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  • Another good day on the 21DSD. I feel fantastic. Amazingly enough, when I focus on the process, not the end game, the scale moves again. [More importantly, the tape measure is moving again. I really want to fit back into my favorite around the house pants comfortably!] Crazy, huh?

    Here's my motivational article of the day:

    The health industry is not exactly a hotspot for optimism and inspiration. More often than not, the news is steeped in depressing statistics, endless studies that make little sense to the average person, and plenty of frustration.

    Yet here I am, week after week, convinced that we’re close to a gigantic leap that can change the lives of many.

    Which is why it’s hard reading stats like this: 88 percent of all people fail in their resolutions.

    It’s a frustrating concept that few have answered—why do so many people fall short of their goals? In search of an answer, I devised a quick test that might help you solve the problem.

    Take out a piece of paper and write down a list of your goals. They can be health and fitness related, they can be your resolutions from January, or maybe they’re general areas that you want to improve (like getting a promotion).

    Now create a separate list. This is everything that you believe prevents you from achieving these goals. (Seriously, you should do this. I'll wait)

    What stands out to you?

    When I created my list I was shocked by two things:

    1) My second list was long. Too long, in fact. The more roadblocks we perceive that stand in our way the more excuses we give ourselves to not succeed. Maybe your list is different, but most people have found the same thing. We limit our own success by creating reasons we can’t succeed rather than making sure that nothing will prevent us from reach our goals. That second list, which focuses on what we believe stands in our way, should be nothing. It's said that you shouldn't iimagine dreams that you don't believe can come true. That means the road to success begins by not blocking your own path.

    2) Many of my goals were “repeated” wishes that I had stated many times before. These weren’t new hopes and dreams but rather continual aspirations that I clearly had yet to satisfy.

    This was interesting and important because it appears that the concept of success is a drug that offers benefits even when you fail.

    Some psychologists have coined this term the “false hope syndrome.” That is, you continue to try the same goal—time after time—in spite of numerous failures. The phenomenon is based on the idea that feelings of control and the hope of self-improvement is so overwhelming that you can’t help but ignore the past and look forward to the future. The dream of a better life is something you can’t resist.

    You could easily call this the Charlie Brown Effect: We keep hoping that we can kick that football, even if we know that there’s a 99 percent chance it will be pulled out from underneath us at the last second. Why? Because making contact just once makes all the previous failures worth the success.

    Now is the time for you to make contact.


    blog post photo

    I’ve always said that I have a love-hate relationship with resolutions. I love the concept of setting concrete goals, writing those visions down, and working towards a better you. I hate that people only seem to make resolutions at the beginning of the year and then forget that improving yourself doesn’t occur in a vacuum. You don’t have to wait for January 1 to make a change. And you don’t have to spend the next 9 months wondering why you didn’t take action and improve yourself when you knew that you’d fallen off the tracks. Or that you ignored making changes altogether.

    Let’s change the game and move beyond New Year's resolutions. Maybe you’re on track. Maybe you’re not. And maybe you never even started because you were already happy with your health or too afraid to fail again.

    This is your life. This is your health. And you’re only given one body, so you can't take it for granted.


    People always want second and third chances. In your lifetime, you will have hundreds of opportunities to look in the mirror, say sorry to yourself, and start over again. Or see what you’ve accomplished and set new goals. But at some point, you run out of chances. Your negligence causes too many problems, too much doubt. Or your false hope leads to learned helplessness, and ultimately, you quit on yourself and your body.

    It’s time to take control of your life.

    We’re calling this month Resolution Reactivation. After all, that 88 percent needs to change. That’s failure in every society in every way. And in no way should anyone ever accept failure for anything that relates to their health and well-being.

    But this is more than Resolution Reaction. This is the end of the “false hope syndrome”—and the beginning of becoming Unstoppable. The false hope syndrome is rooted in the belief that people create unrealistic goals that inevitably lead to frustration and failure. The lofty goals create the euphoria that allows you to push to become better—but focusing only on the endpoint is what leads to failure.

    Let’s change that.

    Success is something that everyone can experience. But be honest with yourself: Your prior experiences will frame your timeline and influence how many hurdles you must clear and how long it will take for you to reach your ultimate goal. But there are plenty of small victories on the path to winning the war with your body and your health. And those small successes—even something as simple as tracking your food—will guide you to becoming better.

    Defeating failure is a test of perseverance. You must staying the path, fight, and push yourself to the belief that you can change who you are from the inside out. That’s the real secret to success. Realizing that the path to a better you starts with a constant determination and emphasis on setting goals, identifying those goals, and then focusing on the steps it takes to reach the destination.

    This is your life audit, and it’s up to you to set yourself back on track.

    Take some time today—don’t wait for tomorrow—to assess where you’re at now. Create a set of long-term goals that you want for yourself. It doesn’t have to be in health and fitness, but if that area is faltering understand that a broken body makes it harder to support a strong life.

    Here's where you change the game: Once you have a list, create PROCESS goals that will help you be successful. This is the most important part of setting up a plan that won’t end in failure and can help change the health of so many people. After all, process goals give you control over a situation—and control is what creates the pleasure sensation in your brain that helps with motivation. But unlike outcome goals (like losing 50 pounds), focusing on behaviors that are easier to sustain and are a necessary part of the journey (eat vegetables, avoid candy, exercise three times per week) helps prevent burnout.

    Believe it or not, your brain works like a muscle. And if you have too much stress on your brain (with big goals like losing a lot of weight, quitting an addictive habit, or completely changing your life), it can become mentally exhausting. Your prefrontal cortex (which is a part of your brain) controls your willpower, but it is also involved with many other mental processes. So you need to be careful not to overwhelm yourself by focusing on a goal that might be too heavy to lift. Ultimately, that massive goal combined with the other responsibilities of the prefontal cortex will leave you short on willpower and results.

    Instead, focus on the process. This will, in effect, “distract” you from the larger goal (which prevents mental fatigue), provide reinforcement when you succeed, and help you achieve your goals with less mental effort and strain. Your process goals should start small and grow only when you’re ready to take on more and have experienced success.

    We’re not here to deliver false hope or expectations, or play a part in more frustration. There are many other aspects that play a role in success, but the mind is usually the first to go. And this approach should help keep you strong. This time you’re not waiting for January. You’re not waiting for another missed opportunity. And you’re definitely not going to settle for less.

    Today is the day that you realize that you control your fate. And reactivating that belief—and keeping it in your mind—will put you on a clear path to a better life.



    - Adam Bornstein

    Read more: The Decision That Could Change Your Health | LIVESTRONG.COM
    -- Ruth

    Comment


    • Love this! Thanks

      My first thought is that part of the reason I keep repeating the same goal is that it is so important to me, and for the most part I try different ways of getting there. It is how I quit smoking. I quit so many times I cannot even being to count. In the end I had to admit that I was not quitting, just stopping. It was a daily decision, and I created new habits and stayed away from those situations which made me want one. And now after 21 years, I can actually have one and not start it backup again. That is what i use as my inspiration for my relationship with food and health and weight.

      I need to get on to making those lists.
      Chris
      "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass. It is about learning to dance in the rain."
      Unknown

      My journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread36279.html

      My "Program": doing my version of a 4:3 - 3 day fast diet with real food every day, with a little twist of anti-inflammatory mixed in.

      Comment


      • So, it's been a long time. Last week, I was basically non-functioning. I felt like I did when my PCOS when beyond terrible. Fatigue so bad I could barely get out of bed. Terrible brain fog. It was hard to work. I had to take a sick day. I was terrified... I ate super well, took time off of the gym, popped a lot of vitamins, slept a ton, and sat in the sun. By Sunday, I felt human again...just in time to travel.

        Nothing good to report on the weight front. However, I'm so thankful that the health seems to be much better. Have a dr appt next week. Trying to decide what labs I want run. Anyone have a list of things they've had run recently?
        -- Ruth

        Comment


        • Ruth, so glad you are feeling better. Maybe you were just a bit rundown from the previous travel. You sound rejuvenated! Perhaps have them check your D? hmmm not sure what else.
          Karin


          Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Calorie Counter

          What am I doing? Depends on the day.

          Comment


          • Oh my, I was wondering what happened. Maybe a Lyme disease test? Full thyroid panel? Glucose Tolerance test?
            Primal since 9/24/2010
            "Our greatest foes, and whom we must chiefly combat, are within." Miguel de Cervantes

            Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools
            MFP username: MDAPebbles67

            Comment


            • Thanks, ladies, those are all good. I'm also going to have testosterone (it may be high, as it was when I had full-on PCOS symptoms) and estrogen (I think this may be low).

              I did miss everyone and have sorta been following along with your journals
              -- Ruth

              Comment


              • Today is my Friday (taking tomorrow off to play with DH). Yay!

                I'm feeling sorry for myself today. Hate it when that happens! I need to snap out of it.

                Need to focus on one lifelong habit change at one time. I know Chris and Karin were having this discussion over in Karin's journal. I want so badly to be "there", that I think I need to change everything now so that I can be there now. Of course, that isn't really working for me.... So, need to think about my priorities of what to change first!
                -- Ruth

                Comment


                • We are impatient creatures aren't we? I think we all feel like we want it now. Taking a step back and taking it one day at a time helps to relieve the craziness. I find though I need to re-synch frequently though. Deal with just today. What is one thing today you can do and control well?
                  Karin


                  Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Calorie Counter

                  What am I doing? Depends on the day.

                  Comment


                  • I have to tell you that making my one change has really positively effected my attitude. I am focusing on taking my supplements and medication as I am supposed to, I am notoriously bad at this. I have set up a system to ensure that I do this morning and night and it is working. It is also keeping me on track with the other habits I had supposedly already gotten ingrained. My weight was slowly going up and was up 10 pounds in the past few weeks, but in the 3 days I have been doing this (I had to do a start over) I have lost back 2.6 pounds, and it is TTOM!

                    So, obviously my suggestion is going to be to pick the very easiest one, or part of one, that you know with near 100% confidence that you can sustain for the next 14 days. Then fight the urge to try to do all of them! That is definitely the hardest part!
                    Chris
                    "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass. It is about learning to dance in the rain."
                    Unknown

                    My journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread36279.html

                    My "Program": doing my version of a 4:3 - 3 day fast diet with real food every day, with a little twist of anti-inflammatory mixed in.

                    Comment


                    • I'm working on changing my "mind" using Dean Dwyer's new book. It's tough though. Now that I've got my food in line, I have two basic causes of bingeing. Hormones and emotions. When they work together, I'm in trouble.
                      Primal since 9/24/2010
                      "Our greatest foes, and whom we must chiefly combat, are within." Miguel de Cervantes

                      Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools
                      MFP username: MDAPebbles67

                      Comment


                      • Mind word is the hardest thing! I'm attempting to work on it as well (as I sit here mentally craving some sunbutter or something...though I'm pleasantly full from breakfast).

                        I'm plum tired today. We are working out with the trainer and then a friend of ours is driving in from TX and will spend the night. I'm excited for him to visit us, but it means a late dinner (and I prefer to eat earlier!). The things we do for friends.

                        My bestest friend (all the way from high school) is in town this weekend visiting her sister. I'm totally excited to see her as well. It should be a great weekend!!!
                        -- Ruth

                        Comment


                        • mmmmm sunbutter!!

                          Have an awesome weekend.. sounds like your on your way
                          Karin


                          Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Calorie Counter

                          What am I doing? Depends on the day.

                          Comment


                          • Have fun!
                            Primal since 9/24/2010
                            "Our greatest foes, and whom we must chiefly combat, are within." Miguel de Cervantes

                            Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools
                            MFP username: MDAPebbles67

                            Comment


                            • One of my favorite thing to do is to have friends over to our house! Have a great weekend.
                              Chris
                              "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass. It is about learning to dance in the rain."
                              Unknown

                              My journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread36279.html

                              My "Program": doing my version of a 4:3 - 3 day fast diet with real food every day, with a little twist of anti-inflammatory mixed in.

                              Comment


                              • I hesitate to write today, because, well, things are NOT going so well. But, this is a journal and I hope to (soon) come back out on the other side...and it will be nice then to have recorded what happens along the way.

                                I'm officially up over 11 pounds. 8 of those pounds came this week. Ordinarily, I'd say that's not possible given the way/how much I eat. Unfortunately, everything I've been experiencing recently happened in the past...and it was bad news to say the least. I'm almost certain at this point that my PCOS has returned. How or why, I have no clue. The extreme fatigue. The acne that won't go away. The very sudden (and real -- NOTHING fits -- and, I had just given away my bigger clothes, since I've maintained at this weight (+/- 5) for 6 months) weight loss. It happened years ago. I'm scared. I'm upset. Actually, I'm terrified. The weight really piled on last time, even with watching what I was eating and working out. Ironically -- this is about the weight I was when things went haywire last time.

                                I feel powerless. I feel out of control. If eating paleo/primal, watching fairly closely the macros, etc. does not work, then what am I supposed to do? I feel like my body has betrayed me.

                                Of course, now I'm eating better than last time this happened (primal vs weight watchers). And, now I know what the *likely* culprit is. It won't take me years to find someone who believes I have a problem. I saw a doctor and she took my complaints seriously. Had a ton of blood work done yesterday. I know this is terrible, but I really hope that the PCOS symptoms show up...because then I have an answer and can decide how I'm going to treat it. Just wish it didn't take around 2 weeks for the results to come in. Argh. And, I travel for 7 straight days next week.

                                I feel bad about this post...but, I'm still somewhat optimistic that things will turn around. I'm trying hard to continue to eat well. I'm doing my best to sleep well. I'm still LHT 2x/week. Soon I hope to have a better post!
                                -- Ruth

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