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What to eat after exercise?

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  • What to eat after exercise?



    I enjoy doing yoga, including occasionally hot yoga (which is essentially a series of intense intervals).


    I couldn't find any info on what the best post-workout fuel is, especially for after the more intense moderate activity.


    Any ideas?


  • #2
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    After my workout (which is usually in the morning) I opt for a big ol' omelet. Lots of veggies and eggs, and sometimes meat.

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    • #3
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      Thanks, Diana. So the veggies will do the trick in place of grains or beans? I don't know much about the technicalities of exercise nutrition--and I'm a neophyte in the primal lifestyle--but I was told that if I don't eat some carbs, my body would draw fuel from the muscles.

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      • #4
        1



        I've learned the conventional wisdom is generally wrong. As long as you're not doing chronic cardio workouts, a healthy heap of veggies is just fine. That's the thing with PB. Your body becomes more efficient at using fat as fuel, so relies less on carbs.

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        • #5
          1



          I don't find a need to eat anything after a workout.


          When I work out has nothing to do with my meals. If I work out before or after my main meal, then so be it.


          I eat almost zero carb and have no problems putting on muscle/gaining strength.

          The "Seven Deadly Sins"

          Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
          Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
          Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

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          • #6
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            Fascinating. Thanks.

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            • #7
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              for me the best approach is working out early in the morning after 10-12 hours of fasting and not eating anything 2-3 hours after...

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              • #8
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                Wow. In the primal world there are no worries about muscles starving and depleting, huh?

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                • #9
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                  When you eat fewer carbs, you have less insulin in your blood, and your fat cells are more able to release fatty acids to your liver, so you get energy that way. When you get plenty of ketones and glucose from your body fat, your body is not likely to catabolize muscle proteins.

                  If you eat more carbs, your insulin stays elevated long after they're digested, and your fat cells are less able to release fatty acids, and your liver is not geared for metabolizing fat to the same degree, so your body is more likely to try to use muscle protein as fuel.

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                  • #10
                    1



                    I vote the no eating option (I've also asked this before and was advised thusly).

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                    • #11
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                      Hope people don't mind me asking a related question:


                      I wonder if this still holds true if following a very intense exercise programme ie can you replenish liver and muscle glycogen sufficiently quickly from fat if consuming low carbs (100gm/day suggested by this site).

                      I've just added a couple of crossfit workouts to my 3x/week strength training and am seeing a resulting reduction in strength. I'm eating 4800kcal/day (P22% C9% F69%). The general response from crossfit followers seems to be that some post workout carbs are necessary.


                      Also, a book which attempts to address this issue from a 'paleo' perspective:


                      http://home.trainingpeaks.com/articles/nutrition/quick-guide-the-paleo-diet-for-athletes.aspx


                      talks about the addition of low GI carbs pre workout, high GI carbs (various forms of sugar, fruit juice) immediately post workout, followed by low GI carbs afterwards. This seems to be a reversion to CW thinking...


                      Just wondered what the thoughts of those following such an exercise regime are ie have they succumbed to eating more carbs around workouts or have they managed to work through the adaption phase and continue strength and performance gains without carb use ?

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                      • #12
                        1



                        Thanks, Nick, for the clear and succinct explanation.


                        I hope someone answers andrewc's question, too.

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                        • #13
                          1



                          The PB book suggests that if you are doing more exercise/training than the PB exercise pyramid suggests -- which is really moderate compared to what you describe -- you might add up to 100 g carbs per extra hour of hard work, depending on the individual.


                          As for timing, the most up-to-date paleo and evolutionary fitness (see Art Devany) advice counsels that consuming them immediately will halt the benefits of increased growth hormone and increased insulin sensitivity that exercise provides, because of the insulin release they induce.


                          I honestly think this is very personal to you and your goals (i.e., one size does not fit all). If you are already lean and just need more energy because you are training for something, you could probably eat them whenever you want. But if you are trying to get more lean or just working to improve your bio-markers or overall health, you'd be better off avoiding them after your workout to maximize the hormonal benefits of the exercise.

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                          • #14
                            1



                            Thanks Dragline.

                            Agnieszka, Hopes that helps you.


                            I've had feedback from some who have mixed high GI carbs post workout with a very high fat diet, but the conclusion is vague, some report strength gains but with a greater propensity to gain abdominal fat in comparison with just protein PWO, others not.


                            I'd also be concerned about the effect on triglycerides, but again reports vary, with some experiencing no significant changes.


                            Response from some crossfit followers is a preference for healthier carb sources PWO, like sweet potato, in agreement with Mark's recommendation.

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