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New kind of eating....for an athlete too!?

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  • #16
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    The 100 I ran was in September...Superior Sawtooth 100. Unfortunately had to drop out at 62 miles due to my toes and feet being battered so badly by all the rocks and roots. Running muscles and stomach felt wonderful at that point, no issues whatsoever.


    Ultras are definitely far more primal than marathon running. In a marathon (assuming somebody is running it to their optimal ability) a runner is riding that line of going over to burning almost exclusively 100% glycogen. It is in that 80-90% of max HR depending on the athlete. This is the zone that causes much more inflammation within the body. Unfortunately a majority of marathon runners also train in this zone on a daily basis. As Mark mentions, cardio work should be done at a HR less than or equal to 70% of your max HR. Many people are not capable of running at any speed without exceeding this, thus the emphasis on walking. Well trained runners can run for very long periods under 70% of max HR. Heck, I can run at 8:00/mile under 70% max HR. Most people doing a 100 miler are well below that 70% mark for a vast majority of the race.


    Good luck on your race, let me know how it turns out!

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    • #17
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      Get Primal, it's good to hear this. I've spent a lot of years running. Now I'm recovering from an injury and discovering that I can stay in shape while not running, but I'd like to be able to pick it back up once in a while--it's a good way to see the world you live in.


      Daughter of Grok, I hope you write a race report.

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