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  • #31
    Heavy on the protein, quality carbs, water.

    Like it was said above...you gotta eat to grow.

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    • #32
      today I had a can of tuna w/ relish and a small sweet potato

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      • #33
        Here in an interesting paper on nutrient timing. They completely blow off Fat which I think is a failure.

        International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: Nutrient timing

        One of the studies mentioned in the review above:

        http://clalit20plus.co.il/NR/rdonlyr...timing2001.pdf

        Post-exercise fat intake study :

        Postexercise fat intake repletes intramyocellular ... [Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2001] - PubMed result

        This aregument makes sense though, so perhaps I may cut back a little on the fat intake immediatley following exercise and see what happens.:

        Dietary Fat and Exercise Recovery
        Discussions of nutrition for post-exercise physiological recovery seldom have much to say about dietary fat. Carbohydrate, needed for glycogen replenishment; protein, needed for muscle repair and adaptation; and water, needed for rehydration, always dominate these discussions. Consequently, the average athlete may come away assuming that dietary fat plays little or no role in post-exercise recovery processes.

        The truth is that detary fat is very important for post-exercise recovery. Let’s take a look at how dietary fat supports post-exercise recovery, and how to make the best use of it for this purpose.

        Dietary fat is required to facilitate three separate processes related to post-exercise recovery. First, fat is needed to replenish depleted stores of intramuscular triglycerides. Second, fat is used to repair muscle cell membranes damaged during and after exercises. And finally, fat provides fuel and components for recovery-related immune system processes—particularly the inflammation response.

        Fat for Muscle Refueling
        Intramuscular triglycerides are the most readily available form of fat fuel for exercise because they are stored right next to the mitochondria—the site of aerobic metabolism—within muscle cells. Following prolonged exercise, triglyceride stores within the exercised muscles are depleted to the same extent as glycogen stores. Replenishing intramuscular triglycerides is an important means of maximizing fuel availability for the next workout. The size of the triglyceride stores within muscles is proportionate to the amount of dietary fat consumed recently. A recent Swiss study found that trained endurance athletes were able to increase their intramuscular triglyceride stores by 55 percent by increasing their fat intake during the last 1.5 days before a time trial.

        Fat for Muscle Repair
        Muscle cell membranes are composed of fat molecules. During exercise, many of these fat molecules are damaged by oxygen free radicals. Even more of them are damaged through the inflammation process that begins after the workout is completed. Naturally, new fat molecules are needed to repair muscle cell membranes damaged during and following a workout. Exercise training reduces the susceptibility of muscle cell membranes to oxidation by altering their composition. These adaptations are enhanced by a diet that includes plenty of monounsaturated fats, such as those found in olive oil. Thus, increasing your consumption of monounsaturated fats—or, better yet, replacing some of the saturated fats in your diet with monounsaturated fats—is a good way to enhance post-exercise recovery.

        Fat for Inflammation Control
        The inflammation process, while critical to post-exercise recovery, is a double-edged sword. On the positive side, inflammation facilitates muscle tissue repair by clearing cellular debris away from the site of damage and delivering raw materials for the synthesis of new cellular components. But in athletes who train hard every day, inflammation may get out of control and become chronic, thus negatively affecting performance.

        Dietary fat plays a number of roles in regulating the inflammation process. A study from the University of Buffalo found that runners on a low-fat diet (17% of total calories) had higher levels of inflammation than runners on a moderate-fat diet (32% of total calories) or a high-fat diet (41% of total calories). Omega-3 essential fatty acids in particular have been shown to reduce inflammation. In one study, individuals who consumed the largest amounts of fish high in omega-3 fats exhibited 33 percent lower levels of certain biomarkers of inflammation than those who ate the least amounts of omega-3-rich fish. Based on such findings, I recommend that all athletes take a daily fish oil supplement to reduce post-exercise inflammation for faster recovery.

        Timing Not Important

        While dietary fat is critical to post-exercise physiological recovery, there is no evidence that the specific timing of fat consumption has an independent effect. A large number of studies have shown that glycogen replenishment proceeds more quickly when carbohydrate is consumed within two hours after the completion of exercise, and that muscle protein synthesis is similarly accelerated with early post-exercise protein consumption. But dietary fat-related recovery processes appear to be maximized with adequate intake of the right types of fat regardless of timing.

        Research has clearly shown that glycogen replenishment is a high priority after exercise, whereas fat conservation is a low priority. Regardless of when, what, or how much athletes eat after exercise, their bodies increase their level of fat burning in order to maximize carbohydrate conservation and storage. The lesson we may glean from this fact is that dietary fat is not important for the acute phase of post-exercise recovery. Indeed, because fat slows the absorption of nutrients into the bloodstream, it’s probably best to minimize fat intake during the first two hours after exercise to promote rapid absorption of carbs and protein.

        The Fat Formula
        To maximize the positive effects of dietary fat on post-exercise recovery, try to get at least 20% and preferably at least 25% of your daily calories from fat. No more than half of these calories should come from saturated fat. And be sure to consume at least 2 grams of omega-3 fatty acids daily.

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        • #34
          Here's a little more food for thought:




          An article from 2004 ( I know it's a little old at this point)
          Nutrient Timing: Research You Can Use
          By Matt Fitzgerald
          July/August 2004
          For the Washington Running Report

          In a new book called Nutrient Timing, exercise physiologist John Ivy, Ph.D., and biochemist Robert Portman, Ph.D., argue that when athletes eat is as important as what they eat. Citing dozens of recent studies, they make a solid case. Although Nutrient Timing is aimed primarily at an audience of strength athletes, there is a lot of information in the book that is valuable to endurance athletes as well.

          Most endurance athletes are aware that it is beneficial to drink a carbohydrate sports drink during exercise. But according to the authors of Nutrient Timing, there are many other beneficial ways to use nutrition during and after exercise that most endurance athletes don't know about. Here are five of them:

          1. Consuming protein with carbohydrate during exercise can increase endurance.

          It appears that the effectiveness of carbohydrate consumption during exercise is limited by the maximum rate at which the liver can release glucose into the bloodstream-about one gram per minute. It's not hard to consume enough carbohydrate in a sports drink to reach this limit, and consuming any more will not help.

          But the muscles can also use protein for energy. A supplement combining carbohydrate and protein can therefore provide more energy and delay fatigue by allowing the muscles to conserve more glycogen (their main energy source). A study at the University of Texas compared the effects of a carbohydrate and a carbohydrate-protein supplement on endurance performance. Trained cyclists last thirty-six percent longer in a ride to exhaustion when fed the carbohydrate-protein drink than when fed the carbohydrate drink.

          2. Consuming protein during exercise can reduce muscle damage.

          When protein is not consumed during exercise, muscle proteins are broken down for energy, resulting in muscle damage. When protein is consumed during exercise, such damage is minimized.

          This was demonstrated in a study done at James Madison University. Researchers fed either a regular carbohydrate sports drink or a carbohydrate-protein drink to subjects during a hard stationary bike ride and measured post-exercise levels of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) in the blood. CPK is a biomarker of muscle damage. The subjects receiving the carbohydrate/protein supplement had CPK levels eighty-three percent lower than those receiving the carbohydrate supplement, indicating significantly less muscle damage during exercise.

          3. The sooner you consume nutrients after exercise, the more effective they are.

          The muscle cells are especially insulin sensitive for the first 45 minutes after exercise is completed. Insulin transports glucose and amino acids into the muscle cells and stimulates muscle protein and glycogen synthesis. Consuming carbohydrate and protein within this 45-minute window will therefore stimulate the muscle recovery processes much more powerfully than consuming the same nutrients later.

          In a study at Vanderbilt University, researchers looked at the effect of a carbohydrate-protein supplement on protein synthesis following a sixty-minute bout of exercise. Subjects were given the supplement immediately after exercise or three hours later. Protein synthesis was almost three times higher when the supplement was given immediately after the workout. Other studies have shown a similar pattern with respect to muscle glycogen replenishment.

          4. Post-exercise nutrition reduces injuries and sickness.

          In a remarkable new study, Marine recruits representing six platoons were assigned to one of three treatment protocols during 54 days of basic training. Each day after exercise, some Marines received a carbohydrate drink, others a carbohydrate- protein drink, and still others flavored water.

          The investigators reported that the protein supplemented group had an average of thirty-three percent fewer total medical visits, twenty-eight percent fewer visits due to bacterial/viral infections, thirty-seven percent fewer visits due to muscle/joint problems, and eighty-three percent fewer visits due to heat exhaustion compared to members of the other groups. They also had less muscle soreness.

          This new evidence indicates that athletes in heavy training will stay healthier if they consume a carbohydrate-protein supplement immediately following each workout. Strenuous exercise suppresses the immune system, opening the door to infections. Carbohydrate and the amino acid glutamine fuel the immune system and counteract this suppression.

          5. Post-exercise nutrition improves performance in the next workout.

          It stands to reason that if immediate supplementation after exercise results in a faster, stronger recovery, it could also improve performance in the next workout. The James Madison University study cited above showed this to be the case.

          After completing a performance ride on day one, the subjects of this study were asked to come back after a 15-hour recovery period. Upon returning, the subjects performed a ride to exhaustion at eighty-five percent of their VO2max. Subjects receiving the carbohydrate/protein drink during the initial performance ride the day before were able to ride almost forty percent longer than those receiving the carbohydrate drink during the prior exercise.

          Summary
          The science of sports nutrition has come a long way since the first sports drinks were formulated back in the '60s. It's time to bring your sports nutrition practice into the 21st century. The principles of Nutrient Timing show you how.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Karma View Post
            Here's a little more food for thought:




            An article from 2004 ( I know it's a little old at this point)
            Nutrient Timing: Research You Can Use
            By Matt Fitzgerald
            July/August 2004
            For the Washington Running Report

            In a new book called Nutrient Timing, exercise physiologist John Ivy, Ph.D., and biochemist Robert Portman, Ph.D., argue that when athletes eat is as important as what they eat. Citing dozens of recent studies, they make a solid case. Although Nutrient Timing is aimed primarily at an audience of strength athletes, there is a lot of information in the book that is valuable to endurance athletes as well.

            Most endurance athletes are aware that it is beneficial to drink a carbohydrate sports drink during exercise. But according to the authors of Nutrient Timing, there are many other beneficial ways to use nutrition during and after exercise that most endurance athletes don't know about. Here are five of them:

            1. Consuming protein with carbohydrate during exercise can increase endurance.

            It appears that the effectiveness of carbohydrate consumption during exercise is limited by the maximum rate at which the liver can release glucose into the bloodstream-about one gram per minute. It's not hard to consume enough carbohydrate in a sports drink to reach this limit, and consuming any more will not help.

            But the muscles can also use protein for energy. A supplement combining carbohydrate and protein can therefore provide more energy and delay fatigue by allowing the muscles to conserve more glycogen (their main energy source). A study at the University of Texas compared the effects of a carbohydrate and a carbohydrate-protein supplement on endurance performance. Trained cyclists last thirty-six percent longer in a ride to exhaustion when fed the carbohydrate-protein drink than when fed the carbohydrate drink.

            2. Consuming protein during exercise can reduce muscle damage.

            When protein is not consumed during exercise, muscle proteins are broken down for energy, resulting in muscle damage. When protein is consumed during exercise, such damage is minimized.

            This was demonstrated in a study done at James Madison University. Researchers fed either a regular carbohydrate sports drink or a carbohydrate-protein drink to subjects during a hard stationary bike ride and measured post-exercise levels of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) in the blood. CPK is a biomarker of muscle damage. The subjects receiving the carbohydrate/protein supplement had CPK levels eighty-three percent lower than those receiving the carbohydrate supplement, indicating significantly less muscle damage during exercise.

            3. The sooner you consume nutrients after exercise, the more effective they are.

            The muscle cells are especially insulin sensitive for the first 45 minutes after exercise is completed. Insulin transports glucose and amino acids into the muscle cells and stimulates muscle protein and glycogen synthesis. Consuming carbohydrate and protein within this 45-minute window will therefore stimulate the muscle recovery processes much more powerfully than consuming the same nutrients later.

            In a study at Vanderbilt University, researchers looked at the effect of a carbohydrate-protein supplement on protein synthesis following a sixty-minute bout of exercise. Subjects were given the supplement immediately after exercise or three hours later. Protein synthesis was almost three times higher when the supplement was given immediately after the workout. Other studies have shown a similar pattern with respect to muscle glycogen replenishment.

            4. Post-exercise nutrition reduces injuries and sickness.

            In a remarkable new study, Marine recruits representing six platoons were assigned to one of three treatment protocols during 54 days of basic training. Each day after exercise, some Marines received a carbohydrate drink, others a carbohydrate- protein drink, and still others flavored water.

            The investigators reported that the protein supplemented group had an average of thirty-three percent fewer total medical visits, twenty-eight percent fewer visits due to bacterial/viral infections, thirty-seven percent fewer visits due to muscle/joint problems, and eighty-three percent fewer visits due to heat exhaustion compared to members of the other groups. They also had less muscle soreness.

            This new evidence indicates that athletes in heavy training will stay healthier if they consume a carbohydrate-protein supplement immediately following each workout. Strenuous exercise suppresses the immune system, opening the door to infections. Carbohydrate and the amino acid glutamine fuel the immune system and counteract this suppression.

            5. Post-exercise nutrition improves performance in the next workout.

            It stands to reason that if immediate supplementation after exercise results in a faster, stronger recovery, it could also improve performance in the next workout. The James Madison University study cited above showed this to be the case.

            After completing a performance ride on day one, the subjects of this study were asked to come back after a 15-hour recovery period. Upon returning, the subjects performed a ride to exhaustion at eighty-five percent of their VO2max. Subjects receiving the carbohydrate/protein drink during the initial performance ride the day before were able to ride almost forty percent longer than those receiving the carbohydrate drink during the prior exercise.

            Summary
            The science of sports nutrition has come a long way since the first sports drinks were formulated back in the '60s. It's time to bring your sports nutrition practice into the 21st century. The principles of Nutrient Timing show you how.
            Thank you for this
            If you have a problem with what you read: 1. Get a dictionary 2. Don't read it 3. Grow up 4. After 3, go back to 1/ or 2. -- Dennis Blue. | "I don't care about your opinion, only your analysis"- Professor Calabrese. | "Life is more important than _______" - Drew | I eat animals that eat vegetables -- Matt Millen, former NFL Linebacker. | "This country is built on sugar & shit that comes in a box marinated in gluten - abc123

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            • #36
              Originally posted by pdoerner3 View Post
              Post workout nutrient timing is actually very important. You have about a 45 minute window post workout where your muscles are most open to adaptation. Depending on what type of workout you just did that could either be an increase in added muscle or mitochondria etc. Especially after a hard workout, your muscles are in a catabolic state and if you want to switch to an anabolic state you need to get in nutrients. The best way to stop catabolism is by increasing insulin as it is a very anabolic hormone. Thus, post workout it is actually beneficial to consume some type of simple sugar. I'm not saying eat a whole loaf of white bread, but a low fiber high sugar fruit like banana or kiwi or orange is extremely beneficial.
              This is a pretty controversial topic. I've read many conflicting studies on this topic. But I feel best with a sweet potato, beef or lamb and a side of steamed veggies with butter.

              Comment


              • #37
                So fat PWO slows the absorption of nutrients into the bloodstream but why is that so important? Wouldn't it be better to not spike insulin and have the rate of absorption spread over a longer period of time as opposed to the quick absorption of nutrients that carbs PWO would provide?

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by foodaddict View Post
                  So fat PWO slows the absorption of nutrients into the bloodstream but why is that so important? Wouldn't it be better to not spike insulin and have the rate of absorption spread over a longer period of time as opposed to the quick absorption of nutrients that carbs PWO would provide?
                  I think what's important is that your muscles are more insulin sensitive post-workout (your GLUT4 receptors move to the cell surface) so they preferentially take up glucose, whereas under normal circumstances more of the glucose you eat would go toward fat storage. Eating fat (palmitic acid specifically) causes your muscles to become more insulin resistant so the carbs you eat post-workout would act more like they would if you hadn't worked out at all.

                  A quick Google search turned up this: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10090331
                  It's a rat study, so results will probably vary with us humans, but they found: "Fast-twitch red muscle GLUT4 mRNA was increased by 53% above control immediately post-exercise, but returned to the control level by 1.5 h of recovery. GLUT4 mRNA associated with polysomes, however, increased significantly during this time and remained elevated for a minimum of 5 h."

                  I'd take this as an indication that sooner post-workout = better if you're carbing up. Maybe I should start bringing my post-workout meal to work, since it's usually about an hour after I'm done at the gym before I can get home and eat.
                  Last edited by yodiewan; 06-23-2011, 07:26 AM. Reason: Additional info

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Thanks for the article. Good info. Very interesting.

                    You ever thought of supplementing BCAA's during your workout. I havent done alot of research into it but i've met a few guys who do it and they seem pretty knowledgable about nutrition. So it must have some benefits.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Whatever fruits in the fridge or in the basket. Usually banana cause it my fav with some whole milk =) its a comfort combo from my childhood (minus the cheerios of course) and some whey protein powder. Make sure you look for a good quality. No hydrogenated oils or cheap sweeteners. Oh and even if there aren't any hydrogenated oils still read on to what fats are in it. I recently had to dump a powder I was using because it has sunflower oil in it xP

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                      • #41
                        I almost always workout fasted and almost always take BCAAs pre-workout. Supposedly it prevents muscle catabolism. Check out leangains for more info.

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                        • #42
                          I also found this: http://ajpendo.physiology.org/content/285/4/E729.full

                          Basically it seems to show that exercise raises GLUT4 activity in muscles until they have restored glycogen. So maybe it doesn't matter when you carb-up, I don't know.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by foodaddict View Post
                            Thanks for the article. Good info. Very interesting.

                            You ever thought of supplementing BCAA's during your workout. I havent done alot of research into it but i've met a few guys who do it and they seem pretty knowledgable about nutrition. So it must have some benefits.
                            I supplement with BCAA's often on long training days and in my recovery shakes too. I recovery quite well and as an N=1 study BCAA's seem to help.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Good stuff, yeah I read BCAA's are best taken on an empty stomach.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                I workout at lunch and right after I eat...

                                A big salad with meat... evoo and balsamic
                                Banana
                                Multi, vit d, fish oil

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