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  • Everyman Retired

    I am retired. I have been retired for over two years. I worked as an accountant for over thirty years. On occasion, I would think: if only I had the time and money, I would do great things.

    I now have lots of time and sufficient funds for my modest needs and what have I done for the past two years?

    Absolutely nothing.

    The purpose of this journal is to motivate myself. It seems to me that by writing down my goals, plans and efforts to be the best I could possibly be, I would be more likely to follow them.

    I invite you to join me on this journey, to be my guide, mentor and critic and weíll see where it takes us.

  • #2
    Welcome ER! Hope you are feeling enthused about starting your primal journey. What brought you to primal? There is some great, and some brain achingly conflicting advice on here so always do your own research too!
    I'm not saying lets kill all the stupid people in the world, I'm just saying let's remove all the warning labels and let the problem take care of itself.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Kiki,

      I am indeed looking forward to this journey.

      What brought me to Primal? Well, in short: I smoke a lot: 30 cigarettes a day. I drink a lot: binge three times a week. My diet is horrific, my sleep even worse and I never exercise. I am in terrible physical condition. I came upon ďThe Perfect Health DietĒ in the library and it made a lot of sense. So, I might just give it a whirl.

      Comment


      • #4
        Every man addresses the Demon Drink

        I woke up this morning with a hangover. This seems an opportune time to address one of my addictions.

        The Facts:

        I was bored last evening so I cycled over to my club and had six large drinks with some acquaintances I met there. I enjoyed a few sociable hours. I staggered home with my bicycle and fell asleep for five hours, unable to fall asleep again. Methinks I see a pattern emerging since Iíve been retired. I typically drink as above three evenings a week.

        The Downside of his Drinking:

        1) Technically, the imbibing of six drinks in a row three times a week makes him an alcoholic by any recognized criteria.

        2) Alcohol disturbs his sleep, both in quality and duration.

        3) He feels quite bad and unsettled the next day, making three days out of the seven in week unpleasant.

        4) This kind of drinking is bad for his long term health leading to heart, liver and numerous other problems.

        5) He has a bit of a paunch to which alcohol is a major contributor.

        6) He does/says stupid things when inebriated leading to regret and loss of reputation.

        7) He has fallen off his bicycle several times when coming home from the club.

        8) The financial cost rings in at 6 drinks * $7.00 a drink * 3 times a week * 52 weeks. About $7,500 a year: a not insignificant sum.

        The Upside of his Drinking:

        1) Alcohol alleviates his boredom. Being retired, he has lots of time on his hands.

        2) He is more social and less inhibited when he drinks.

        3) He thinks he is more creative when he drinks.

        So there you have it. On balance, I would say the negatives outweigh the positives. In regard to the upside, I need to develop hobbies so that I am not bored. I need to be more social when Iím not drinking: say hi to strangers, smile more and the like. I also need to write this journal regularly to develop my creative side without the impetus of alcohol.

        The Decision

        Everyman hereby pledges to abstain from all alcoholic beverages for 30 days, at the conclusion of which time, this question will be reexamined. This will rid the body of toxins and allow the implementation of the strategies outlined above; to wit: develop hobbies, be more social and write a lot.

        Last edited by Mr. Everyman; 09-30-2013, 04:24 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Every Man wants to be Happy

          Iím attracted to the primal diet because I like getting down to basics and you canít get any more foundational than basing your diet on what we evolved to eat. Iíve now had the opportunity to tour the site and it seems to be a curious mix of wisdom, contrarianism and one of the best sources of health advice anywhere.

          As I said, I like getting down to basics and it seems to me that this pursuit of the perfect diet is essentially a pursuit of good health which is essentially a pursuit of happiness. The goal for the most part is not to look good, but much more importantly, to feel good. Our existence here is based upon our physical body which determines not only our total life span but also whether we are free from pain and discomfort on a daily basis. Good health is therefore, for most of us a necessary prerequisite for happiness and I think I can safely assert that every man is interested in being happy. But hereís the rub: what is happiness? I like some of this guyís ideas:

          The Happiness Hypothesis - Jonathan Haidt

          but Iíll have to think on it for a while. Happiness, I think should encompass the entire being: Body, Mind and Soul. There is a great deal on this forum on the health of the body, some on mental health and a little on spiritual health.

          Iíll return to this question of happiness at a later date. As a working hypothesis for now, we can define happiness as feeling good most of the time. Since being healthy is part of feeling good, it makes good practical sense to eat the optimal diet, viz. primal diet.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mr. Everyman View Post
            I am retired. I have been retired for over two years. I worked as an accountant for over thirty years. On occasion, I would think: if only I had the time and money, I would do great things.

            I now have lots of time and sufficient funds for my modest needs and what have I done for the past two years?

            Absolutely nothing.

            The purpose of this journal is to motivate myself. It seems to me that by writing down my goals, plans and efforts to be the best I could possibly be, I would be more likely to follow them.

            I invite you to join me on this journey, to be my guide, mentor and critic and we’ll see where it takes us.
            Retired and lots of funds??? Are you single?? Marry me ... marry me .. marry me...

            Just kiding lol we were discussing retirement on another thread, and just saw this

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Mr. Everyman View Post
              I am retired. I have been retired for over two years. I worked as an accountant for over thirty years. On occasion, I would think: if only I had the time and money, I would do great things.

              I now have lots of time and sufficient funds for my modest needs and what have I done for the past two years?

              Absolutely nothing.

              The purpose of this journal is to motivate myself. It seems to me that by writing down my goals, plans and efforts to be the best I could possibly be, I would be more likely to follow them.

              I invite you to join me on this journey, to be my guide, mentor and critic and we’ll see where it takes us.
              Retired and lots of funds??? so lucky

              Just kidding lol we were discussing retirement on another thread, and just saw this

              Comment


              • #8
                Well I think that you will get loads of support here. Writing your goals increases your chance of achieving them. Having said that I have posted the last 2 nights that i was going to work out and failed miserably, but at least the intention was there, life just got in the way. At least this forum gives you the opportunity to dust yourself down and pick yourself up without feeling bad which is more than I have felt when I have tried to change my lifestyle in the past.
                I'm not saying lets kill all the stupid people in the world, I'm just saying let's remove all the warning labels and let the problem take care of itself.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hotmail, I am sorely tempted by your kind offer to enter into matrimony. However I am honor bound to decline since I greatly fear you may have misread my post (angelic expression and halo above). I do have ďlots of time and sufficient funds for my modest needsĒ, but I should point out that my needs are exceedingly modest.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You are absolutely right, Kiki. I never really thought of myself as an alcoholic till I saw the Downside in black and white. Seems to strengthen my resolve to keep the Pledge.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Every Man and Morpheus

                      Just finished ďThe Perfect Health DietĒ. Paul Jaminet and his wife really did their homework on this one. Seldom have I read a book that had so much information packed into a few lines. I would have to read it again to appreciate the finer points, but I think Iíve absorbed enough to start implementing it. I like the idea of Circadian Rhythms and the way I can tie my daily schedule to natural cycles.

                      Now I lay me down to sleep

                      The Research:

                      Go to sleep when the sun goes down and wake up at sunrise. Doable in Summer when the night is eight hours long. Not so much in these northern climes when those long, icy Winter nights stretch to thirteen hours. Paul advises no TV, computer screens or bright lights in the evening; and to take magnesium and if necessary melatonin before bed. Blackout curtains are good. Nine hours seems to be the optimal amount of sleep.

                      The Plan:

                      The sun rises at 7:30 am tomorrow so Iíll take a walk down to the lake to watch it rise. Itís been many a long year since Iíve done that, but it seems a great way to anchor my day. Bedtime tonight would therefore be 10:00 pm. I seldom watch TV and I like to read by lamplight at night. Just bought my first supplements today: Magnesium Citrate and vitamins D3, C and K2. The Magnesium comes in 150 mg tablets and the directions on the bottle say to take 1 to 3 tablets a day. Iíve searched this forum for the optimal dosage and the range of variation is truly astounding. I think Iíll take 300mg and see how it goes. Iíll save the heavy hitter, melatonin for another day. Now where can I buy blackout curtains?

                      To be continued

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Every Man's plan goes Awry

                        I should have known that Morpheus (God of sleep and dreams) comes at no manís command. Went to bed at 10:00 pm. Willed myself to go to sleep for two hours. No go. Said: to heck with it Ė and promptly fell asleep.

                        Got down to the lake at 8:30 am by which time the sun was well into the heavens. Took a walk along the Boardwalk, wended through a woodland path and returned along the waterís edge. One of my first resolutions was to say Hi to strangers. I have not done that yet, but three strangers happened along and said Hi to me.

                        So here I sit, after an hourís walk contemplating the lake, the vast blue sky and dare I say it, enjoying a cigarette. Was there ever a time when my sleep was in tune?

                        Well, last year I walked a thousand kilometers across France and Northern Spain Ė the Camino de Santiago. I typically slept in co ed dormitories housing up to fifty pilgrims. I slept a sweet and dreamless sleep for sixty nights, even though total strangers slept in bunk beds four feet above and on either side.

                        I achieved this happy state because I had accidentally stumbled upon the perfect circadian Rhythm:

                        1) Lights out at 10:00 pm. Woken up at 6:00am

                        2) Seven hours walking with a heavy back pack: up mountains, down mountains, through the blazing sunshine and through the pouring rain in absolutely spectacular countryside/wilderness.

                        3) Unbelievably good coffee for breakfast, tortilla for lunch and the pilgrimís menu for supper, which incidentally included an entire bottle of the local red wine. (I was walking through one of the great wine growing areas of the world so the local wine was the finest wine anywhere). Meals all taken outside in the sun.

                        4) Lots of good cheer because I was walking with thousands of like minded people from all parts of the world and good fellowship was the order of the day.

                        It was the best of times and the very best of times. Will be doing it again this Spring.

                        So it seems I have to get all my ducks in a row in my ordinary life before Morpheus will deign to visit me on a consistent basis Ė which brings us to sunlight exposure and exercise timing.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Mr. Everyman, you're on the right track! I'll be retiring in 3 years or less, so I will learn from your mistakes That is so awesome that you did the Camino de Santiago! I loved the movie, The Way. A 70-year old lady I work with now is doing it next summer, with her daughter. It sounds as if you had an incredible experience! What was the reason you originally went for? I hope you will share more details about that.

                          Keep writing, I'm enjoying your journal!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have also been to Santiago de Compostela. It will always have a special place in my heart. Mass on Sunday in the cathedral was one of the most amazing spiritual occasions of my life. I think I cried. Amazing memories.
                            I'm not saying lets kill all the stupid people in the world, I'm just saying let's remove all the warning labels and let the problem take care of itself.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Kiki and Cave Bird,

                              Thanks for dropping by. The doorís always open. Wish I could offer you a glass of wine, but Iím on the wagon for a month.

                              I liked the Camino because it hit all the buttons: Mind, Body and perhaps most importantly, the Soul.

                              Stressed by the frantic pace of modern living, many find peace. At times, thereís only you, the mountain and the deep blue sky. With no distractions, you have a rare opportunity to meet Ė yourself - and everybody likes who they meet.

                              Likewise many lapsed Catholics rediscover their faith and dyed in the wool atheists rethink their position.

                              You also become extraordinarily fit in a short time: good food, good sleep, good wine, good company and lots of exercise Ė you couldnít duplicate it in any health club. The Way has always had a reputation as a healing ground and the ruins of hospitals from the Middle Ages dot the path. Certain it is that many physical ailments seem to disappear by the time you hug St James in the great Cathedral in Santiago.

                              Kiki, yet another example of the serendipity of the Camino: that you too should also have attended mass in Santiago.

                              Cave Bird, you have to do the Camino when you retire. Youíll love it. Your co worker is young for the Camino Ė I met a guy in his eighties who had walked from Belgium.

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