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One Doctor's Journey Back Home....a day in the life of a very happy guy.

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  • #16
    great journal but it made me want to pick your brains - since my blood sugar controls got really tight my visions got worse although not dramatically but it is noticable when i read fine print- why does this happen?
    When I'd had enough of the grain and starched based 'diabetic eating for health' diet (eating for health, my ass!) my weight was 242.5 lbs. On starting primal- 18th April 2013 weight : 238.1.
    27th July 2013. weight after 100 days 136.9 weight lost 101.2lb ; that's 105.6lbs since I stopped the 'diabetic eating for health'
    new journal http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...ml#post1264082

    Comment


    • #17
      First a little disclaimer....I do not plan on just on keeping a “journal” so much as writing a column of sorts. I will write about primal as it relates to food/health issues, as well as to nutrition’s role in healthcare in the US. What this means is that you WILL be reading opinion, of which I will happily take your critiques of.

      Once I have a little more time I plan on starting my own blog. For now I will be posting here as well as a few other sites. Enjoy and attack away if you wish.

      Nutrition, Doctors, and the Scapegoat Effect


      In my time on forums and in-person discussions over the years, I have repeatedly heard one derivation or another of the following refrain:

      “Doctors don’t even talk about nutrition and know nothing about it. That is why we listen to other people to get our dieting advice. To add to this, they are full of standard-issue conventional wisdom on nutrition, and are stuck in their ways about counseling it.”

      The above sentiment is both painfully true and amazingly naïve, at the same time….but it reveals one of our biggest tendencies as a culture: picking one or two groups to scapegoat our larger societal problems on, all in order to create useful public villains and divert responsibility away from the actual power brokers in any given area.

      In discussions of crime, it is useful for each side to pin the blame on either the police or a given minority community, depending on your slant. In discussions of economics, it is useful to blame either ruthless corporations or “socialist” business regulation. In politics, the extreme right or left is blamed for every malady the country endures or ever has endured….We do this with nearly everything….and the goal is always the same.

      The goal is to convince each side of the dangers of the other side controlling policy, to generate fear, to depict a boogey man that is out to get them or otherwise not looking out for them in the least.

      The same is true with doctors and nutrition. The truth is always somewhere in the middle, with both sides being correct about certain aspects. In the case of nutritional guidance in regards to doctors, here is the reality:

      What we are up against

      - As in many areas of our society, given groups are pinned with the blame on what are actually HUGE, multi-factorial, societal ills. In any discussion of nutrition, it is a dishonest endeavor if money and lobbying power are not brought into the discussion….in other words, discussing food without discussing money and politics is not a real discussion. As a practicing physician that must give out nutritional advice almost daily, here are the main three monsters I am up against.

      1) Multi-national corporations with huge advertising campaigns, the ability to lobby (read: bribe) Congress for laws beneficial for them financially, and immunity from lawsuit in controlling all ends of production. This includes GMO use, their ability to make heavily processed foods very cheaply due to subsidies, and their ubiquity/monopoly of almost all places where food is bought.
      2) A for-profit insurance system and government-run system that rewards only treatments to disease, not prevention of disease….as a doctor, I get paid for pills, surgeries, or exams that I give you. I do not get paid for you sitting at home eating an apple and never needing a doctor.
      3) Decades of research, mostly done in the 70’s and bought into for political reasons, that give very bad advice in regards to nutrition.

      So, other than that my job is really easy.

      My question when I get into these discussions is always the same: which one of those drivers up there is the fault of the medical community, and which are the fault of society?

      We could live in a country with this in place for each of the problems above….

      1) We COULD create patient pools, done at random, in which a given set of doctors and facilities are charged with the care of. There would be a flat rate paid to each doctor in the performance of preventing these people from poor outcomes….no more getting paid per surgery or per patient seen; incentivize health care, not disease care.
      2) We COULD repeal the massive subsidies given to companies like ConAgra or Monsanto that give monopoly power to them, as well as allow them to make the worst food in the store also be the cheapest. A bag of cheetos is cheaper than a head of lettuce because of the lobbying power behind that bag. That is the ONLY reason, and it is that way because we allow it to be.
      3) We COULD subsidize organic producers and small-time fruit/vegetable producers in the same fashion we do corn and wheat. (Many corn-growers sell at less than cost of production. Tax dollars alone give them profit, not the market. THAT is socialism.)

      My point, as in almost any big discussion, is that this kind of this does not happen in a vacuum. Everything is connected.

      So in closing, here is my reply to the sentiment I wrote in italics earlier.

      “Doctors are at the end of the spear in combating an epidemic of terrible health in America. For this reason, we are often blamed for a part of it….The reality is that an entire apparatus of government and corporate power serves to maintain our food system the way that it is, and is by far the biggest contributor to our health crisis. To stand against this tidal wave we are armed only with some rudimentary pills to control symptoms, a lot of paid for government-backed information, and a legal system that will spit us out the other end the second we practice in a different way. Those that do, like me, do so at their own peril, daily. Society need not look to us to blame. They need only look in the mirror. They made themselves sick and bought-off, and now they are upset that our profession cannot sufficiently save them from their own undoing.”

      Laz. Signing out
      Last edited by TheyCallMeLazarus; 08-05-2013, 08:40 AM.
      "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

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      • #18
        So going to lurk and post on this brilliant journal
        Some people just need a sympathetic pat... On the head... With a hammer.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by AuroraB View Post
          So going to lurk and post on this brilliant journal
          Me too!

          Comment


          • #20
            Doctors are at the end of the spear in combating an epidemic of terrible health in America. For this reason, we are often blamed for a part of it….The reality is that an entire apparatus of government and corporate power serves to maintain our food system the way that it is, and is by far the biggest contributor to our health crisis. To stand against this tidal wave we are armed only with some rudimentary pills to control symptoms, a lot of paid for government-backed information, and a legal system that will spit us out the other end the second we practice in a different way. Those that do, like me, do so at their own peril, daily. Society need not look to us to blame. They need only look in the mirror. They made themselves sick and bought-off, and now they are upset that our profession cannot sufficiently save them from their own undoing.
            "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

            B*tch-lite

            Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

            Comment


            • #21
              Hi Laz - Here are some randoms thoughts -

              You want to take charge of the health of a randomly selected set of individuals when they'll never listen to your advice anyway? If doctors aren't paid per surgery, won't that encourage them to perform less surgeries? We see that now, with doctors not prescribing tests or procedures because the insurance company will kick them out if they prescribe too many.

              Here in Spain there is a public health system and MDs are not highly paid. They get paid the same whether they prescribe a pill or a one hour walk. The style of treatment is basically the same as in the US. People show up in their office sick, and they prescribe pills etc to treat whatever problem the person came to the doctor for.

              Doctors treat symptoms because thats why people go to doctors. People don't go to doctors and ask, 'Doc, what do I need to do to live a long healthy life?' In the US the gov't does make food and exercise recommendations to its citizens but few people listen. I'll bet the the health of the country as a whole would be much better if everyone actually followed the food pyramid and other recommendations that are being made for them. But no one pays attention to that stuff. Everyone wants their super sized slurpee.

              Removing farm subsidies will raise food prices at the supermarket. Most people make food choices based on price and they shop at the stores with the cheapest prices. There is strong pressure to keep food prices as low as possible.

              that is all for now. Grok on.
              Mike

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by TheyCallMeLazarus View Post
                [
                In my time on forums and in-person discussions over the years, I have repeatedly heard one derivation or another of the following refrain:

                “Doctors don’t even talk about nutrition and know nothing about it. That is why we listen to other people to get our dieting advice. To add to this, they are full of standard-issue conventional wisdom on nutrition, and are stuck in their ways about counseling it.”

                The above sentiment is both painfully true and amazingly naïve, at the same time….but it reveals one of our biggest tendencies as a culture: picking one or two groups to scapegoat our larger societal problems on, all in order to create useful public villains and divert responsibility away from the actual power brokers in any given area.
                Laz, thanks for posting and for your discussion. I would just like to chime in and say that though I have heard statements like this a lot also, and even experienced such from my doctor, thankfully it is not always the case.

                Just last week my friend received solid advice from her family GP to eat protein, greens and fat at every meal. (I have told her something similar before and I'm sure others have also). Anyway, she tried it and it's working for her. Yay for her and yay for her doctor and any others like yourself who know how to give good instruction in nutrition to people when they are ready to hear it.
                Annie Ups the Ante
                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

                Comment


                • #23
                  It's great to read a perspective from a member of the medical community. I can't wait to read more!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    THE ANIMAL MOTHER OF ALL ROUTINES
                    Start date Sept 10, 2013. Test Dates: January 1, 2014 through January 8.

                    So, I have decided that I am going to shake things up again. I never stay with an exact routine for more than about 6 months, so this I my new one. The big stuff never changes (Big 4 lifts, for example), but the methodology does. I am writing this partially for myself, so put it all down, but also for others to track my results.

                    Every objective needs a few common things: 1) A mission 2) Clearly defined goals, with benchmarks of success to meet exactly 3) Methodology 4) An exit strategy

                    1) The Mission
                    In short, to be in the best shape of my life and overall be a beast. I define a "beast" with meeting a few criteria:
                    A) Being lean, no more than 10%BF. Doesn't matter what your 1RM is if you look like a ball of cookie dough.
                    B) Being healthy. All blood panel numbers must improve.
                    C) Strength. Increases on all major lifts.
                    D) Speed, vertical jump. Explosive power, running speed are critical.
                    E) Endurance. Nothing else matters if you don't have this in any sport or practical setting.

                    2) The Goals
                    A) Leanness: Goal is to be no more than 8%BF, down from a current 10.5% per water immersion test. Less, for example shooting for 6.5%, will sacrifice the other goals unduly, especially the strength gains. Cutting 2% in 4 months is a different matter than cutting 4%.

                    B) Health: Goal Hba1c is below 4.9%, down from current 5.3% from my normal summer fruit binges. HDL goal is 100, up from 95
                    This will be the easiest one.

                    C) Strength: Goals on benchmarks lifts as follows, 1RM
                    Bench: 300lbs, up from current 290. This has been a goal of mine for 5 years, to one day bench 300#.
                    Squat: 430lbs, up from current 405. This will be very difficult, as this has stagnated for over a year.
                    Mil Press: 135lbs, up from current 120.
                    Weighted Pull-up: (Not a chin) 80lbs, up from current 70.
                    C&J: 225, up from current 205. My shoulders are a mess though from years of football, so this one may fall to injury.

                    D) Speed, explosive power.
                    Vertical jump: Goal is 33 inches, up from 30....as a reference, Darrell Revis, likely the cornerback in the NFL, did a 38 inch.
                    40 meters: Want to run my 21yo college football best again, at 4.47. I may fail, but I will try like hell. Last measured was over a year ago, a 4.55 This will be tested last, as I need to go to the university to do it with their blocks and laser timer.

                    E) Endurance
                    1 mile run: Goal is to run in under 5:20, only ten seconds faster than current. 30 mile ruck walk along long trail must still be completed in one day, to be done the weekend of Jan 4.

                    3) Methodology
                    Diet: I will be weight and speed training 4 days a week, doing endurance work, long and slow the other 2 days. Sundays will consist of football watching and zero exercise past normal home upkeep. I have organized my weight days into 4 WOD's, to be done on a rotation. On weight training days, I will eat a lot, as clean as possible. I tend to eat a lot of rice and beans though to keep cals up on these days, with protein being around 200g. No sugar, no PUFA, ever.....fasting on workout days will be from 9pm until noon the following day (15 hours), and from 9pm until 5pm (20 hours) on endurance LISS days.

                    Most meals will consist of game meats, as the venison and rabbit that will be the bulk of the autumn diet is still out in a field somewhere as I write this I will supplement white rice, pinto beans to refill glycogen for the workout days. Endurance days will be lower carb, likely around 50g, but I never count anything.

                    Workouts: Unless otherwise noted, all weights will be done reverse pyramid style, 3 sets. First set will be 1-3 reps, then 6-8 for 2 after
                    WOD #1
                    Strength: Bench, Tricep ring dips w kettleball hanging, decline pushup with weight on back
                    Speed: 330lb Prowler sled, 25 yards, 5 trips
                    Conditioning: 320lb Farmer's Walk of 25 yards, 10 burpees x 7 cycles

                    WOD #2
                    Strength: Weighted Pull-up, Squat (high bar)
                    Speed: 100y sprint, EMOM for 9 minutes
                    Conditioning: Weighted glute-ham raises, 2 pood (72lbs) KB swings. 10 x 7 cycles

                    WOD #3
                    Strength: Pendlay Row, Military Press, Deadlift (DL will sub for Pendlays every 2 weeks. They are a fine wine, to be enjoyed)
                    Speed: 40y sprints x 7, 20y x5 (burst work), 100y x 2 to finish
                    Conditioning: Tabata row, 20 sec hard, rest 10s, 8 total rounds

                    WOD #4
                    Agility day
                    Ring muscle ups, cage crossers (laterally crossing the pull-up cage), weight vest box jumps, HSPU, swimming intervals to end

                    Off-days: Usually a lot of hiking, and I will likely throw in a 36hr fast with a Mt Mansfield climb on the end of it. Haven't found anything better to get rid of fat yet I will be not lifting on my off-days from work (I work 4 12 hour shifts a week), so ALL of my housework will be on those days. I live off-grid with a woodstove for heat, so that will be a lot of wood chopping!

                    Exit Strategy
                    After testing during the week in January I will post everything here, as well as hopefully consistent updates throughout. I will be putting up some photos of before and after soon.

                    Once this is done, 2 weeks off....just some easy body-weight stuff, lots of hiking, skiing by then. I will buy myself a big cheesecake too

                    Love it. Or change it. Off to the gym for WOD#2!
                    "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Good luck, Laz. You will have the hiking and skiing of your life after that lot.
                      Annie Ups the Ante
                      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        A roughly one-month update:

                        A) Leanness: Last measure was done last week, down to 9.2%. All I want is another point, so I can pump the brakes a little from my masochistic calorie killing lately. I can see the veins on my stomach now though, which is a cool indicator for me.

                        B) Health: No blood testing yet.

                        C) Strength: Goals on benchmarks lifts as follows, 1RM
                        Bench: FINALLY benched 300 last Monday, with the SO recording it and everything. Took me 5 years, but I added 100lbs to that lift.
                        Squat: 410lbs, up from previous 405. Pretty weak sauce here....I have come to the conclusion that I can build strength on a slow cut everywhere else, but only a true bulk gives me squat increases I am hoping to surge on this next month though, when I will be hitting the food a little harder after lifting.
                        Mil Press: 135lbs, up from current 120.
                        Weighted Pull-up: 75lbs yesterday, up from 70lbs, did it for 2 strict reps.
                        C&J: Already accomplished this @ 225#, doing 255!!!! last week. I for sure didn't power clean it, but a squat clean should still count.

                        D) Speed, explosive power.
                        Vertical jump: Not tested yet. Been doing a lot of vest jumps though, so I am expecting progress next week when I do.
                        40 meter: Still no improvement, but haven't done it really rested and limber yet. More work must be put in first....

                        E) Endurance
                        1 mile run: 5:13, done last Friday after a 12 hour shift.

                        All in all, I have been amazed at the progress in everything but my squats....I did a lifting comp last weekend for charity and did a 255lb C&J. I have decided I want to CJ 300 within 6 months.

                        The downside of course has been how time consuming it is. I spend about 60-90 min a day, 4X a week lifting....add in the hunting season, chopping, etc, and by Sunday I am a mess. I am taking today off, giving 2 whole days of nothing, all due to the 30 miles or so of walking I did over the weekend hunting. Still sore. More updates to come.
                        "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          One Doctor's Journey Back Home....a day in the life of a very happy guy.

                          When can I expect these before and after pics you mention?

                          Your workouts sound amazing to watch... Decline weighted push-ups! Wowz.
                          Last edited by moluv; 10-21-2013, 03:17 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            You are living the life! If I could figure out a way to live just hunting or fishing all day...my dream!

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Stacy15 View Post
                              You are living the life! If I could figure out a way to live just hunting or fishing all day...my dream!
                              I wish I could figure a way to do that too.....I actually work about 45-50 hours a week though. I am a physician with irregular hours, and my home is a 40 minute drive from my practice. I only make the drive 4 days a week though, and my gym is in the town where I work. This means it is usually a 12 hour work day, then 90 min in the gym right after. No other way.

                              Still leaves 3 days to have a little more fun though
                              "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by TheyCallMeLazarus View Post
                                I wish I could figure a way to do that too.....I actually work about 45-50 hours a week though. I am a physician with irregular hours, and my home is a 40 minute drive from my practice. I only make the drive 4 days a week though, and my gym is in the town where I work. This means it is usually a 12 hour work day, then 90 min in the gym right after. No other way.

                                Still leaves 3 days to have a little more fun though
                                What I meant by saying 'you live the life' was that you seem to live a very 'primal' life, which is awesome! Not implying you just hunt all day and don't work - that's what I want to do I only get 2 days a week to try fit it in, and it's not nearly enough!

                                You have a great story about moving back home to the wilderness, doing what makes you happy. Can't wait until I'm able to do the same.

                                And I might be bugging you from rabbit recipes ...

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