Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Vegan bodybuilding successes?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vegan bodybuilding successes?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/05/sp...R_AP_LO_MST_FB

    Hey all,

    I wanted to know what you thought of this article. Though it certainly doesn't change my primal mind, I find it amazing that anyone is able to put on muscle with the paltry amounts of protein-rich foods available to a vegan. It's hard enough to do it on a meat-filled diet!

  • #2
    From the artificial he eats "tofu and plant based protein powder."
    Eating primal you can get away without any of that.
    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
    PS
    Don't forget to play!

    Comment


    • #3
      “Is it possible to be a good bodybuilder and be a vegan? Yes,” said Jose Antonio, the chief executive of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. “But is it ideal? No.”


      bingo.

      Comment


      • #4
        Actually a really good article- hits the both sides well.

        I hate bodybuilding and vegans though. They do seem to fit together- both self-righteous, pointless activities that harm you while accomplishing nothing.

        People don't like to hear it, but genetics play a bigger role in the way you look than anything else, especially in bodybuilding. Much of it is as simple as body ratios, like shoulders to hips and such, which cannot be changed barring radically unethical surgery.
        Lifting Journal

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Apex Predator View Post
          Actually a really good article- hits the both sides well.

          I hate bodybuilding and vegans though. They do seem to fit together- both self-righteous, pointless activities that harm you while accomplishing nothing.

          People don't like to hear it, but genetics play a bigger role in the way you look than anything else, especially in bodybuilding. Much of it is as simple as body ratios, like shoulders to hips and such, which cannot be changed barring radically unethical surgery.
          Amen, also, muscles respond to stress regardless of what you put down your gullet.
          I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

          Comment


          • #6
            Mike Mahler is a super strong vegan (though not bodybuilder). More power to those who can do it I suppose, but def not the ideal.
            http://facebook.com/fitmountain

            Know your limits. Then shatter them.

            Comment


            • #7
              Also spray-tans hide the nasty pallor of vegans...
              Lifting Journal

              Comment


              • #8
                vegans = more meat for me
                I like vegans
                ad astra per aspera

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Apex Predator View Post
                  I hate bodybuilding and vegans though. They do seem to fit together- both self-righteous, pointless activities that harm you while accomplishing nothing.
                  I have a problem with that statement. Anyone that exercises to build strength is by definition a "bodybuilder." I don't walk around in a ripped T-shirt with a milk gallon full of water sporting a glowing orange tan all year 'round, but I lift hard and I lift heavy and I center my workout around the big boys:

                  Deadlifts
                  Squats
                  Benchpresses
                  Shoulder Presses
                  Calf Raises
                  Weighted Chin-ups
                  Weighted Dips

                  These are the kings of heavy, stressful, complex movements, and I do it to get bigger, stronger, leaner...overall, just to improve my physique. I am Primal, so I'm clearly health-minded, I eat a lot of protein, read about it for fun and spend hours a week at the gym strictly because I love it. I am, by all definitions, a bodybuilder. A 5'7" 135lb bodybuilder. I don't think I'm particularly self-righteous, and my activities are far from pointless. Without them, I'd be an incredibly weak stick, wouldn't look half as good as I do now (and I still have lots of improvement to go!) and wouldn't be nearly as healthy.

                  Just saying. Genetics are actually overrated and everyone uses them as an excuse. The problem isn't a person's genes - it's the person. Some people may get "shredded" more easily than others but no one has genetics that keep them from getting reasonably lean to a healthy level of body fat (11-16% for a man, 20-25% for a woman).
                  Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                    I have a problem with that statement. Anyone that exercises to build strength is by definition a "bodybuilder." I don't walk around in a ripped T-shirt with a milk gallon full of water sporting a glowing orange tan all year 'round, but I lift hard and I lift heavy and I center my workout around the big boys:

                    Deadlifts
                    Squats
                    Benchpresses
                    Shoulder Presses
                    Calf Raises
                    Weighted Chin-ups
                    Weighted Dips

                    These are the kings of heavy, stressful, complex movements, and I do it to get bigger, stronger, leaner...overall, just to improve my physique. I am Primal, so I'm clearly health-minded, I eat a lot of protein, read about it for fun and spend hours a week at the gym strictly because I love it. I am, by all definitions, a bodybuilder. A 5'7" 135lb bodybuilder. I don't think I'm particularly self-righteous, and my activities are far from pointless. Without them, I'd be an incredibly weak stick, wouldn't look half as good as I do now (and I still have lots of improvement to go!) and wouldn't be nearly as healthy.

                    Just saying. Genetics are actually overrated and everyone uses them as an excuse. The problem isn't a person's genes - it's the person. Some people may get "shredded" more easily than others but no one has genetics that keep them from getting reasonably lean to a healthy level of body fat (11-16% for a man, 20-25% for a woman).
                    I was referring specifically to the act of getting into a thong in front of judges, as is referred to in the article.
                    Last edited by Apex Predator; 01-12-2012, 10:17 PM. Reason: Spelling
                    Lifting Journal

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X