressing the body out?
    My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

    Comment


    • #32
      ^ when you lower your caloric intake too much, your body has to cut back its expenditure. There are many ways to do that, and I think that *what* you eat is an important factor here, as is the kinds of workouts you do, how much sleep you get, and how stressful your life is. Some of these factors promote fat loss, some promote fat storage ... some promote muscle gain, some promote muscle loss.

      Considering that type 2 diabetes is very similar to the state that hibernating animals reach just before hibernation and this happens at a time of the year when traditionally carbs are available, combined with all the other things we know about our metabolism, I think it's safe to say that carbs promote fat gain (by exacerbating hyperinsulinemia) - I would add though that this is probably only the case if you exceed a certain amount of carbs that may be different for each person. Griff for example may have a very, very low threshold, and the threshold may also change in a person's lifetime. You may also be fine if you occasionally eat too many carbs, if your weekly average intake is still low enough. When it comes to muscle, I'd say that it's generally difficult to preserve or even build muscle when you're not eating enough.

      I would recommend that you cycle your caloric intake as well as your carb ratio. Eat a little too much, and a moderate amount of carbs on training days, eat much less, and few carbs, on resting days. That way on average your caloric intake will be low, as will be your carb intake, but you still give your muscles a chance to grow. Of course - that should go without saying - eat adequate amounts of protein every day.
      Last edited by MikeEnRegalia; 06-12-2010, 10:20 AM.
      MikeEnRegalia's Blog - Nutrition, Dieting, Exercise and other stuff ;-)

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Dosenberry View Post

        Hurley consumes exactly 1800 calories every single day and burns exactly 2000 calories every single day. Hurley is losing weight every single day. The type of food does not at all matter.
        Sure it's true; it's just description of the facts. Assuming he has an accurate measurement of calories in and out. But he doesn't.

        And it's not true that if by some magic he really knows that he currently burns 2000 calories, that if he then eats 1800 calories, type doesn't matter, that his output will remain 2000 calories.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by RSL View Post
          By the way, I also believe that a calorie is not a calorie when introduced into the human body. And every human body is different and will react in different ways to the same amount of food. A person with a high metabolism will be able to consume more "calories" without gaining weight, than a person with a low metabolism.

          A person with a high metabolism burns more calories quicker...

          Obviously.
          Originally posted by MalPaz View Post
          hormones and leptin included, a calorie is not a calorie....everything you eat enters your body but it isnt processed the same way...everything has its breakdown, pathway, macro/micro....everything will ellicite an insulin response, the 'extra' determined by YOUR body whcih will take in to acct exercise, cortisol, leptin, hormones, adrenals....what they say is extra is stored... unless you know all the current attitudes(dunno another word to put here) of every function in your body you can never say X amt of calories makes me gain and X makes me lose..... i ate like 4500 calories last night and dropped a lb this morning... and i NEED to gain weight
          You are correct.

          My conclusion so far is this...

          A calorie is simply a measure of unit as my dad stated. You lose weight by burning more calories then you take in. But, like I was telling him, it is basically impossible to know how many calories you burn and even eat. We all burn calories at different rates. There are an unlimited amount of factors that go into calorie burning. This is why many of you have said that a calorie is not a calorie.

          I know full well that in order to lose weight and either maintain or gain muscle one needs to limit carbs and increase fat and protein intake. If someone wants to drop the weight overall then he or she needs to burn more calories then he or she puts in. The easiest and most effective way to do this is to limit carbs. This is because of how the body deals with this macronutrient that is not even necessarily needed to survive.
          Find me at aToadontheRoad.com. Cheers!

          Comment


          • #35
            A calorie is a unit of energy. However, a calorie releases energy differently in the body then it would if you were to use it to heat water. Your body is not a furnace, and different calories release energy differently. For instance, I could ingest 4,000 calories of fat and protein with no carbs, and not gain weight, but if I were to eat 4,000 calories on a high carb diet, I would certainly grow fat, and at a remarkable pace.

            So, as you can see, a calorie is technically a calorie, but probably not in the way most people think. It's all a matter of metabolism. I could in theory gain weight on a ketogenic diet, but the thing is, my metabolism would be burning so fast that I would have to consume ridiculous amounts of food to start packing on the pounds, while on a high carb diet I would start gaining on much less food since my metabolism wouldn't be going as fast.
            Remember, you are unique just like everybody else.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by Beefsister View Post
              A calorie is a unit of energy. However, a calorie releases energy differently in the body then it would if you were to use it to heat water. Your body is not a furnace, and different calories release energy differently. For instance, I could ingest 4,000 calories of fat and protein with no carbs, and not gain weight, but if I were to eat 4,000 calories on a high carb diet, I would certainly grow fat, and at a remarkable pace.

              So, as you can see, a calorie is technically a calorie, but probably not in the way most people think. It's all a matter of metabolism. I could in theory gain weight on a ketogenic diet, but the thing is, my metabolism would be burning so fast that I would have to consume ridiculous amounts of food to start packing on the pounds, while on a high carb diet I would start gaining on much less food since my metabolism wouldn't be going as fast.
              This makes A LOT of sense... are you 100% sure of what you are saying? Anyone else have thoughts? I really like what you just said...
              Find me at aToadontheRoad.com. Cheers!

              Comment


              • #37
                I second the suggestion to read Good Calories, Bad Calories.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Dosenberry View Post
                  This makes A LOT of sense... are you 100% sure of what you are saying? Anyone else have thoughts? I really like what you just said...
                  There are other factors, but I believe that this sums it up fairly well. If you want to go into the complexity that is hormones, I would suggest asking someone a wee bit more experienced. However, what I said isn't anything new. Your body must follow the rules of thermodynamics. If you eat too much, the energy cannot disappear. Therefore, even if you were in ketosis, if you consumed to much energy, you would grow fat. However, on low carb, your body becomes more efficient at burning energy, so it would be very difficult to eat so much your body could not find a way to burn it off. I have heard some people say that when they eat low carb, they feel hotter. I am not sure if this is correct, but apparently in some cases the body will become hotter to burn off extra calories. The guy who said this said he was happy he was low carbing because it might make winter more bearable

                  But I'm no professional. I'm basing this off of common sense (and scientific laws), and a lot of flipping through diet books.
                  Remember, you are unique just like everybody else.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Maybe you can piss out some of the energy. Isn't this how ketosis shows up on ketostix?
                    .`.><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>
                    ><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      How do you know that the body absorbs all of the food? It could be sweated out, urinated out or become feces too. If your gut is damaged the process isn't as effecient. The food itself might be compromised and not have as many macronutrients.
                      My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Bisous View Post
                        Lost a parasite, more like.
                        Whaaaaatttt??!
                        On a mission to help others master movement, build unbreakable strength, & eat MORE food (can't beat that.) Weekly fitness, health & nutrition articles at indulgentfitness.com.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Yesterday I had a bit more food than usual. (1000+ calories but still in ketosis). I was up almost all night, all energetic and doing pushups, handstands, and sweating a lot. I think my body increased my metabolism to burn all the excess energy I ate instead of storing it. Sounds good!!!
                          .`.><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>
                          ><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by strom View Post
                            How do you know that the body absorbs all of the food? It could be sweated out, urinated out or become feces too. If your gut is damaged the process isn't as effecient. The food itself might be compromised and not have as many macronutrients.
                            You can't sweat or urinate out food *unless* it was absorbed in the first place. Simple mechanics. Feces is a different story

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              I have a question to throw into the mix, slightly off topic, but not really...

                              We know that if a person eats too many carbs, even "good" carbs, blood sugar will spike, excess insulin will be produced, and body fat will be stored. So we control our carb intake to control fat storage.

                              Also, we know that if a person eats too much protein, it can also cause an over release of insulin, with the result of body fat storage. So we also control our protein intake to control fat storage.

                              But what about dietary fat consumption? What if a person is going along quite nicely, eating a proper amount of carbs, protein and fat, and maintaining a healthy weight and body composition, and then suddenly begins eating 100 extra grams of fat per day? If a calorie is a calorie is a calorie, and 3,500 calories equals a pound, then by eating that 900 extra calories per day, that person would gain around 1/4 pound of body fat per day.

                              But, if this is true (which I doubt), by what mechanism is body fat being stored in the fat cells?

                              And, if it is not true (which I suspect), is there a limit to how much dietary fat a person can eat without starting to gain weight?

                              Mark says that calories don't matter TO A POINT, but that if you eat too many of them, you will start to gain weight.

                              So what's the deal on fat "calories", in everyone's opinion or actual knowledge?
                              Rebecca

                              Right click here to watch me lose 22.5 pounds of body fat and gain 5.5 pounds of muscle in only 5 months right before your eyes in this cool morphing video!

                              Click the banner below to visit my blog:

                              sigpic

                              Feb 2009 - 158 pounds - 43.6% body fat
                              Aug 2013 - 138 pounds - 34.3% body fat
                              So far, lost 19.8 pounds of body fat and gained 1.8 pounds of lean mass
                              Goal - 136 pounds - 30% body fat
                              Still need to lose 6.4 more pounds of body fat and gain 4.2 more pounds of lean mass

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                RSL- I would love to know that as well. I know when I eat extra coconut oil and heavy cream I seem to drop weight faster? It's like I'm giving my body permission to release it's fat stores. Like, I'm showing it "hey, I've got enough here, no need to hold onto more" hehe, not very scientific, eh? I don't really know what kind of reaction fat sets into motion in the body, especially in excess. Anyone?

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X