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Maffetone heart-rate exercise - best way to improve?

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  • #16
    Thank you. I am looking forward to the health benefits. I do a lot of hiking but I really only have one speed for that: full speed ahead. A walk on flats, even a power walk, doesn't get my heart rate up enough. I went for a long "run" yesterday and found enough side streets where I only had one shout out "Way to go!" I wish I was more invisible so people wouldn't provide their commentary. It's quite enjoyable this slow. It's like I can finally sort of do what I was hoping I could do a few years ago after I finished the Pacific Crest Trail. I can just head out my door for a few hours and cover a lot of distance, just choosing my path as I go. I hope someday I can do the hills and run out my door and into the mountains. Just me and my feet and a cup to dip into streams.
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by twa2w View Post
      Isn't this similiar to what Lance Armstrong did when he was recovering from cancer - lots of LSD (long slow distance). He purported rode his bike very slowly and built up the time he rode rather than the speed. Apparently he rode at a pace that most people can jog at - until he built up to multiple hours - then started adding in some interval or tempo rides.
      He seems to have done alright by this :-)
      Hi Guys new to this but I totally agree with the above here's Lance base training when he was 28,training below 150bpm.

      Game Time Workouts - Pro Athlete Training Routines, Nutrition, Fitness and Exercise Tips: Lance Armstrong's 3-Month Training Program

      Here is something else Maffetone thinks about anaerobic training

      'Most people don't really need to do anaerobic workouts.Their lives have enough stresses that stimulate the neurological,metabolic,and the muscular systems to satisfy the minimal anaerobic requirements of the body'

      Which would probably explain why my basic speed has remained even though all of my runs for the last year has been at 12-14min/mile pace

      Leo

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      • #18
        I started doing MAF runs on the treadmill last winter and did them fairly consistently for about 3.5 months. While the mileage tracker thing on the treadmill is a little off, my first 2 mile MAF splits were around 17/18 minutes (basically a less than brisk walk with some sloowww jogging). After 3.5 months, my splits on the treadmill were around 12/12.5 minutes. Out on the road this summer, I'm regularly doing runs in my zone at 9.5 min pace. Still a bit of a plodder, but improving. It definitely works if you have the patience to stick with it.

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        • #19
          Here's an update. I've been doing it for close to 3 weeks now. I'm either experiencing better weather or else I'm actually improving. I was able to run almost all the way up a few small hills without setting the beeping off. I was able to run under my max in a manner you can consider jogging, not shuffling. I could also run like this breathing through my nose. So I am definitely improving. I feel really good, too. It is giving me more energy overall. I think this has been a really good thing for me. I'm glad I have found it.
          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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          • #20
            SB, this is really interesting. Would you recommend The Big Book of Health and Fitness (seems to be Maffetone's latest release) as a comprehensive-enough reference for anyone considering this protocol? (My God, that man has written so many books!)
            I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best.

            Oscar Wilde

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Sigi View Post
              SB, this is really interesting. Would you recommend The Big Book of Health and Fitness (seems to be Maffetone's latest release) as a comprehensive-enough reference for anyone considering this protocol? (My God, that man has written so many books!)
              I thought The Big Book Of Endurance was the latest??? Whichever you get it is pretty simple stuff, just you, a HR monitor, and lots of patience.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Sigi View Post
                SB, this is really interesting. Would you recommend The Big Book of Health and Fitness (seems to be Maffetone's latest release) as a comprehensive-enough reference for anyone considering this protocol? (My God, that man has written so many books!)
                I think the Big Book of Health and Fitness has everything you would ever need to know to be your own doctor for the rest of your life. Well, to take control over your health anyway, and see a doctor only rarely. It's very general. It's kind of a compendium of all his writings. There are a couple of confusing parts in it and you can kind of see a trend if you look closely, a change in his thinking over time, mostly around fats. Where he starts out discussing fats he makes it seem like half your fats need to be stuff like soybean and corn oil. But then practically on the next page he's sharing anecdotes about making his patients remove those things from the diet and how they improved. I found that confusing and actually emailed him and he explained you should never eat soy and corn oil so I am going to print his email and store it in the book in case my boyfriend ever thumbs through it. Way in the back of the book, under brain health, he says to never eat corn and soy oil and eat lard and butter and olive oil and avocados instead.

                He's not low carb and he does recommend eating lots of small meals through the day. But he also recommends doing a carb intolerance test on yourself and if you can't tolerate them, to not eat them. He also doesn't tell you not to eat grains, but says not to eat refined grains, which most are. He favors brown over white rice. Oat groats yes, oatmeal never. He also never explains why the fat in dairy is particularly bad although he says so frequently. So basically it's not the Primal Blueprint or Paleo diet but it hardly matters because if any general person ate that way, they'd improve their health just as well as the paleo diet.

                The part about the heart rate exercise is just a chapter or so and he says if all you ever did was walk that would put you ahead of the game. He does explain the whole MAF thing and how to do it. He also says that the low heartrate stuff helps convert the body to fat-burning mode, and he talks about the benefits of that for endurance athletics. So there is cross-over for sure, but the audience is probably different from the one targeted by the endurance running book.

                Originally posted by PureFunctionalFitness View Post
                I thought The Big Book Of Endurance was the latest??? Whichever you get it is pretty simple stuff, just you, a HR monitor, and lots of patience.
                I think he says on his website somewhere that both Big Books are the latest. I think the H & F one is targeted to general health throughout your life with a little more variety of topics, including a few that are a little hippie-dippie, which is fine with me. He does live in the desert after all.
                Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                • #23
                  The Endurance one has a chapter on carb intolerance and a two week test. There is a fair bit of health stuff, but it is really targeted at the use of low HR training for endurance 'athletes', for anyone who wants to work at the right intensity for health and vitality really. If you are just interested in the HR stuff, Maffetone's site, or G search for an article by Mark Allen, who used a lot of this stuff for much of his Ironman success

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                  • #24
                    I suspect you don't really have to buy either book. You could google search for it all. Much of the book I have is on his website. I bought the book to have lying around in hopes my boyfriend might pick it up someday. He is against eating real food (all that fat, nooo! pasta and oatmeal are hearthealthy!) and would find the whole diet book tone of the PB off-putting, as I do, too. But Maffetone's book is more matter-of-fact.
                    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                    • #25
                      Thanks for the feedback, peeps!
                      I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best.

                      Oscar Wilde

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                      • #26
                        sbhikes, thanks for starting this thread. Exercise is an area of primal which has eluded me...
                        The Maffetone method of building your aerobic base, resonated for me.
                        This foundation should click in the exercise/strength aspect of primal.

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                        • #27
                          Hi all,
                          pretty old thread but interesting!
                          Since I have noticed some of the sign of stage 1 sbhikes quoted from the book (I have bought it recently) I want to start doing my exercises within the heart rate threshold by Maffetone.
                          Do you still do some hiit?
                          As I get it right from the book, he says that working out with weights is anaerobic??
                          Does this matter? Anearobic shouldbe avoided?
                          g.
                          I hope, someone can give advice and returns to this thread.

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                          • #28
                            I really enjoyed the Maffetone method. I did fall off the wagon due to an unrelated injury for a while, but during the two weeks I spent on it I was able to go from basically just walking quickly to running a bit of a distance without the machine beeping on me. It works.

                            But based on what I've been reading, it might be a good thing to have a sprint day as well every now and then. No more than once a week or you'll be sacrificing the aerobic exercise, but it's nice to just have fun and spring your toes off every now and then to keep motivation (and speed!!!) up.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by gergirl View Post
                              Hi all,
                              pretty old thread but interesting!
                              Since I have noticed some of the sign of stage 1 sbhikes quoted from the book (I have bought it recently) I want to start doing my exercises within the heart rate threshold by Maffetone.
                              Do you still do some hiit?
                              As I get it right from the book, he says that working out with weights is anaerobic??
                              Does this matter? Anearobic shouldbe avoided?
                              g.
                              I hope, someone can give advice and returns to this thread.
                              The concept is much the same as it is in primal. That is to ramp up your fat burning (aerobic) efficiency first. But no, you do not avoid anaerobic activity. You just avoid that middle of the road chronic cardio zone where you are hitting 70-80% max heart rate and holding it there for extended periods as a training method. So you do LOTS of low and slow with a couple or few short intense HIT sessions a week....those may be HIIT or weights.

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                              • #30
                                Maffetone heart-rate exercise - best way to improve?

                                Been doing the MAF thing for +4 months and have seen my MAF mile run time drop by 20% so I'm really loving this stuff and plan on keeping it up. Been years since I ran any trail races cause I was aware of the reality of chronic cardio. The MAF protocol solves this problem and I can run again! Hope to do a few trail runs this fall and a trail marathon by next fall. Thanks Phil!!!


                                Sent from my iPad using Marks Daily Apple Forum

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