Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

waiting for the whoosh - badgergirl's journal

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I am dying. I ate rice cooked in chicken bone broth and now I have digestive failure. What gives? Okay today was a crazy-greedy day, hey, it's Saturday! And, yes, I drank a few glasses of wine - not too many! - nothing to make my stomach cramp and give me pain. I have no idea, but let me tell you I am not happy.

    Early night tonight; see if I can't sleep it off.

    Last night I barely slept so perhaps I'm sickening for something.

    Husband and I quote the scene from Tomb Raider (in the helicopter) for news like this: "how fascinating".

    Speaking of the husband, he's chained to his laptop and sweating over 3DS Max. I hear the occasional swear word muttered, but basically he's in his own zone of suffering and I'm in mine.
    I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

    Comment


    • Oh. Bugger.

      Long, hard weekend. Full of chores - house has to be clean for in laws' babysitting visit tomorrow - childcare (we went to the park and tried out small boy's roller skates - now I am sore from holding him up) and other husband-related duties (attending his best friend's birthday party on his behalf and giving him as much space and time as possible so that he can cram for tomorrow's interviews.

      Food choices (after Saturday's accidental food poisoning by under-cooked chicken skin - can't blame rice - I had three bouts of quite horrifically compelling diarrhoea overnight [how fascinating]) have been abysmal. Husband and I have both been struggling with insomnia. I hate getting this pysched up over an interview for a three-month gig, but even three months of employ is better than none. I resent making sacrifices (and I do it every time) for things that may or may not come to pass. Let's hope that it does and that it leads on to bigger and better things.

      I had plans goddamn it: I was going to finish the quilt. But it has been all hands to the pump. Only my husband would be mad enough to attempt learning two high-end, complex software packages (3DS Max and some sort of game engine, I forget what it is called - Unity) in 48 hours.

      I hope we sleep tonight. Husband looks like a zombie - not a great interview look.

      My work week is going to be manic...it all comes at once.
      Last edited by badgergirl; 01-20-2013, 01:38 AM.
      I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

      Comment


      • The weekly fast has begun. I'm now pretty much convinced this plays into binge/purge cycles, but since I eat like a possessed woman at the weekends I've sort of trapped myself into needing to fast come Monday. Hmm.

        All the manic-panic-work-like-a-loon has passed and now it's just two interviews and wait and see. I'm so tired I want to sleep at/under my desk. Lord only knows how husband is coping - perhaps he'll crash later, once the excitement is over.

        ETA: husband says interview went okay and he'll hear within a day or two. Three months has been reduced to six weeks though.

        Meanwhile, I've got a ton of work to do.

        B: coffee made w/semi skimmed milk
        L: IF
        D: ham, tuna mayo, an apple, lots of double cream
        Last edited by badgergirl; 01-20-2013, 11:54 PM. Reason: dinner
        I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

        Comment


        • Husband has heard that if the company gets the contract he gets the job. Fingers and limbs remain tightly crossed.

          B: coffee and a handful of nuts
          L: tiny piece of stilton, dried fruit
          D: barbecue pork ribs, salads; cherries

          Still hungry...
          Last edited by badgergirl; 01-22-2013, 12:27 AM.
          I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by badgergirl View Post
            Thank you! It's a mixed blessing as the longer I stay there the more my career (yeah, right - I used to have one) goes retrograde. I really miss London and being that city girl with a job that sent me Stateside regularly.
            What did you do? And where did you end up traveling over here? I like cities, too, but with me raising kids, I am well-placed living here in the sticks. Suburbia just isn't for me... I guess I am a gal of extremes - one kind of jungle or the other. And I can get a helluva lot more house for my buck here in the country than I could in a city!

            Originally posted by badgergirl View Post
            This job, although only a three-month contract to begin with, sounds right up husband's dark, narrow alley: a defence contractor who wants to develop mobile apps requesting someone with a knowledge of animation and anatomy. Sounds grimtastic to me, but husband is pretty keen (I'm keen for him to have a job) and excited about what soldiers with mobiles might be playing that requires a knowledge of anatomy to develop. Hmmm. Perhaps it's a medical app (she said hopefully) rather than the more obvious gory shoot out.
            Hubby has his degree in chemistry, but works for an environmental clean-up company, project managing, but mostly writing data-crunching computer programs that track lots of things - land acquisitions for state departments of transportation, underground tank farms for military air bases... Lots of stuff.

            Originally posted by badgergirl View Post
            (after Saturday's accidental food poisoning by under-cooked chicken skin - can't blame rice - I had three bouts of quite horrifically compelling diarrhoea overnight [how fascinating]).
            Hope you are feeling better!! I once watched my best friend spend the night on the toilet - literally. She had some horrific bug that just made it not worth her while to get off the loo, so she pulled a tall, lidded clothes hamper over to her, draped a towel over it, set a bowl atop (came out both ends...), leaned over it, and slept between bouts. Lordy, stomach/intestinal bugs are the worst!

            It is funny, in a sick way (pun intended), watching everybody's puking style here at Crabbcakes Manor. Most of my kids are quiet retchers, but I do have one that is soooo loud and stereotypical-sounding, I just may record her for use in Hollywood movies. When she is afflicted, the whole house gets to hear.

            Originally posted by badgergirl View Post
            Husband has heard that if the company gets the contract he gets the job. Fingers and limbs remain tightly crossed.
            Sweet! Paid employment is the best (assuming you like the job)! I am curious, too, what that app will turn into!!

            We are having a cold snap here. 12 degrees F is the high for today, 6 degrees F is the low for tonight. I hauled the kerosene heater behemoth out last night, just in case. Last year the power went out on the coldest week of winter, and to top it off, our whole-house generator blew up at the same time, so we had to scramble to find heat for this all-electric house, and ended up buying two of these (relatively big house) along with two smaller ceramic propane heaters. We now have power this time around, and the generator is fixed, but this is my magickal way of ensuring all stays well... Third's school has a two-hour delay this a.m. They always do this when the temps are this low - gives the weather time to heat up a few degrees before all those wheelchair kids have to brave the cold to load on the ramp-and-lift equipped buses.
            I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

            Comment


            • Once upon a time I worked for a fancy-pants PR agency on their corp editing/production team. I was the only European-based member of the team - it's a global agency, but grew out of the Pacific northwest. This was brilliant as it meant an annual week or fortnight trip to Portland, Oregon, to attend team events. On the back of this I would usually tack on some holiday and visit best friend who, at that time, lived in Northampton, MA (where the coffee is strong and so are the women). I also managed, once, to tack on a visit to the NY office and stayed with a team-mate in Queens. I've spent a fair amount of time in New England over the years, but the vast expanse between the two coasts and anything Southern is a mystery to me. One day a long road trip beckons (I hope).

              I miss London - the buzz, the pace of live and, more than anything, understanding how things work - more than I ever thought possible. I also miss English countryside: the damp smell of the earth, the lead-grey skies, the rolling green hills... I also miss snow, not that we get the full monty like you do.

              If the company gets the work husband will be working on some kind of superhero/comic book tie in, nothing like what the rest of the company does. It'll be a very strange way in, but husband seems quite positive and thinks that even if this job doesn't come good they might well contact him for something else.

              B: two eggs scrambled in butter; coffee
              L: IF
              D: steak and salads, portobello mushroom; cherries

              I'm going back to my old ways. I've had my head turned by some of the threads recently, but I'm not a moar fat, moar meat, fewer meals girl. The podge was not shifting and I was finding the fasting both stressful and counterproductive. I don't mind slow and steady, but stasis is no good. That said, I do like not needing to pack myself a lunch. I'll see how I go.
              Last edited by badgergirl; 01-22-2013, 11:38 PM.
              I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

              Comment


              • B: two eggs, you know the drill, scrambled in butter; coffee
                L: IF
                D: avo, tuna, sour cream, two portobello mushrooms cooked in butter, spoonful of carrot and beet salad; cherries, dried apple rings; bottle of 13-year-old shiraz (past it, frankly) Yeah. Not proud. Husband went out to hang with his buddies and I self medicated like it was a w/e or summat.

                Still no news on husband's job, but in some ways that is good, right, it means the company is working out a plan of action, rather than the deal is off the table - I hope. Hmmm.

                What else is news? Not much. Husband and I are getting on better recently, which is a huge relief, but life seems rather empty, joyless. I'm at a loss at how to create joy - unlike Ani DeFranco I am not a joyful girl. Joy used to come from being surrounded by joyful friends.
                Last edited by badgergirl; 01-24-2013, 04:11 AM. Reason: different dinner
                I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

                Comment


                • A tale of two trees or welcome to Australia

                  We rent. In our back garden are two trees: a lemon tree and an apple tree.

                  I am used to the fecundity of citrus trees thanks to a year spent in Greece, but believe me - this lemon tree is the Duggar tree. Lemons fall to the ground to rot, despite harvesting sacks of lemons to give away, let alone the lemons we use ourselves to flavour chickens and water and cakes... That tree is prolific. The small boy and I put more than 100 lemons on the compost heap last weekend when I was worried about the scent of rotting citrus perfuming our drying laundry.

                  The apple tree. The apple tree struggles. The first year we were here - no apples. I pruned that tree hard. The second year - three tasteless, Golden Delicious-type sad apples (water and sugar in a green skin - tasteless and woolly); I pruned again and this year - after a monster pruning session (I got a saw) - we had more than ten apples.

                  Then the parrots came.

                  Result?

                  No apples.

                  PARROTS ATE OUR APPLES. WE HAVE LEMONS ROTTING ON THE GROUND.

                  Truly, Australia is another world.
                  Last edited by badgergirl; 01-24-2013, 04:08 AM.
                  I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by badgergirl View Post
                    Truly, Australia is another world.
                    Yeah, but one that sounds really, really tempting as I sit here in single-digit (Fahrenheit) cold... and top it off with those interesting Aussie accents...

                    Dunno' what it is about accents - can't get enough of them. The non-American/Canadian-yet-from-an-English-speaking-country type, that is. The kids and I just finished the DVD set of "Long Way Down" and the Yankee Kids Crabbcakes could listen to Ewan McGregor endlessly.

                    Which brings me to my Question of the Day for badger - is Small Boy sporting an English accent from his parents or an Aussie one from his environment?? My girls open their mouths to utter a generic American Midwest, no country twang. Although, if you get Second mad enough, stuff like "dawg" comes out from her time in New Jersey.

                    Crabbcakes still has leftovers from a major chunk of childhood spent in central Texas. Like "creek" being pronounced as "crick", among other stuff.
                    I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
                      Crabbcakes still has leftovers from a major chunk of childhood spent in central Texas. Like "creek" being pronounced as "crick", among other stuff.
                      Wait.... It ISN'T pronunced that way??? Well cut my legs off and call me Shorty!

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by ssn679doc View Post
                        Wait.... It ISN'T pronunced that way??? Well cut my legs off and call me Shorty!
                        !

                        You will get this... My mom is a German immigrant to the US with no discernible German accent, my dad is a Jersey boy born and raised, I spent my time in Killeen TX, and when my dad finally got transferred out of Texas to go back overseas, we went to visit the family in Jersey before we boarded the plane - and my never-ever-left-New Jersey-once grandma decided to give ME elocution lessons!
                        I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
                          !

                          You will get this...
                          You sir, give me FAR too much credit!!! lol In truth I do. I left Home in 1968.... I've been gone longer than I lived there and have been gone sooooo long that you can't tell where I come from, but let me spend 10 minutes with Texans, and you'd think I never left....

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
                            is Small Boy sporting an English accent from his parents or an Aussie one from his environment?
                            Small boy will proudly tell you he is 'English and Oztrayalien'. Small children always seem to have more of an accent than the adults in their community, no? Perhaps it's because they are still learning, but the key markers of any accent seem more pronounced in the youngsters.

                            Actually, only one of small boy's parents is English - me, obvs - but his father's accent is very soft and we do listen to a lot of English voices (story dramatisations and Radio 4). Small boy has slightly less of an ocker accent than his fellow five year olds, but the difference is probably only something a parent's ear would pick up.

                            He's probably the only five year old who gets asked 'is that a statement or a question?' every time he finishes what he says with a rising intonation. I CANNOT ABIDE Australian question intonation and make every effort to stamp it out.

                            What we have noticed most is that creche and kinder are staffed, not exclusively, but enough for us to be able to hear it in small boy's vocabulary, with young and, sad to say, poorly educated women. It seems that somewhere along the line girls with low ambition/intellect/self-esteem choose one of two routes: childcare or beauty. When we moved small boy from creche to kinder I was happy to note that the room leaders were older (30s-40s rather than 19-25) and had a bit about them.

                            I fully expect his accent to change again when he starts school - next week! - and he is exposed to new voices. His teachers are drawn from many nationalities and perhaps there will be a wider variety in the students too.

                            As for my accent, it is very different to my parents' (actually, they have different accents to each other - mum has cockney/Irish undertones [fi-lim, for example] and my father has a gentle oyle o' wight accent, rare these days) and brother's (generic country/southern English - a bit like Stephen Merchant only nowhere near as communicative). I suspect I am beginning to pick up Australian turns of phrase if not the whole accent-vocabulary-intonation shebang.
                            Last edited by badgergirl; 01-24-2013, 02:26 PM.
                            I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

                            Comment


                            • Just looked up your links - interesting. I did the same thing with my older two in New Jersey - to make an accent situation worse, we had neighbors on the one side from Staten Island, and neighbors on the other from Brooklyn, all while living in the thick of the Garden State. My girls had regular speech lessons, which my well-spoken and solidly Midwestern in-laws were only too happy to help provide during visits.

                              Now I have the same situation, just country-fried. You would not believe the twang and bad basic grammar out here! I have absolutely nothing against local accent color in a voice, just because people really can't help it, but when a strong accent is coupled with ungrammatical speech at all times??! NOOO

                              At this point, my girls may add a little local color here and there, accent and/or vocabulary, for some fun, but their default speech is and will be (if I am alive to say anything about it) educated, grammatical, non-nasal, well-modulated Midwestern. My niece and nephews out here have grown up with the local speech, and they are not capable of ramping up their game when needed. I see that as a future handicap - it is why I pushed so hard in New Jersey, not because there is anything inherently wrong with being instantly pegged as a kid from "Joisey" by the accent, but because the one-two combo of strong accent and whatever grammatical foolishness is endemic to any place isn't the best first impression in general. Same goes for my current neck of the woods. I have a habit of saying "crick" at home in casual conversation, but I can turn that particular button on and off in public, and therein lies my litmus test.

                              You are right to watch his speech at this age - if left completely alone, those habits are almost impossible to root out.
                              Last edited by Crabbcakes; 01-24-2013, 02:45 PM.
                              I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

                              Comment


                              • I can speak oyle o'wight when I want to and there are some verbal quirks that I enjoy (somewhen) while others ("I was" + "gerund") that are the very devil. I've taught myself to say either as ay-ther instead of ee-ther, but my father thinks I'm a traitor and a terrible snob. However, as I drill into the small boy, language matters and learning to speak well is very important.

                                I (proud parent alert) am constantly impressed by small boy's vocabulary. Truly, he speaks with a range and sophistication that astonishes me. I put this down to the sheer number of books we read and the amount of time husband spends chatting to small boy.

                                School is going to be totally amazing...
                                Here are the edited highlights from the welcome email the head sent out:
                                Hi everyone,

                                Candlebark is beginning its eighth year, with record enrolments, and daily enquiries for places. However, for the time being, I am capping numbers at 130, until we see how that dynamic works. Although we have permission to go to 196, it wouldn't surprise me if somewhere around 130 proves to be about the right number for us.

                                I'm feeling very warmed up for an exciting year, although to be honest right now I'm slightly jetlagged, having flown from Uganda to Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur to Melbourne last weekend… a circuitous route indeed. I was doing workshops in schools in Kenya and Uganda all last week, with teachers and students, and had some eye opening, even eye-popping, experiences.
                                I’ve come back more convinced than ever that we’re taking the right path in the way we approach education here at C’bark. But we keep looking to reinvent ourselves, and to that end the 2013 teachers will gather here tomorrow to spend the day with the guy who is probably Australia's leading authority on technology and education. Mark Sparvell, after winning the Asia-Pacific title as Microsoft's 2009 Most Innovative Teacher went on to Brazil, where he subsequently won the world title! He has been principal at Kadina Primary School in South Australia, where one of his projects was to connect six schools over 5000km across three states in Australia so that they could "think out loud together". Mark facilitated via a live video feed, while the students brainstormed on a virtual whiteboard, asked questions by webcam and debated topics such as the meaning of a fair go.
                                Working in a district capacity, Mark also invited students across different age groups and school systems to explore values and environmental projects in a virtual community of up to 30 sites. In his quest to explore the possibilities of technology in education, Mark’s credo is that he is willing to "fail early and fail often". And he's met some tricky technical challenges, like leading a lesson that connected students and teachers on boats near Kangaroo Island via a video link-up to experts on the mainland. Students at more than 20 remote locations joined in, asking questions about dolphins and whales that were answered on the spot.
                                Mark says. "Whether it's on the back of a boat or in a remote community, my classroom is wherever my laptop is." Mark has also incorporated Nintendo DS’s, iTouch and netbooks into learning experiences.
                                Mark is also a strong believer in values-based education, and has coordinated National values education projects. He currently works for Principals Australia, as an executive consultant in IT and innovation. He frequently travels around Australia and overseas to present at conferences, and we are very fortunate to have him spending the day with our staff.
                                As always, there are plenty of exciting new things to see and experience at Candlebark this year. Definitely the most exciting is the acquisition of our own fire engine, which will help us deal quickly with any spot fires. Almost as exciting is the line-up of new staff. Of course, two of them are far from new: Sarita Ryan and Wendy Wright have both taught here before, with great success. They left for the best of reasons, because they wanted further adventures! Sarita went to Finland to study for her Master's degree, in the course of which she did a good deal of work in Africa for several international agencies. Sarita now has a Master’s degree in Education (specialisation in Development and International Cooperation) from the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.

                                Wendy and her husband Ross went to Fiji, to teach in an international school.

                                Sarita will be taking on a new role here, as Primary Coordinator. Although your first `port-of-call’ will still be the class co-ordinator, please feel free to include Sarita in discussions of any queries, concerns or issues regarding children in primary grades at Candlebark. I'll send the list of class coordinators for 2013 out next week.
                                Wendy will be primarily responsible for the Prep grade in 2013.
                                Also joining us is, as I mentioned in an e-mail late last year, Terry Willis , who in a previous life was a Props Master who worked on the sets of such film and television productions as Ned Kelly, Big Brother and Neighbours. Terry is a keen cyclist, kayaker, surfer, and a passionate gardener. Terry will be here two days a week, teaching Manual Arts, including metalwork and woodwork, to students from grade 4 upwards (not grade 5, as previously advertised). Each of these students will do Manual Arts for two or three terms a year, using the area next to the art room, which has been converted by Bob over the Christmas holidays into a nice big space perfect for Manual Arts and Art.
                                In order to incorporate Manual Arts, there will be a reduction in the amount of Art, classroom music and dance for students from grade 4 upwards. In future, these students will have the subjects for two or three terms a year instead of four. We'll review the situation again at the end of 2013, to see how it has worked.
                                As most of you know, Lizanne Richards left Candlebark at the end of 2012 to prepare for the birth of her and Tim's first child. I'm delighted to say that the happy event took place without a hitch just two days ago, when Lizanne gave birth to Amelia Constance Richards, just forty-five minutes after the hour drive to Sunshine Hospital. Amelia weighed in at 8 pounds (3.66kg) with a head full of red hair, and mother and daughter are both well. I've had no report on the father's condition.

                                Teaching singing in first term, in Lizanne's place, is Heather Stewart , a vocalist, violinist, teacher and researcher, who has her bachelor of music degree (with honours), is a Master of Arts, has a graduate diploma in teaching, and her AmusA. Heather spent a day here last year, and delighted the students with her zest, humour and musicality.

                                We also welcome our first native-born French teacher: Steve Pollett. Steve may not seem like a typical French name, but his parents named him after Steve McQueen! Steve grew up in Lille, and gained degrees in environmental science, landscape design, and education from Lille University. Among Steve's other experiences are working as human resources consultant for the industry and commerce chamber of Lille, where he specialised in inducting and training young apprentices for companies, teaching French and science in a primary school in Togo, West Africa, working for Green Made Easy in Melbourne last year, and organising and running science and sport activities for children aged 5 to 15 in Montréal. He has also taught school groups how to grow plants and how to increase biodiversity in an urban area, in a program aimed at cultivating social cohesion in disadvantaged neighbourhoods by gardening. He has designed, made and marketed a collection of leathergoods and accessories, been involved in the restoration of historic buildings in Denmark and Sweden, is a passionate cyclist, and enjoys hiking, camping, gardening, paragliding and playing the flute.

                                In 2013 we are expanding the French program so that it will now begin in Grade 2, with two lessons a week for all classes.

                                2013 is also exciting for us because it is the first time we have offered Year 10. Although we have only a small group, we are hoping to build on this start in years to come, as it has become obvious over the years that the transition to other schools is likely to be much more manageable and effective if it takes place from Candlebark at the end of Year 10.

                                John
                                I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X