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  • starting running barefoot

    hi guys.
    im 18, and currently i have a knee injury.
    ive been doing some workout at the advice of a sport doctor.
    he told me that in like next week or so i might be able to start running again (of course for very short time probably).
    ive asked him if i should run barefoot (never done it before) and he said that its better running barefoot.
    so im kinda wanna be ready for it and i have no idea how to start running barefoot.
    i know everyone says that u just need to take off ur shoes and u will run correctly but im scared that i wont and that i will be doing damage.
    can u guys give me some advices and maybe so videos on how to start running barefoot.

    thank you very much

  • #2
    There are a ton of videos out on the web on this. There are also a ton of posting on MDA on this subject.
    You do need to know something about the technique before you start because you can get injured.
    Start here.
    Learn how to do a search query.
    My primal journal that I don't update enough:
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread33293.html

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    • #3
      Running barefoot puts a lot more strain on your calves, so expect those to be sore for a while.
      Take it very easy for a while, as you'll need to build the muscles in both your feet and calves.

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      • #4
        Start slowly, especially if you have an injury. Check out Barefoot Ted's website and Barefoot Kenbob has a free e-book.

        I can't emphasize START SLOWLY enough. I thought I was starting slowly, but not slowly enough. I ended up with plantar faciaitis that took six months to get rid of. I feel good now and have new Luna sandals that I can't wait to try out!

        Start slowly.. run around the block. Yeah, that slowly.
        Woman, Artist, Wife, Visionary, Mother, Gardener, Daughter, Tea-drinker, Friend, Believer.

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        • #5
          Start by simply walking barefoot for short distances and see how that feels. Various surfaces may feel different so experiment with grass, carpet, asphalt, sand, etc. If this feels okay, you can then begin barefoot running. I would recommend Lee Saxby's video for drills and tips on barefoot running, a youtube search will pull that up. To start, run half barefoot and half with shoes(minimal padding being best obviously). As you make progress, you can switch towards more time unshod. As previously posted, this should be a long and slow process, don't rush as many injuries can happen.

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          • #6
            i dont wanna run with my shoes again im scared it will damage my knee, i wanna be 100% barefoot.
            i am used to being barefoot i guess, im always is in my house so that counts for somthing right?
            i saw lee saxby's video but he dont explain what to do with ur feet, he just tells to guys to take off the shoes and then that guy runs correctly by himself.
            im scared i wont.

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            • #7
              I guess to put it simply, start leaning until you feel like you're gonna fall and then take off running. Concentrate on landing on either forefoot and then touching heel or landing with your whole foot. If you can videotape yourself or have someone else do it, then that'll help you make sure you're doing everything right. Check out the Natural Running Center website and watch some of their videos and read their articles. If you going to start slow and go for short lengths of time, you will most likely avoid issues. Also don't forget, many runners are injured because of inflammation due to diet.

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              • #8
                I'm 47 and had tried taking up light jogging a couple of years ago to tweak my fitness and weight, but those early forays ended with shin splints, knee pain, and early fatigue. I studied up on Chi, Pose, and Evolution running techniques (books at Amazon, some good vids on YouTube). For me, a minimalist footwear helped end heel striking and all the listed pains. I started last year but had an injury that stopped me before I could really get going, but the one time I went barefoot I came back with bloody toes. (And I walk barefoot a lot, so it's not like they're not toughened up.)

                So for me, at least something on the foot is essential for protection, but I didn't want to spend a ton on specialized barefoot shoes. I found that water shoes (Speedo, e.g.) work great and are cheap -- I got a couple of pairs at a local retailer for $6 each. Super light weight, no heel/arch thickness, no shoestrings, just pop 'em on and go.

                Oh, and now that my first uninterrupted season of running is in its 14th week, I am up to 10K in distance and feeling great. None of the old aches or pains, losing weight, and working on speed and distance. Those old water shoes do the trick for me.

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                • #9
                  This page has great close up videos of the foot strike and some great tips for how to start. Also check out the page on biomechanics - also great videos.
                  I think if you watch the videos and read all the text - you should get it.

                  Start running barefoot on concrete. Pretend it's hard baked clay if you need to feel more grok-like. Barefoot means no minimal shoes - just your soft bare feet on the ground. Your body will immediately tell you when you are striking with your heel.
                  Take it slowly. Don't expect to start off on day one running a mile. .
                  My primal journal that I don't update enough:
                  http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread33293.html

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                  • #10
                    I love running completely barefoot, and I usually just go around my neighborhood, staying on pavement so that I am less likely to step on glass or nails or whatever. My best advice would be to START SLOW and don't take huge strides slamming your feet down. Keep your stride relatively small and maybe move your legs faster than you're used to when running. But I can't emphasize "slow" enough. Don't do anything like talk yourself into speeding up because you feel like you need to be pushing yourself more. Concentrate on your running form. It may take months, maybe even years to instinctively learn the correct form. Speed will come in time, after you've perfected your form, and built up some nice, tough callouses. If you want to try some speed work though, it's easier to try some barefoot sprints on grass or sand, assuming you know there's nothing hiding in the ground like a big piece of broken glass. The faster you go barefoot, the less your heel will touch the ground. When I sprint barefoot at full speed it feels like I'm on my toes.

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                    • #11
                      im kinda in stress but il go on my first run in like a week and il see what goes on.
                      il read some material and watch vids but i guess il basicly have to trust my body, or my legs for that matter.
                      il do maybe 5 minutes of run i guess.

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                      • #12
                        Begin Here!! The Running Barefoot

                        Gordo

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Finnegans Wake View Post
                          So for me, at least something on the foot is essential for protection, but I didn't want to spend a ton on specialized barefoot shoes. I found that water shoes (Speedo, e.g.) work great and are cheap -- I got a couple of pairs at a local retailer for $6 each. Super light weight, no heel/arch thickness, no shoestrings, just pop 'em on and go.

                          Oh, and now that my first uninterrupted season of running is in its 14th week, I am up to 10K in distance and feeling great. None of the old aches or pains, losing weight, and working on speed and distance. Those old water shoes do the trick for me.
                          Ha, you are one of the few folks who sees this as I do! Seems a lot of folks don't want to consider running or walking in anything other than the officially "cool" approved Five Fingers, even if they would likely be just as comfortable (if not more so) and save a ton of $$. I say "function over form!"

                          I bought a pair of VFFs at the beginning of the craze and while they are okay, my big toes bend toward the rest of the toes just enough that if I wear the VFFs more than a few miles, I have rubbing and pressure issues on the side of the big toes. Like you, I bought some cheap water shoes and found I actually preferred those, plus they had the advantage that I could put a pair of wool socks inside them and wear them thru a Wisconsin winter w/no problems, something I could surely not do w/the VFFs (there is no way I can fit a pair of toe socks inside mine comfortably).

                          To the original poster, if you find you need some protection on your feet, the water shoes are a great and inexpensive idea. If you live in a climate w/cold winters, they will also get you thru the winter if you wear warm socks w/them. Best wishes!

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                          • #14
                            i actually live in a place where it always hot outside so cold isnt myproblem.

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                            • #15
                              It goes without saying there is a lot of wear and tear in running. if its not 100% heeled it could inflame. Take it easy but if doesn't fair up. a few weeks of slow leg pressing will activate the muscle's and keep them strong. 9 times out of 10 the extra strength will take the pain away before getting back running

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