Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

interval training -best source for carbs beforehand?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • interval training -best source for carbs beforehand?

    So are the majority of carbs for athletes coming from fruit and vegetables? I do some HIIT at the gym quite frequently and am pretty out of it somedays. Do I just load up on fruit about an hr before working out? I drink diluted gatorade while working out too, as I haven't found a sports drink that has enough sodium in it to replenish my body (I sweat like a mad man).

  • #2
    1. Fruit is a non ideal source of carbs. Do some research on this and fructose. Your muscles need glycogen - fructose needs to be processed by your liver before glycogen can be produced unlike the energy from potatoes, sweet potatoes and other veg. There are indications/opinions that fructose in and of itself is not a healthy thing for human consumption by some in the paleo/primal community do some googling.
    2. Gatorade -- why not water? Gatorade will hydrate you but also is basically humming bird food. If your goals are increased performance instead of weight loss or improved body composition it will help to that end; typically people are doing HIIT to lean out -- Gatorade will not help this. humans evolved kicking ass while drinking water - trust me it'll be good for you.
    3. What kind of HIIT are we talking about? You are not at risk for hyponutremia (sodium and electrolyte deficiency) from doing HIIT every day. If you are hiking the Bright Angel Trail of the Grand Canyon in 110 degree heat in direct sunlight each day you are - otherwise you definitely do not need to be chugging Gatorade to avoid dying from sodium deficiency.
    ad astra per aspera

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by TheFastCat View Post
      1. Fruit is a non ideal source of carbs. Do some research on this and fructose. Your muscles need glycogen - fructose needs to be processed by your liver before glycogen can be produced unlike the energy from potatoes, sweet potatoes and other veg. There are indications/opinions that fructose in and of itself is not a healthy thing for human consumption by some in the paleo/primal community do some googling.
      2. Gatorade -- why not water? Gatorade will hydrate you but also is basically humming bird food. If your goals are increased performance instead of weight loss or improved body composition it will help to that end; typically people are doing HIIT to lean out -- Gatorade will not help this. humans evolved kicking ass while drinking water - trust me it'll be good for you.
      3. What kind of HIIT are we talking about? You are not at risk for hyponutremia (sodium and electrolyte deficiency) from doing HIIT every day. If you are hiking the Bright Angel Trail of the Grand Canyon in 110 degree heat in direct sunlight each day you are - otherwise you definitely do not need to be chugging Gatorade to avoid dying from sodium deficiency.
      +1
      Ancestral Health Info

      I design websites and blogs for a living. If you would like a blog or website designed by someone who understands Primal, see my web page.

      Primal Blueprint Explorer My blog for people who are not into the Grok thing. Since starting the blog, I have moved close to being Archevore instead of Primal. But Mark's Daily Apple is still the best source of information about living an ancestral lifestyle.

      Comment


      • #4
        So even for ultra-marathoners, and general people who workout intensely, they should be getting all their energy from vegetables? I always hear about carbo loading (even by the best athletes) before big races (starches, pasta, etc). I just have been feeling sluggish lately working out and wonder if it is because of lack of carbs. I eat a lot of veggies throughout the day.

        ps - I do insanity interval training. All body weight exercises. It's the only infomercial style training I like because it's high intensity.

        Comment


        • #5
          Sweet potato! Or rice if you feel like your carbs are on the lower side.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Brent* View Post
            So even for ultra-marathoners, and general people who workout intensely, they should be getting all their energy from vegetables? I always hear about carbo loading (even by the best athletes) before big races (starches, pasta, etc). I just have been feeling sluggish lately working out and wonder if it is because of lack of carbs. I eat a lot of veggies throughout the day.
            I was in the same boat. What I ended up doing was feeding myself a lot of carbs right after my workout and it helped out quite a bit with my energy levels the next day.

            I use sweet potatoes or rice but no fruit or no sugary drinks. I've since stopped eating before a workout and just concentrate on eating something starchy/carby afterwards.
            Last edited by pacificBeef; 09-13-2011, 11:49 PM.
            Currently dabbling in: IF, leangains, Starting Strength, 5/3/1

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by pacificBeef View Post
              I was in the same boat. What I ended up doing was feeding myself a lot of carbs right after my workout and it helped out quite a bit with my energy levels the next day.

              I use sweet potatoes or rice but no fruit or no sugary drinks. I've since stopped eating before a workout and just concentrate on eating something starchy/carby afterwards.

              uhh...rice isn't paleo friendly I thought...

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Brent* View Post
                So are the majority of carbs for athletes coming from fruit and vegetables? I do some HIIT at the gym quite frequently and am pretty out of it somedays. Do I just load up on fruit about an hr before working out? I drink diluted gatorade while working out too, as I haven't found a sports drink that has enough sodium in it to replenish my body (I sweat like a mad man).
                Unless you are doing several hours of high-intensity training I don't think you need to worry about sodium or electrolyte balances. Just eat proper food before or after your workout and drink water while working out.

                As for the carbs, some good alternatives to fruit are white potatoes, carrots, berries, rice and milk. (Yeah, rice and milk are technically not Paleo, but neither is extensive high-intensity training...)

                Personally I just eat an apple or a banana before working out. Works fine for me. I'm not too worried about the fructose content as a single serving of fruit is a very small percentage of my total calories over the course of a day.
                Norak's Primal Journal:
                2010-07-23: ~255lbs, ~40.0"
                2011-11-03: ~230lbs, ~35.5"
                2011-12-07: ~220lbs, ~34.0"

                Comment


                • #9
                  A couple of things -

                  - It isn't the calories from fructose that are non ideal it's the way that your body has to process it in order to use it - norak I'm looking at you!
                  - Insanity, Crossfit, PX90 - you're fine with water. You're even fine doing it fasted (as long as you aren't competing for performance). Typically if you are doing these programs for fitness you might be trying to lose weight. If this is the case you want to be fasted and you don't want to be eating immediately before hand (if fat catabolism is the goal)
                  - after your workout is when your nutrition is most important. If you are doing HIIT every day you need to replace your muscle glycogen. Whole milk is very good for this as are starchy tubers.
                  - If you are doing an hour straight of HIIT (I don't know I have never done Insanity) you probably want more of all your macro nutrients protein/fat/carbs. Everyone's different play around for a couple weeks and see how you do.
                  - ultramarathoners are a whoooole different animal. You are out of the human existence zone at that point and anything goes as far as I am concerned -- entire pizzas, Gatorade, whatever. You are pushing yourself beyond human functioning and need everything you can digest to get it there as far as I am concerned. It's more about macronutrients to fuel performance than nutritionally dense, healthy foods. But that's just my take. I have heard of one female strict paleo ultra marathoner out there (a professional I believe) I am sure there are more. The things I have heard have them eating a very high percentage of calories from fat.

                  What are your fitness goals? Lose weight? gain muscle? lean out?
                  Last edited by TheFastCat; 09-14-2011, 07:12 AM.
                  ad astra per aspera

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    TheFastCat is giving great advice.

                    I've been on strict paleo for 6 months, under 30 carbs per day.

                    I started adding distance running to my routine.

                    I have no problems doing my runs (up to 7 miles so far) in complete fasted ketosis.

                    But if I fail to up my carbs AFTER my runs to replenish my glycogen stores, it's a disaster. I am a grumpy zombie for days as my body (apparently) tries to redirect every ounce of energy to replenish my glycogen.

                    After your workouts: Protien to rebuild your muscels; Starchy carbs to refill your glycogen.

                    If you are on low carb, fruit is OK post workout. Your liver stores are always the first destination for glycogen... Be it synthesized from glucose or fructose.

                    Fruit is made up of fructose and glucose. BUT... glycogen synthesized from fructose can ONLY go to the liver. Glycogen synthesized from glucose can go to the muscels OR the liver. But, the liver always gets priority.

                    You just have to be careful. If your liver is full, then any excess glycogen synthesized from the fructose will go to fat, regardless of how depleated your muscels are. If your eating foods with glucose (e.g. starchy veg), you know that you will get your liver filled, then it will replenish your muscels... THEN it will be stored as fat.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Brent* View Post
                      uhh...rice isn't paleo friendly I thought...
                      I'm not paleo, not that there is a clear definition of what that is anyway.
                      Last edited by pacificBeef; 09-14-2011, 11:24 AM.
                      Currently dabbling in: IF, leangains, Starting Strength, 5/3/1

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TheFastCat View Post
                        It isn't the calories from fructose that are non ideal it's the way that your body has to process it in order to use it - norak I'm looking at you!
                        You're saying I'll get fat if I eat a banana before my workouts? Fructose may not be ideal, but I still think apples and bananas (which is pretty much the only fruit I eat on a regular basis) contain enough good stuff to be worth eating anyway.
                        Norak's Primal Journal:
                        2010-07-23: ~255lbs, ~40.0"
                        2011-11-03: ~230lbs, ~35.5"
                        2011-12-07: ~220lbs, ~34.0"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          So all those distance runner, ultramarathoners, are you guys saying they don't need to carboload before their races? If they do carboload, are they just eating veggies?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You're saying I'll get fat if I eat a banana before my workouts?
                            If your liver glycogen is full when you eat fruit the fructose will be processed by the liver and stored as fat. If you are lifting you want muscle glycogen foremost. Starches bypass processing by the liver and go directly to your muscle glycogen. Fructose will get there eventually to if you liver glycogen has room for it. Bananas do have potassium and also more glucose than fructose which is good ; but they have a lot of total sugar which is never ideal. A banana will be a better choice nutritionally than an apple that has twice the fructose and no glucose -- additionally besides fiber there's nothing in an apple as far as I'm concerned that is helpful - the fructose in it kind of put it in the realm of a treat.

                            why am I nagging about fruit?

                            When undertaking the primal lifestyle (there might be new comers reading this thread) common thing people do is substitute fruit for their veggies because fruits are typically more convenient (no cooking) sweet tasting (sugar=yummy), people presume them to be nutrient dense and healthy and they ease their transition to the primal diet, serving as replacements to other sweet tasting things they are used to eating. Many people don't understand that fruit isn't as ideal as they have been led to believe in terms of maintaining a low blood sugar and consuming nutrient dense foods. Many people never attain a keteogenic diet (or find it much harder to) in which the majority of their energy is derived from keteogensis and gluconeogenesis of protein and fat because they eat a lot of fruit, the sugar in which inhibits or slows the bodys transition. This is pretty important for people who are attempting to lose weight, not so much for people who have already met their goals.

                            is a piece of fruit better than a snickers bar? of course.

                            So all those distance runner, ultramarathoners, are you guys saying they don't need to carboload before their races? If they do carboload, are they just eating veggies?
                            not at all- they do. But they train keteogenically (low carb) prior to competition in many cases and up their carbs for competition. I'm going to emphasize once again -- why are you eating carbs in order to do at home insanity workouts if the point of the insanity workouts is to lean out and get stronger? Carbs will help increase your performance but not lean out or grow stronger (unless your performance without them is insufficient to sustain intensity). I would argue that if your energy level currently depends on carbs you should work towards a more keteogenic diet where you don't feel the need to eat carbs in order to be energetic.

                            if you are attempting to make your high school football/basketball team -- more carbs during tryout period = good
                            if you are running the 400 meters in a track meet -- more carbs day before race day = good
                            if you are attempting to lose weight doing p90x, crossfit, Insanity -- more carbs = not gonna help
                            if you are a competitive crossfit athlete competing in a competition -- more carbs = good
                            if you are lifting heavy weights while attempting to lose weight -- more carbs = unneccessary (keteogenic/gluconeogenesis catabolism of fat is better -- no carbs required)
                            Last edited by TheFastCat; 09-15-2011, 08:05 AM.
                            ad astra per aspera

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Brent* View Post
                              So all those distance runner, ultramarathoners, are you guys saying they don't need to carboload before their races? If they do carboload, are they just eating veggies?
                              I would also add that the point of carb loading for endurence events (those lasting 2 hours or more) is that your glycogen stores most likely WILL be depleated. So, you carb load to top off your stores prior to the event. The longer the glycogen lasts, the longer your endurance.

                              However, past 90 minutes... two hours... whenever, the glycogen stores are going to be gone. At this point, your body needs to transition to burning fat. This is why some elite endurance runners train in a ketogenic state: To condition the body to make this transition quicker.

                              But, again... speaking from somewhat limited experience: Training in a ketogenic state is not the difficult part. It's RECOVERING from endurance activities in ketosis that is tough. I can do a long run, in a fasted, ketogenic state and feel great during the whole run. But if I do not carb up right after the run, my next two days are SHOT. During this time, I cannot even THINK about going back out.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X