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So much contradiction for endurance runners...

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  • #16
    It's because strength training very systematically stresses and fatigues all of the muscle fiber types. It doesn't just skip ahead to the "fast twitch" and call it a day. Moving against heavy resistance and achieving deep fatigue is going to involve them all.

    The "logical" conclusion people draw is that "big" fast-twitch muscles will get in the way of endurance stuff.

    In a limited sense, that is true...one only has so much recovery in the tank. If performing objectively well at a marathon is one's goal, then one has to put in a lot of practice and acclimatizing to that kind of event. That's going to take a toll on the ability to grow muscle mass.

    On the other hand, people also vastly over-estimate just how much muscle they will actually grow. It's not like someone is going to roll out of bed one day and be swollen to the degree that's unattractive and compromising to recreational running. It's a long-term incremental fight to put on muscle under the best of circumstances.

    Assuming someone is basically average with respect to recovery and muscle growth and assuming steroids aren't involved, for all practical purposes, there is no such thing as too much muscle.

    Just consider how many young men are in a gym desperate trying to get all huge, eating like pigs, and yet they still look unremarkable.

    Apply that premise to women and people into middle age, and you can see that clawing your way to improved strength will not get you anywhere near too strong, too big, or compromised in athletics. It can only help. It WILL only help.
    Last edited by brittney_bodine; 03-04-2014, 11:44 AM.

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    • #17
      I'm not schizophrenic. I was answering someone's question before they edited.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by brittney_bodine View Post
        I'm not schizophrenic. I was answering someone's question before they edited.
        As the other side to your personality, i can vouch for that.

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        • #19
          Jerry, could you please expand on this? I'd say that this is about right for distance runners.

          Thanks.

          "What mark describes is something very few runners actually put in to practise, and it's said that 80% of weekly mileage should be easy. It's an outdated method of training, which might explain why he was such a self proclaimed wreck when he retired."

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Scooter View Post
            Jerry, could you please expand on this? I'd say that this is about right for distance runners.

            Thanks.

            "What mark describes is something very few runners actually put in to practise, and it's said that 80% of weekly mileage should be easy. It's an outdated method of training, which might explain why he was such a self proclaimed wreck when he retired."
            Ok, the first sentence is what I actually meant. I just didn't make the two points clear enough. My bad!
            The second sentence was a comment on what I assume, based on mark's description, his training would have looked like, which would be a lot of threshold/medium to high intensity training as the only way to see progression to be competitive as an endurance athlete. The old 'if you want to run faster, run faster more'. What I meant by that was obviously the harder you train, the more exhausted you feel when you don't let up on the intensity and in the case of professional athletes, that's everyday of the week. Coupled with his ben and jerry's a day habit he had, and all round poor diet, he wasn't giving his body any chance of recovery.

            Hope that makes a little more sense!

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