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  • i think the tougher population is women over 60. We have a few men over 60 who are doing quite well indeed (they seem to take to it like ducks to water), but with women, it seems to be quite different.

    I don't have any information that can help you, though. I didn't do the deep ketosis bit, so I have no clue there. I'm also younger (36) and I have no direct knowledge of menopause (post or otherwise) and it's impact here with diet. I honestly just do not know.

    But, I do believe that one way or another, you'll figure it out. You have a clear goal in mind -- to live well as you get older. And that's more than enough to keep you motivated. You'll find the right way!

    Sorry that I couldn't help, though.

    ---------

    PB,

    still thinking of you guys and hoping that you are doing well.

    Comment


    • snauzoo Check out "The Schwarzbein Principle II" She believes that some people need a steady amount of carbs throughout the day for metabolism and hormone issues. We are all different and have to find the right combination that will work for us. VLC hasn't worked well for me even though it does for Paleobird and others.
      Primal since 9/24/2010
      "Our greatest foes, and whom we must chiefly combat, are within." Miguel de Cervantes

      Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools
      MFP username: MDAPebbles67

      Comment


      • Originally posted by onalark View Post
        Ack. Sorry. I'm getting maudlin. It's not fair. It's life. It's never fair.
        I agree.

        Originally posted by jacmac View Post
        PB what a journey you and your dad are travelling together!
        Such a gift of time you have been given, the fact that you are not in full time work and can spend the time with him as required is such a gift, but I can also imagine that you are feeling quite exhausted. Can I repeat those wise words again "time belong" as a reminder that this time will never come again.
        Love and light from OZ.
        Jackie
        Thank you, Jackie.

        Originally posted by zoebird View Post
        Hoping you are doing well!
        Hangin in there.

        Originally posted by Snauzoo View Post
        Hi PB,
        I have been off the board here for a while. I read your stuff on ketosis and have question for you that anyone on this thread can answer if they know. Regarding upper limit of carbs. I took my ideal body weight in lbs and convert to kg and got 62. So that means my max carbs is 31? I have been doing a primal version of Atkins induction (using only real food, no fake stuff) and have not lost an ounce in 2 months. Sticking with 20 and getting most from raw veggies and the rest from cooked low carb veggies. Zero fruit, zero starches, safe or otherwise, only heavy cream or half and half in my coffee. Zero nuts or seeds, no artificial sweeteners since there are no proteins or low carb veggies that need sweetening. I have extremely high cholesterol, testosterone, zero estradiol, low normal thyroid function for first time in my life after going low carb, and I'm 15 years postmenopausal. I think I may need hormones fixed before weightloss. I had PCOS, and apparently that does not go away after cessation of menses, and actually can get worse once all estrogen is gone.

        Wondering if I should up my carbs a teeny bit. My question is basically this - where did this formula come from? I have the Phinney and Volek book on order at amazon, so if it is in there just let me know.

        There is a total dearth of info in this community for the over 65 crowd. I want to fix my health before I am forced onto Medicare. I just turned 64.
        31 would be the magic number according to Dr. Jan Kwasniewski's Optimal Diet plan, but then there are lots of experts with plans. The other thing you need to take into consideration is calories. You can not just glug down a bunch of cream and think those calories don't count. Low carb allows you to feel fuller longer so that reducing calories becomes easy and not torturous. You still have to reduce calories, though. Anyone who tells you about magical metabolic advantages to low carb is selling you fairy tales.

        Originally posted by Pebbles67 View Post
        snauzoo Check out "The Schwarzbein Principle II" She believes that some people need a steady amount of carbs throughout the day for metabolism and hormone issues. We are all different and have to find the right combination that will work for us. VLC hasn't worked well for me even though it does for Paleobird and others.
        Yep. Lots of experts. Lots of plans.


        I have been a bit occupied lately as I'm sure you can all understand. Physically I am not doing much of anything but I am still feeling pretty exhausted.

        The other night at dinner Dad asked me, "Why do you keep calling me 'Dad'?"


        Oh.



        Then the next morning he knew exactly who I was and everything was fine. It comes and goes. The other day he took my hand and said, "I'm really sorry I forgot that you were my wife." He thought I was my Mom (I look a lot like her and she passed away at 60 so I'm not too far away from his last memories of her. Friends who knew her also have said that it's almost spooky when i answer the telephone because my voice sounds so much like hers.)


        We had a neurology appointment last week and the good news is that Dad's condition has a name, "Multi Infarct Dementia". The bad news is that it doesn't get better. I had been hoping that some of the mental fogginess was caused by the heart not pumping as well as it should, therefore not getting enough oxygen all around. The neurologist said that that would cause sleepiness, muscle fatigue, dizziness, and purple feet (check, check, check and check) but not memory loss. That is all on the infarctions.


        Crap.



        Thank you all for being there and being so caring and supportive.
        Last edited by Paleobird; 10-21-2012, 11:55 AM.

        Comment


        • I'm sorry that he's struggling (and you too). But, I find it's often helpful for something to have a name, because then at least you know what is going on.

          It's probably a good idea to get a care plan sorted for him going forward so that you aren't the sole provider for him.

          You're still going to be his primary carer, but you're going to need help. It's ok to get help. It was hard for me to learn this one when DS was born. You really want to be there for this person, and at this point, they *really* need you.

          But what is necessary for you to be able to really be there, is for you to be able to take care of yourself first. My doctor recommended at least 2 hrs of outdoor time (which you could do with your dad, too) just to have that calming effect of being otuside, nature, sunlight and good stuff on that end. we also discovered that I needed at least an hour of time to myself, and being a physical person, I needed that time to be physical.

          The same is true today. DS and I now do physical things together as our play time (parkour, swimming, etc) -- which may or may not be possible with your dad (perhaps long, slow walks or playing fetch with the dog?) -- and then I spend about 45 minutes on my own doing my yoga practice daily. It just reduces a lot of stress for me.

          This means you'll likely need to get people in to do things -- cleaning, perhaps cooking (consider a personal chef who might do paleo, perhaps call the local crossfit box to find someone?), and some time where another carer will be with your dad if he needs that level of someone watching out for him.

          I'm thinking of you and your dad every day; this is not the easiest time, but in the end, you will long-feel the rewards of your care and time with your dad.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by zoebird View Post
            I'm sorry that he's struggling (and you too). But, I find it's often helpful for something to have a name, because then at least you know what is going on.

            It's probably a good idea to get a care plan sorted for him going forward so that you aren't the sole provider for him.

            You're still going to be his primary carer, but you're going to need help. It's ok to get help. It was hard for me to learn this one when DS was born. You really want to be there for this person, and at this point, they *really* need you.

            But what is necessary for you to be able to really be there, is for you to be able to take care of yourself first. My doctor recommended at least 2 hrs of outdoor time (which you could do with your dad, too) just to have that calming effect of being otuside, nature, sunlight and good stuff on that end. we also discovered that I needed at least an hour of time to myself, and being a physical person, I needed that time to be physical.

            The same is true today. DS and I now do physical things together as our play time (parkour, swimming, etc) -- which may or may not be possible with your dad (perhaps long, slow walks or playing fetch with the dog?) -- and then I spend about 45 minutes on my own doing my yoga practice daily. It just reduces a lot of stress for me.

            This means you'll likely need to get people in to do things -- cleaning, perhaps cooking (consider a personal chef who might do paleo, perhaps call the local crossfit box to find someone?), and some time where another carer will be with your dad if he needs that level of someone watching out for him.

            I'm thinking of you and your dad every day; this is not the easiest time, but in the end, you will long-feel the rewards of your care and time with your dad.
            Thanks Zoe

            Yes, I know that I need some help. Right now I am in a kind of limbo state because things have been changing so quickly with my Dad's state of mind that I'm sort of waiting until some sort of 'baseline" can be established so that we can know how much care he needs. A couple of weeks ago I would have said that it would be perfectly OK to leave him on his own for a few hours while i went and did stuff like marketing or took a walk. Then i leave to go to my house (gone maybe 5-10 minutes) and I come back to find my Dad barefoot and sans walker trying to head out the front gate to go get the mail (It's a long steep driveway. He would have pitched head first straight down it.)

            I have come to an arrangement with my housekeeper who has also done nanny and elder care work to come in once a week. As soon as Betorq leaves next week, she is going to do one last cleaning of my house and then I will really "move in" down here at Dad's. Then we can get on the weekly schedule. Right now I'm kind of in transition between the two with a few bits and pieces of clothing etc. down here. Betorq has his stuff all over the place at my house and I can't find anything right now. No only that but my house is going to reek of fermented garlic and pickle juice for months after he leaves. Something to remember him by.

            Comment


            • Heh. at least you'll have all kinds of good fermented stuff around the house.

              Comment


              • Sending love and hugs (and scented candles?). My thoughts are with you and your dad.
                I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

                Comment


                • Thanks PB for taking time to reply in light of your dad's situation. I can relate. Not too long ago I sat at my dad's bedside ( we had home hospice) as we waited for his potassium to rise far enough for him to slowly fade into sleep. He had renal failure due to multiple myeloma. It was insanely hard for me as a critical care nurse so accustomed to fixing people. It was a hard time but it brought so much wisdom and understanding in the end. I hope you find the peace and acceptance I did. It is a hard path, and a lonely one even when you are surrounded by people.

                  Comment


                  • Arohanui, PB. Thinking of you and checking in here often.
                    Started Feb 18 2011

                    Tried basic primal and almost everything else in pursuit of IBS control, mood stability, and weight loss.

                    Journalling here

                    Comment


                    • Robin, you darling wee thing. Your Dad will be so proud of you - he won't always be able to voice his feelings, but the familiarity, the routine, the love that you are sharing with him, is the most wonderful gift that you can do for him.
                      And you will remember this time with fondness, joy, sadness and love (I am crying right now - for you), because he allowed you to share it with him, if this makes sense. Sorry I am waffling, but am sending huge hugs from over here in NZ
                      and a couple for Betorg too !!! if a mostly happily married gwamma is allowed to do that ???????????

                      Tracy x
                      "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

                      ...small steps....

                      Comment


                      • Hang in there, Robin. I'm sure your Dad feels the love around him, and can understand and appreciate your excellent care, even if he doesn't always fully comprehend what's going on. I hope that can be a comfort for you both.

                        Hugs and encouragement from the other side of the world.
                        I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best.

                        Oscar Wilde

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by zoebird View Post
                          Heh. at least you'll have all kinds of good fermented stuff around the house.
                          Heaps of it.

                          Originally posted by badgergirl View Post
                          Sending love and hugs (and scented candles?). My thoughts are with you and your dad.
                          I appreciate the love and hugs but send more scented candles. I like garlic. I use a lot of it in my cooking. But when it ferments it's like a garlic factory just exploded in the house.

                          Originally posted by Snauzoo View Post
                          Thanks PB for taking time to reply in light of your dad's situation. I can relate. Not too long ago I sat at my dad's bedside ( we had home hospice) as we waited for his potassium to rise far enough for him to slowly fade into sleep. He had renal failure due to multiple myeloma. It was insanely hard for me as a critical care nurse so accustomed to fixing people. It was a hard time but it brought so much wisdom and understanding in the end. I hope you find the peace and acceptance I did. It is a hard path, and a lonely one even when you are surrounded by people.
                          Thanks you. It is hard to want to just "make it all better" but the reality is that it is going to get slowly worse and then end. It's frustrating, especially trying to help him with the mental confusion. Physical pain I can do something about.

                          Originally posted by Jac View Post
                          Arohanui, PB. Thinking of you and checking in here often.
                          Thank You Jac. You are a dear. What can you tell me about digoxin? Is it really necessary do you think?

                          Originally posted by NZ primal Gwamma View Post
                          Robin, you darling wee thing. Your Dad will be so proud of you - he won't always be able to voice his feelings, but the familiarity, the routine, the love that you are sharing with him, is the most wonderful gift that you can do for him.
                          And you will remember this time with fondness, joy, sadness and love (I am crying right now - for you), because he allowed you to share it with him, if this makes sense. Sorry I am waffling, but am sending huge hugs from over here in NZ
                          and a couple for Betorg too !!! if a mostly happily married gwamma is allowed to do that ???????????

                          Tracy x
                          Thank you Tracy. Betorq headed home yesterday so you will have to send those hugs a bit farther north to Marin where he lives.

                          Originally posted by Sigi View Post
                          Hang in there, Robin. I'm sure your Dad feels the love around him, and can understand and appreciate your excellent care, even if he doesn't always fully comprehend what's going on. I hope that can be a comfort for you both.

                          Hugs and encouragement from the other side of the world.
                          Aw, Sigi. Now you've gone and made me get all snuffly.

                          Sometimes Dad is his normal old dry humored self but more and more it is like dealing with an adult sized child. The sundowning keeps starting earlier and earlier each day (around noon lately).

                          He doesn't know where the bathroom is in the house that he built and had lived in continuously for 60 years. Yeah. That bad.

                          Comment


                          • Digoxin? It's pretty good stuff for helping his heart to beat more effectively. It also has some major issues for the elderly - it takes longer to metabolise, so there is a risk of toxicity. This is a good site that gives you numbers to look for in dosage and blood levels. As always, it's a balancing act.
                            Started Feb 18 2011

                            Tried basic primal and almost everything else in pursuit of IBS control, mood stability, and weight loss.

                            Journalling here

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Jac View Post
                              Digoxin? It's pretty good stuff for helping his heart to beat more effectively. It also has some major issues for the elderly - it takes longer to metabolise, so there is a risk of toxicity. This is a good site that gives you numbers to look for in dosage and blood levels. As always, it's a balancing act.
                              Thank you Jac. It just seemed like, in the hospital, they were throwing every pill in sight at him and hoping something would work. They have taken him off the BP med (lisinopril) because, once he got back on my primal cooking and out of all the stress of the hospital environment, his BP started going way too low. Sometimes I think the doctors are just throwing darts at a board and hoping to get it right.
                              Last edited by Paleobird; 10-24-2012, 02:01 PM.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                                Sometimes I think the doctors are just throwing darts at a board and hoping to get it right.
                                The shotgun approach - yeah. I think they also assume that someone of your Dad's age must have heaps of medical problems, so they try to medicate everything they see instead of figuring out what causes some of the symptoms. If you take stress and terrible food out of the equation, get the person to where they're happiest, include some movement and really nourishing food, lots of the 'symptoms' magically vanish.
                                Started Feb 18 2011

                                Tried basic primal and almost everything else in pursuit of IBS control, mood stability, and weight loss.

                                Journalling here

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