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  • Bodyweight exercises.

    I was thinking of doing 5 sets to failure, but was looking for some opinions? Also, I do not have access for the time being to a bar for pull ups, so any suggestions for pull up alternatives?

    Currently I am doing press/push ups, squats/lunges and planks.

    Thanks for reading!

  • #2
    when i'm on a bodyweight workout kick, i like to do 5 sets of each exercise to failure.

    just found this site recently: Madbarz.com click on routines. enjoy

    you could find a tree branch or a playground to do pullups
    Last edited by not on the rug; 03-14-2013, 04:57 AM.

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    • #3
      you could try supine pull-ups if you are by a kitchen table, that will be somewhat similar to regular pull-ups without a bar.
      http://nickburgraff.com/

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      • #4
        you should probably go for 1-less-than failure for each set, which you should be able to feel, for best results. and establish a cut off number where you start over and make each movement more difficult.

        +1 on a tree branch. plus, doorway pull up bars are cheap, small, and easy to set up.
        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

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        • #5
          Check this out. Al has this suject well covered

          Al Kavadlo – We're Working Out! | We're Working Out!
          Caution! My replies may contain traces of nuts!. My posts are just my opinion based on my experience with the primal way of life, there is no assurance it will work with others in the same way.

          Started Primal 15th October 2012
          Height 5'9"
          Start weight 200lb
          Loss so far 33.8lbs, now 166.2lb
          Goal was 168lb's

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          • #6
            What are your goals? Even with bodyweight programs, you can focus on strength, or endurance, or whatever else.

            If you want strength, keep finding more difficult exercises to do.
            If you want to do more, then do lots of sets that feel really easy. Don't go to failure except when you are testing yourself, once a month or so.

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            • #7
              I just went to the Madbarz site and all i can say is thank you.
              Today is a new day. You will get out of it just what you put into it. If you have made mistakes, there is always another chance for you. And supposing you have tried and failed again and again, you may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing we call 'Failure' is not the falling down, but the staying down.

              Mary Pickford

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              • #8
                I enjoy full body workouts. I will choose a squat variation and an upper body movement and do each for 10 min a piece at maximum intensity for as many reps as possible with shortest amounts of break.

                For example, a typical 20minute full body workout is:

                10 minutes of jump squats. When I do the reps to failure, I switch to regular squats and continue to burn it out. Once I fail with those, I will rest as little as possible, and start up again with jump squats (scoring only 1-3 reps), then again switch to bodyweight squats and burn it out. This is extremely difficult, and leads to high lactate build up. Needless to say, your legs will be sore if you push yourself to the absolute maximum.

                Then I'll catch my breath for 2.5 minutes before I workout my upper body. I'll can choose between pushups, pullups, dips with bars or with feet elevated, whatever works for you since you are limited to equipment. I'd advise push ups or handstands, even hand stand pushups or planches if you have the strength, in your case. Most bodyweight movements will recruit a lot of muscle groups, even if they focus mainly on specific areas. I really like muscle ups, but as you stated, you don't have a bar.

                Proceed to 10min of maximum pushups. Again, max out on your first set with as many reps as possible. Once you fail, lie on the ground for a brief, couple seconds. Push it up again, maybe get 3-5 reps then fail. Keep doing this for ten minutes, and I promise you will be sore for a few days if you keep the intensity at a maximum.

                I find this style of training really works on the explosiveness of my muscles, and also really helps my cardiovascular strength. The first set where you burn out from AMRAP, your ATP-PCr system is cranking hard, so your body is being trained to resynthesize ATP quickly with phosphocreatine. Once you endure the first few minutes, you'll be in an anaerobic state, and you'll feel the lactate burning in your muscles. By the time you're done with the first five minutes of your workout, you're using oxygen to aid in ATP synthesis. All of your energy systems are recruited with this style of training, so I view it as a more encompassing style of working out.

                It's really easy to get access to a pullup bar though. You can get the doorframe ones for around $25 (I got mine free from a friend). I am in a new house for this year at college, and my only pullup bar option was to hang rope from a truss in a back room and tie in a 1.25in wooden dowel with butterfly knots.

                Hope this works for you, remember to log your training data, so you can mark improvements. You want to break your record each time.
                Last edited by DeltaCypher0; 09-14-2013, 09:56 PM.

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                • #9
                  Substitutes for a pull up bar

                  1. ring rows with gymnastics rings or TRX straps
                  2. tree branch
                  3. playground
                  4. but really, just buy a cheapo door pull up bar

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DeltaCypher0 View Post
                    I enjoy full body workouts. I will choose a squat variation and an upper body movement and do each for 10 min a piece at maximum intensity for as many reps as possible with shortest amounts of break.

                    For example, a typical 20minute full body workout is:

                    10 minutes of jump squats. When I do the reps to failure, I switch to regular squats and continue to burn it out. Once I fail with those, I will rest as little as possible, and start up again with jump squats (scoring only 1-3 reps), then again switch to bodyweight squats and burn it out. This is extremely difficult, and leads to high lactate build up. Needless to say, your legs will be sore if you push yourself to the absolute maximum.

                    Then I'll catch my breath for 2.5 minutes before I workout my upper body. I'll can choose between pushups, pullups, dips with bars or with feet elevated, whatever works for you since you are limited to equipment. I'd advise push ups or handstands, even hand stand pushups or planches if you have the strength, in your case. Most bodyweight movements will recruit a lot of muscle groups, even if they focus mainly on specific areas. I really like muscle ups, but as you stated, you don't have a bar.

                    Proceed to 10min of maximum pushups. Again, max out on your first set with as many reps as possible. Once you fail, lie on the ground for a brief, couple seconds. Push it up again, maybe get 3-5 reps then fail. Keep doing this for ten minutes, and I promise you will be sore for a few days if you keep the intensity at a maximum.

                    I find this style of training really works on the explosiveness of my muscles, and also really helps my cardiovascular strength. The first set where you burn out from AMRAP, your ATP-PCr system is cranking hard, so your body is being trained to resynthesize ATP quickly with phosphocreatine. Once you endure the first few minutes, you'll be in an anaerobic state, and you'll feel the lactate burning in your muscles. By the time you're done with the first five minutes of your workout, you're using oxygen to aid in ATP synthesis. All of your energy systems are recruited with this style of training, so I view it as a more encompassing style of working out.

                    It's really easy to get access to a pullup bar though. You can get the doorframe ones for around $25 (I got mine free from a friend). I am in a new house for this year at college, and my only pullup bar option was to hang rope from a truss in a back room and tie in a 1.25in wooden dowel with butterfly knots.

                    Hope this works for you, remember to log your training data, so you can mark improvements. You want to break your record each time.
                    That's pretty cool.

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                    • #11
                      High protein food and lack of exercise caused fatness and weight gain. Avoid all high protein food like meats, nuts, grains, cheese, fast foods, fried and dairy products. Eat fresh fruits, vegetables, yogurt, drink green tea, fruit juices and plenty of water. Go for walking, running, cycling, practice push ups, bench press and chair squat. It improve mood, burns fat,make strong bones and muscles, boost energy, improve heart functions and improve fitness.
                      http://befittacoma.com
                      Last edited by David07; 10-12-2013, 06:04 AM.

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