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  • Ten days during snowstorms once, ten days after 130mph winds the second time. I'm in Western Washington. Short outages are no big deal but those long ones are killer.
    Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt.

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    • We live in the boondocks in Utah, our power is supplied by "Rocky Mountain Power(less)". We have a generator, and our house is wired so we can switch the power box from Rocky Mountain Powerless to the generator, which will power everything in the house. The longest we've been without power was 8 days one winter. I wanted hubby to plug the Christmas lights into the generator, too, but he thought that would be upsetting to our neighbors...

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      • I think it really would be easier in a serious emergency to be self sufficient living out in the sticks as opposed to a metro area. Out there you could go hunting or fishing if you needed to plus get fruits/plants for the picking and you are much more likely to have a potable water supply even if it's a stream or melting some snow.

        When the power goes out here in what would be a dessert without water being pumped in from the Colorado river and the NorCal delta, the water pumps shut down and we are stuck. Water is really the limiting factor.

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        • Originally posted by Goldie View Post
          We live in the boondocks in Utah, our power is supplied by "Rocky Mountain Power(less)". We have a generator, and our house is wired so we can switch the power box from Rocky Mountain Powerless to the generator, which will power everything in the house. The longest we've been without power was 8 days one winter. I wanted hubby to plug the Christmas lights into the generator, too, but he thought that would be upsetting to our neighbors...
          We live in the sticks of Appalachian Ohio, and our power goes out a lot. Most folks have an outdoor furnace, wood burner, etc, and are used to nights without power. The Amish around here make a lifestyle of it (we could learn a lot from them in some areas of life). Alas, we have an all-electric house so we bought a whole-house generator and had it professionally wired in at the utility pole down the driveway. Our propane cow has enough gas to power the whole house - furnace, stove, washer-dryer, all of it - for two weeks and more, depending on how wasteful we get. Hubby works from home most of of the time, and we cannot afford to say to his meeting members "sorry, but I can't participate because we lost power AGAIN"...

          Our longest was an 8-plus stretch a couple of years ago. The neighbors around here don't mind what you do, because we all live so far apart that we can't, in most cases, physically see each other! Anyway, I have brownie points with the neighbors because I took in their frozen goods during that long powerless stretch as my freezer was still running. They help me out on other ways, like coming over to grade our dirt-and-gravel drive and clear ice and snow with their big 'ole John Deeres.
          I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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          • Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
            I think it really would be easier in a serious emergency to be self sufficient living out in the sticks as opposed to a metro area. Out there you could go hunting or fishing if you needed to plus get fruits/plants for the picking and you are much more likely to have a potable water supply even if it's a stream or melting some snow.

            When the power goes out here in what would be a dessert without water being pumped in from the Colorado river and the NorCal delta, the water pumps shut down and we are stuck. Water is really the limiting factor.
            Paleobird, I was thinking of this, and I think you ought to lay up a few of those 5-gal water-cooler bottles for emergencies. Whatever you might think of the Latter-day Saints, they are spot-on in saying everybody really should have at least a minor emergency store. And with SoCal being waterless, you should start there. Don't store the 1-gal jugs from the grocery - they leak after a short while. And calculate Wolf Cub, too.
            I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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            • I'm sorry to hear about the power outages--so inconvenient!

              Thanks for the advice on the two meals a day, I'm trying it for the first time today and I'm sure I'll journal about how it goes.

              Have a great day, I hope circumstances improve out there!
              I feed my healthy cells and starve the rest.

              Waist circumference:
              50(start)/40.5(current)/35>(goal)

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              • Every fall we get ready for storms by making sure we have bottled water, fuel for the generator, foodstuffs, etc JUST IN CASE. If we don't use it, fine, but if we need it we are ready.

                Eating once or twice a day is so much easier than constantly thinking about what to nibble on every couple of hours, or even where to stop for lunch.

                Sorry for kidnapping your journal, PB.
                Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt.

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                • Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
                  Paleobird, I was thinking of this, and I think you ought to lay up a few of those 5-gal water-cooler bottles for emergencies.
                  Oh, yes, I always have kept a stash of water. I also have a big water container (7 gallon I think) that has a reverse osmosis filter in the spout so I can make any water potable and a supply of camping iodine tablets.

                  Originally posted by IronGirl View Post
                  Thanks for the advice on the two meals a day, I'm trying it for the first time today and I'm sure I'll journal about how it goes.
                  Good. It really helped me. I hope it works for you.

                  Originally posted by honeybuns View Post
                  Every fall we get ready for storms by making sure we have bottled water, fuel for the generator, foodstuffs, etc JUST IN CASE. If we don't use it, fine, but if we need it we are ready.

                  Eating once or twice a day is so much easier than constantly thinking about what to nibble on every couple of hours, or even where to stop for lunch.
                  I know you didn't mean it this way but I was just thinking that eating less often would also make it easier to get through a disaster situation. You could have a can of sardines and a chunk of cheese or some pemmican and be good to go for a whole day. I always keep a stash of USWellness Meats pemmican around. The ultimate survival food.

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                  • Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                    I know you didn't mean it this way but I was just thinking that eating less often would also make it easier to get through a disaster situation. You could have a can of sardines and a chunk of cheese or some pemmican and be good to go for a whole day. I always keep a stash of USWellness Meats pemmican around. The ultimate survival food.
                    Oh, I hadn't thought of it that way. You are totally right! Smart woman. Have you ever watched people stock up at a grocery store before a big storm? Toilet paper, cold cereal, pop and potato chips. Really.
                    Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt.

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                    • Originally posted by honeybuns View Post
                      Oh, I hadn't thought of it that way. You are totally right! Smart woman. Have you ever watched people stock up at a grocery store before a big storm? Toilet paper, cold cereal, pop and potato chips. Really.
                      I normally see the "french toast" runs. Bread, eggs, and milk.

                      We're in Texas. What are they going to do with the milk if the electricity goes out?
                      Most people don't realize how much energy it takes for me to pretend to be normal.

                      If I wanted to listen to an asshole, I'd fart.

                      Twibble's Twibbly Wibbly

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                      • Another thing I always keep a supply of is vinegar. If the power is out long enough that things start defrosting from the freezer, I can start slicing meat and making biltong the S. African way with the vinegar cure then sun dried. It would be a shame for all that lovely grass fed meat to go to waste.

                        In other news.......I went to the title company today and got all the relevant documents for the house sale signed, notarized, and made official. They needed to see a copy of my trust, my driver's license, etc. Basically I had to prove to them that I am who I say I am and that I actually do own said property.

                        That's one more thing to check off the list. Things are moving forward. Now all I have to do is sit back and wait for my buyers to sell their home. Their listing officially hits the market Monday. With interest rates still so low but the economy starting to pick up, people are jumping at available properties. The way I have heard it from several real estate people is that there just isn't much "inventory" on the market so people are grabbing at whatever come available. I don't think they will have much trouble selling their place. It is right near the beach. The only reason they like mine better is because it would give their large family more space.

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                        • I'm pretty pathetic as to emergency preparedness, I have to admit. When Isaac was coming ashore, I did fill up a lot of vessels with about three days worth of water and the car was ready to depart, but unless I have warning, I'd have to rely on the kindness of strangers (IOW I'm shit outta luck). When Isaac did come ashore, all the neighbors with outdoor grills had them at the ready for those in need. My whole neighborhood lost power for two days (some for almost a week) except for a two block stretch, which I luckily was on. The nine units on Cox were without internet, but the very nice couple who were on AT&T didn't lose their connection and they gave us all their password for wireless, so all was well.

                          Paleobird, I'm hearing the same thing about real estate right now. I'll probably kick myself later for not jumping into a duplex, but I'm so enjoying the carefree life of a renter. Glad to hear all is going well with you.
                          "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                          B*tch-lite

                          Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                          • The problem about earthquakes (the disaster of choice where I live) is that there is never going to be any warning.

                            All the real estate people keep trying to talk me into buying a condo instead of renting one but I just don't want the hassle. Plus, by the time you pay HOA dues, property tax, and maintenance costs, you may as well be paying rent.

                            I am having a party tonight. The monthly Dame Night meeting at my house. Since this will probably be the last party I will ever have here, I am doing it up right.

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                            • Way back five years ago when I was in the depths of cancer and all the physical and emotional rot that goes with it, I was really thinking about offing myself.

                              First of all, this is not normal for me. I do not have a depressive personality or any history of mental illness. This was a logical decision making process that came from not being willing to fight bravely for something that was a lost cause.

                              I really had to back my oncologist up against a wall verbally and get him to give me a straight answer. Are we talking about "managing" my condition and perhaps "extending" my lifespan a bit with the same inevitable ending or are we talking about *curing* this bugger. Are we talking about having a post-cancer life?

                              When he told me that yes, while it was not guaranteed, it was entirely possible for this to be a cure with a cancer free future, then I shelved my plans for taking the early exit stage left.

                              While I had been at that really low point and considering my options however, I had, as I always do, thought things out very carefully. I had researched just how much of my phenobarbitol I would need combined with alcohol to go permanently nite nite.

                              And not just any alcohol. I figured, if I was going to do this, I was going to do it right. I bought a really nice bottle of tequila, the kind you can only find a specialty import store, the ones they keep in the locked cabinet, not out on the shelves.

                              That bottle of tequila has been sitting there on a shelf for five years.

                              Having gotten the all clear from my now former oncologist (Yay for no longer having an oncologist!) recently, I felt that it was time to put that bottle to a better use. So I dusted it off and cracked it open for my friends at Game Night Saturday. Oh that was yummy.

                              Interestingly enough, I didn't get one bit of a hangover, even though I did imbibe quite a bit. I think I may have a reaction to red wine (perhaps the sulphates?) that gives me such a yucky feeling the next day even after one or two glasses, hardly enough for a buzz.

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                              • Yay for using good tequila in a way that doesn't kill ya!
                                Most people don't realize how much energy it takes for me to pretend to be normal.

                                If I wanted to listen to an asshole, I'd fart.

                                Twibble's Twibbly Wibbly

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