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Gettin' All-Primal in the Applachians

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  • #76
    Originally posted by Gravyboat View Post
    I barely do either, honestly, and I'm a native english speaker. When I watch British movies, I need the captions on. Once I went to Barbados (also an english-speaking country, but HEAVILY accented -- it's a very distinct dialect) and I couldn't understand 90% of what anyone said. It was really embarrassing.
    As a Brit I can safely say that the language can change pretty dramatically in as little as a few miles. I to struggle to understand some people from my own county.

    Richard
    It isn't the mountains ahead that wear you out....Its the grain of sand in your shoe.

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    • #77
      Wow crabbcakes,

      your journal sort of exploded since I was here last this morning! You must be the fastest typist in the word, because I suppose with your busy life you cannot spend hours on the computer typing those long posts. So much the better, I get many interesting things to read about life in the US.

      Thanks for your good wishes re the weather. Only 30 degrees today, but sweltering and not a breeze. No balcony here unfortunately. I think I unconsciously compared the weather to Greece because my friend who I spent yesterday afternoon with is Greek, and we must have mentioned it. But yesterday I also felt reminded of the Costa del Sol in Spain where we once spent our vacation. One really understands why the Spaniards value their "siesta" so much ... And speaking of Spain, my saving grace these days is a little Spanish fan (not a ceiling fan but the small, foldable thing that you think of when you imagine flamenco dancers). It is even the real thing; I bought it many years ago at a flea market in Madrid, the famous "Rastro".

      So it is air conditioning? Thanks, I think I succumbed to a typically German mistake here, although I know English and all. It is what many people call "Denglish", a tendency to give all and everything English names (or what people think is English). And AC is "Air Condition" in Germany. You certainly know that a cell phone (mobile phone for the Brits) is a "Handy" in German and everybody thinks that's an English word (well it is, but it doesn't mean "cell phone"). There are many examples, but one I will never forget. There was a fashion trend one summer, a sort of rucksack with only one strap that was worn over the shoulder. Some unfortunate designer named them "Bodybags", and you know what that means ... Oh, wait, I know a better one. When there are soccer championships or things like this, you know how they put up big screens in public places for people to watch the matches? Well, that sort of event is called a "public viewing" in modern "Denglish".

      I found your "tales of Rauch und Feuer" interesting. Something like the second story happened to me too, but there were no firefighters necessary. I had also left something on the stovetop which burned, but hadn't noticed because I was in another room and busy on the computer. Then a neighbour hammered on my door and shouted that black smoke was coming out of my kitchen window. Fortunately it was enough to take the pot off the stovetop and open the windows wide ... Now when I leave the house I always check and double-check if I left the stove on. While talking to my friend yesterday I decided to make a sort of emergency pack to grab in case of a fire - some clothes, extra shoes, photocopies of documents and bank cards, some cash and the like.

      Speaking of my friends, it was unbelievable how fast the fire spread. They live like two hunderd yards from a fire station, and the firefighters arrived in a matter of minutes. But by this time the window panes were already breaking from the high heat. They believe that the toaster in the kitchen was the culprit. (Which shows once more that bread eating can endanger your life.)

      Thanks to all you native speakers for your input about difficulties understanding speakers from other countries. And I thought it was just me because English is not my mother tongue. I exaggerated a bit, because I mostly understand people in Britain when asking for directions or shopping. But last year we made a sort of touristy excursion to London and took a tour on the Thames on one of those little boats. The captain came out on the deck to explain the view, and I literally didn't get a word. This really threw me into a sort of existential crisis. I was like, I earn my living as a translator, mostly for English, and I cannot understand this guy ...

      Crabbcakes, how is your poor cat? Is he feeling better?

      Looking forward to reading from you soon!
      Last edited by Bess58; 08-20-2012, 09:24 AM.

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      • #78
        Originally posted by Richardmac View Post
        As a Brit I can safely say that the language can change pretty dramatically in as little as a few miles. I to struggle to understand some people from my own county.

        Richard
        Since you're from Scotland and we're talking about unintelligible dialects, I'll share with you one of my favorite songs. Enjoy!

        Nae mince in Moray - YouTube

        _-J o u r n a l_--------- ---- ---- --- --- -- -- -

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        • #79
          Originally posted by Richardmac View Post
          As a Brit I can safely say that the language can change pretty dramatically in as little as a few miles. I to struggle to understand some people from my own county.

          Richard
          Richard - if you are back here, would you tell me how it is with the Scottish and how you all prefer to label yourselves? I mean, you just called yourself a Brit, which I understand, but I kind of thought most of the people north of the border would prefer to be called Scottish, as I think you have a parlaiment now and all...?

          (For a "dumb American" story - I started off my working relationship with my now-good friend from Glasgow by calling her "Scotch" all the time... guess how long it took her to correct me!)
          Last edited by Crabbcakes; 08-20-2012, 06:40 PM.
          I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

          Comment


          • #80
            Howdy Bess!

            LOL!! Your Denglish Geschichten sind einfach toll! I am still giggling... body bags! You should have heard Mr. Crabbcakes on his last visit to Germany to visit me (still dating, we were) - he was trying to impress my favorite aunt and uncle, but was decently drunk as it was New Year's Eve in the Dorf - anyway, he wanted to say "Ich bin betrunken", but what came out was "Ich habe ertrunken"...

            I have a Scottish one for you - my Glaswegian friend one day asked me to (and I quote...) "Knock me up in the morning." I actually choked on my own spit. Noticing my distress, she (in all seriousness) asked me if that were not possible... which made me choke all the harder! I finally was able to tell her what Americans understand under "knocking (someone) up", and that she surely didn't want ME to attempt that! (Do you know what it means, Bess?? And what my friend meant? Perhaps a puzzle for you...)

            Speaking of language crises - at one point in my life in Germany I thought I had the language pretty much in grip - until I went to a Bavarian village for a vacation (Donau-Wald). I can't tell you how humbling that was. And then I decided to do one better and stay with friends at Lake Thun in die Schweiz. My ego came back as flat as a pancake. The only reason it wasn't as flat as a French crepe is that I could still READ everything. (But the Alps are heaven on Earth!) So I was by then totally prepared when I went to Sylt and heard Friesisch.

            No, Cat isn't doing well. He is still not eating, and now he will not clean himself either, so Second and Fourth took the animal-shampoo foam dispenser and wipes and cleaned him up while I was at therapy today. He now drools slowly as he hangs out between the toilet and the wall. Second and Fourth informed me that he purred all through the ministrations, so I know they were absolutely gentle - as I knew they would be. He isn't vocal right now, which leads me to hope that any pain isn't intense at this point. Tomorrow morning I will call the vet and have a conference with her. Thanks for asking - right now it is kind of surreal that he is that sick.

            Just to top off this post, I have a local country-ism for you (country-ism is my made-up term, but Americans make stuff up all the time and get away with it) - have you ever heard someone in those American movies say "Keep 'er 'tween the ditches!" ? It is a common phrase around here. I'll explain that one next post.

            Until then!

            Translation: "Ich bin betrunken." is "I'm drunk!"---"Ich habe ertrunken." means "I have drowned."
            Last edited by Crabbcakes; 08-21-2012, 04:14 PM. Reason: added translations
            I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

            Comment


            • #81
              Hello crabbcakes,

              this is going to be a short post as the weather has cooled down and I'm off to do everything that I postponed during the extreme heat - to the pharmacy for my meds, to the farmer's market to get my "Hühnerklein" (chicken parts) for my chicken bone broth etc. Also, my brain is working again, so I hope to get some translating done.

              Sorry to hear about your cat. Looks like there are some difficult decisions ahead. I wish you and your family lots of strength for the coming time.

              Yes, I could solve your little quiz about "knocking up". LEO-dictionary had the answer. Now I understand your embarassment. Google also told me about "keeping her / it between the ditches", but I'll wait for your explanation to see if I got it right. You see, finding out things like that is an important part of my job. Of course, an author writing his/her novel for American readers doesn't think a moment about making things easy for potential translators. So I am used to googling the most obscure expressions or facts. Thank god for the internet! I already was a translator before normal people had access to the internet. At this time, it was scouring libraries, dictionaries and encyclopedias. You know, for trivia that you only know when you have lived in the respective country. Once I even had to hire an American via a translating agency to answer my questions and totally payed through the nose (I love to collect expressions like that, and you just contributed to my collection with your post.)

              Schweizerdeutsch is a tough one! But I can tell you that even in German TV Schweizerdeutsch gets subtitled because Deutsche can't understand it either.

              Now I'm off to take a shower and get my errands done. Bis demnächst!
              Last edited by Bess58; 08-21-2012, 03:53 AM.

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              • #82
                Hey Bess!

                Cooler weather in Koeln - toll! I am off today on a short trip - I am going to Third's school to deliver her locker shelves and assorted stuff in advance of her first day of school tomorrow. She has so much that it is hard to give it all to the bus aides (on buses delivering special-needs kids there is the bus driver, and then there are bus aides, and bus aides are even-tempered adults familiar with the quirks of special-needs kids/adults and who do all the peace-keeping, safety stuff, and general happy-making with the riders so the bus driver can concentrate on the actual driving) - between bus wheelchair ramps and stuff, they have enough to do.

                Which brings up a batch of memories... when Third was younger, it was simply impossible for her to stay in her bus seat. That - and she would unbuckle the seat belts of simply everybody around her. One of Third's challenges is she has extremely (ahem) "busy fingers" as we call them. Once Third unbuckled Fourth's car seat during a family ride and I didn't catch it - and Hubby ended up having to make a screeching stop in traffic to avoid an accident... well, Fourth was right behind the driver's seat, and the whole car seat just tipped forward - the top edge of the car seat (it was one of those toddler models with the very tall backs) ended up resting against the headrest of the driver's seat and Fourth just hung there, under the car seat, limbs dangling, and wondering what the hell just happened.

                Third also had this really annoying habit of opening car doors at highway speeds. Once, she did that when I had all four in the car (you should know that between the oldest and the youngest there is only a six year age spread, so back then I had the equivalent of a toddler, a very young Third, and two barely-older young children), and I was so completely incensed due to fear shock (coupled with the seat belt trick...) that I pulled off the road, walked to her car door and slapped her hand. It was then that I discovered (thanks to hubby, upon hearing the story) that our car doors had levers that you could manipulate that would allow a door to be opened only from the outside. So for ages any adult guests riding in the back seat of our cars would have to wait for someone to open the door for them.

                Sooooo, knowing about her aversion to rider safety, Third ended up being placed in a harness on school bus rides. I tell you, this was one Houdini-worthy contraption. The material was the same stuff as heavy-duty seat belt strapping. Sheep wool across the shoulders for comfort, massive zipper up the back so Third couldn't undo the thing, and big 'ole industrial D-rings sewn into it in back at that particular no-can-reach point where the shoulder blades are so nobody can fiddle behind themselves and unclip. The bus has a few dedicated seats that have bench straps installed in just the right way so a person wearing the harness can just sit down and the bus aide can clip the D-rings into clips, and voila - secured human.

                Because a kid is being truly "restrained" in such a way, law over here requires a doctor's prescription for the harness, which our pediatrician very gladly gave to me at the beginning of each school year. Third wore that thing for years, and I was glad for it. When the bus drivers (we have had the same bus driver-aide combination for YEARS, and they learn all the special little tricks and personalities of all their riders...) told me the school transportation head honchos had had a conference about Third and decided that it was time to transition her out of the harness, I initially refused. They gave me a little more time, and just did it anyway. I was kind of pissed, but then, I am sort of known at Third's school for being resistant to change where Third is concerned...

                It did work out. Each day, when Third's bus arrived at the end of our country driveway, bus driver and aide (they are tight friends in real life as well, so collusion is easy for them) would beam at me and say stuff like "Alison did a terrific job staying in her seat for the WHOLE trip!" and Third, hearing the compliment, would beam back... how could I be nasty to them in front of Third when she was so obviously proud of herself?? That - and she totally got bribed with chewing gum by those two... Today Third stays in her seat without any further help, so it did work out very well in spite of the mama, and we all still have a wonderful relationship.

                "and totally payed through the nose"
                a little correction - great use of the expression, but "payed" is spelled "paid". I am absolutely sure you know that, but I couldn't resist pointing that out today.

                So, Bess, I'm off. I wish I could be walking the streets of Koeln with you - I miss Europe in general, and that sounds just wonderful today. See ya soon!
                I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                • #83
                  Crabbcakes, I love your journal. I like your attitude and style. Consider me a subscriber.

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                  • #84
                    Originally posted by MrsJenx View Post
                    Crabbcakes, I love your journal. I like your attitude and style. Consider me a subscriber.
                    Think there will be a lot of subscribers, I've almost forgotten what Journals are for, Crabbcakes you should write a book. I have been embroiled reading about your life.
                    I read a BillBryson book a couple of years go were he had walked the Applachian Way (I think it was called.) and your title drew my eye.
                    Here in Liverpool, UK I work in one of the Universities doing finances etc. I have 3 boys aged 19, 16 and 9 and we are a football mad family. (like a lot of people in the City.)
                    Most people in the US have only heard of Liverpool cos of the Beatles. We are on the coast and have a couple of beaches etc to visit within a couple of miles. Though our Summer has been rubbish so not much sunbathing etc.
                    We went to Florida a couple of years ago and loved it, going back next year.
                    Quite a bad financial depression in the UK at the moment with lots of unemployment, low pay etc.in our part of the UK. We have been fortunate personally that is hasn't affected us, But who knows the future.
                    Was laughing reading about Third and the bus.you are very inspirational.

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by MrsJenx View Post
                      Crabbcakes, I love your journal. I like your attitude and style. Consider me a subscriber.
                      Thank You!!

                      I am still humbled by anyone who comes this way at all, and to have subscribers feels very unreal, if you know what I mean. Thanks for the definite ego boost today in letting me know you are here - and subscribing! I look forward to hearing from you again!f
                      I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                      • #86
                        I pop in daily too
                        I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

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                        • #87
                          Originally posted by annedawso View Post
                          I read a BillBryson book a couple of years go were he had walked the Applachian Way (I think it was called.) and your title drew my eye.
                          I think that book is "A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering the Appalachian Trail", published in 1998. I haven't read it, but it is on my get-to-it-sometime list. When I am all-Primal and toned and have better cardiovascular endurance, I would like to do that with the kids. I bet it will be a life-changing experience.

                          So you all are soccer nuts, eh? Is there anybody in all of England who ISN'T?? And maybe you can shed light on something I have been wondering for some time - what is it that drives soccer hooligans (at least the English version)?? We are just as obsessed with American football, but you don't hear about whole sections of downtown being trashed because of the Super Bowl, and we are supposed to be the more violent country versus most of Europe.

                          Liverpool sounds nice, being along the coast, with universities there, too. But the name is kinda' unfortunate. Do you have any idea where the "liver" in Liverpool originates?? Anglo-Saxon holdover?

                          I understand about financial depressions - this area started that way and has never improved since. But after 7 years of living here, my daughters know how to value a small gift from someone who has very little, and that is a phenomenal life lesson. I grew up on public welfare, and while I never wanted them to know the raw side of that kind of life, I did want them to somehow get some experience with humility, and this fits the bill nicely.

                          I'll tell you another story about Third (I have an almost endless supply of them...) since the bus thing was funny - she potty-trained very late, between 7 and 8 years of age due to chronic diarrhea added onto the rest of her challenges. So, we have a pretty rigorous library schedule, as we homeschool and all and I use several libraries to supply our book cravings. Third, of course, comes along. Back then all she knew how to do was find the DVD's and then play with the toys in the Children's Section, but hey - you have to start somewhere. Like any well-planned Children's Section, there is a potty within immediate reach, but not immediate enough for Third... she had a little difficulty learning the signals her body gives her when it is time to eliminate and so always ended up in distress - as in RUNNING for the bathroom. Well, whatever the reason, she always decided to begin undressing as she was underway to the toilet... I had a kid sprinting along the wall, past the elevator, as the potty is located just to the right of the lift, dropping her drawers along the way. Before she even got to the elevator you could see butt crack. As she reached the restroom door, you were treated to a pretty comprehensive view of her choice of underwear for the day and the fact that she wasn't a sufferer of precocious puberty as witnessed by the full-frontal anatomy... Thank the stars she always made it to the john in time before the bladder (and whatever else) cut loose, so I never had spills of that kind to apologize for.

                          If you want to hear what she replaced that behavior with (once we managed to work it out), just ask...
                          I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                          • #88
                            Originally posted by badgergirl View Post
                            I pop in daily too
                            Yeeeeee haw!! I may just be a wee bit popular for the first time in my life! (My daughters and Hubby don't count... they will always say they like me just so I cook their next dinner...)

                            Thanks, badgergirl! If you stick around, be warned that you will be grilled on life as it is led by Aussies - I have an insatiable curiosity that way!
                            I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                            • #89
                              What, you don't want to ask me about what it's like living in Ohio?? You're so xenophilic, Crabbcakes! Geez!

                              _-J o u r n a l_--------- ---- ---- --- --- -- -- -

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                              • #90
                                Originally posted by Gravyboat View Post
                                What, you don't want to ask me about what it's like living in Ohio?? You're so xenophilic, Crabbcakes! Geez!
                                *chuckles* You'll just have to be content with the fact that you will probably end up being the only one on the MDA to actually see me in person anytime in the forseeable future (unless I win big in a lottery and try PrimalCon 'cause I think it would be neat to actually see Sisson in person)...
                                I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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