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  • Electrolyte Replacement



    Greetings All:


    Summer training = heavy perspiration.


    Commercial Drinks = Sugary junk.


    Homemade Healthy Primal Recipe = ? ? ?


    Your help = My gratitude : - )


  • #2
    1



    I've seen tennis players take a swig of water and a mouthful of banana between games. IIRC, bananas are high in potassium. I suppose you could take a tiny pinch of seasalt, too.


    Basically, I'd have thought skip the drinks and have water and just a little something to eat with it.


    Alternatively, Sally Fallon's Nourishing Traditions has got recipes for a number of lactic-fermented beverages in it:


    http://www.amazon.com/dp/0967089735/


    Those might be worth trying, if you're game for the work of making them. They apparently have plenty of mineral ions in them, and they have lactobacilli, which are good for the gut. She says they were traditional drinks for people doing physical work in several parts of the world, and if that's so I suppose they'll have proved themselves over time.

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    • #3
      1



      Coconut water. Just make sure you don't get one with added sugar.

      Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

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      • #4
        1



        I just get the little packets from the health food store. They store in your purse or pocket and have zero added sugars, etc.


        Just open, dump in a bottle of water and voila!

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        • #5
          1



          Ultima. Sugar free electrolyte replacement drink.

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          • #6
            1



            Endurolytes, by Hammer Nutrition


            http://www.hammernutrition.com/za/HNT?PAGE=PRODUCT&PROD.ID=4037#info4


            the powder form has no sugars of any kind.

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            • #7
              1



              I was at UF when the original work was being done under contract with the military to find a way to stop heat exhaustion in the troops. The football department was obviously interested. Summer practice in Gainesville is brutal, 95 and 95 temp and RH. That year no player dropped from heat exhaustion, neither in practice or during the season, IIRC. The Gators had a secret weapon.


              Gatorade works by a simple principle: Put back into your body what you sweat and urinate out and add some fast sugar carbs for energy.


              I used to make a version of Gatorade at home. I reversed engineered the real product by using the calories and mg's of salts to get something really close.....and very, very cheap. a packet of unsweetened Kool-Aid (yeah, yeah), some salt, some salt substitute (for the potassium)and some type of sugar.


              You also need a sweetener or some source of quick carbs. Gatorade's biggest ingredient is sucrose, and the second is dextrose. The latter (also known as maltose) delivers its energy much slower than sucrose. You could get some of these slow release results by using brown rice syrup.


              Comments on the above post: There is no potassium in table salt, sea or otherwise. Electrolyte packages may or may not be fully effective, depends on your energy needs. You can get all the electrolyte you need from salt and salt substitute. The only metals you need to replace are sodium and potassium.

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              • #8
                1



                http://www.historyofbranding.com/gatorade.html

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                • #9
                  1



                  OTOH http://www.snopes.com/food/origins/gatorade.asp and virtually every other site I found about the history.


                  Not saying that there wasn't precedent at FSU - although no self respecting Gator will ever admit to it. But even before Gatorade everyone knew to use a lot of salt at meals or take salt pills when you sweat a lot. Very few scientific advances are 100% original.


                  Maybe the origins at UF have become the stuff of legend, who knows? Dr. Cades died about a year ago, BTW.

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                  • #10
                    1



                    I would go with VitaCoco. Its pure coconut water (nothing added) and it has more electrolytes and much more potassium than most commercial sports drinks. Plus its yummy (and I guess can be considered primal if Grok was in a tropical area with access to coconuts, it makes sense if he ate the meat/oil that he wouldn't just throw out the liquid inside.

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                    • #11
                      1



                      Gatorade is a croc, personally I wouldnt touch it with a barge pole. ingredients listed, table salt. table salt? the one thats been stripped of any nutritional value? hfcs? huh, I get it, its CARBOHYDRATE replacement for those brain washed, arm chair sports people to sedate them further.


                      "water, sugar, table salt, carbohydrates, electrolytes (110 mg sodium, 30 mg potassium, 93 mg chloride), high fructose corn syrup, artificial colors, glucose, fructose, and sugar.

                      Gatorade was designed to keep athletes hydrated during competition. The "unique blend of fluid, electrolytes, and carbohydrates" creates a drink that hydrates better than water during times of active workouts.Because of the amount of carbohydrates in Gatorade, over consumption can cause obesity."

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                      • #12
                        1



                        To move from conjecture to fact, coconut water is water comes from immature coconuts. (Coconut milk is the result of hot water and mature coconuts. Two very different products.) To this day, a Grok descendant whacks the top of the "nut" off, or punches a hole in an "eye" and drinks.


                        It's carbs, 1/3 fiber and 2/3 sugars. a bit of fats, surprisingly good proteins, and very good potassium. About 18 times that found in Gatorade.


                        http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3115/2


                        I don't think the brand matters, it shouldn't. I guess you could be on the lookout for preservatives or something.


                        And BTW, if one does go the Gatorade route, use the powdered. The liquid uses HFCS first, and sucrose second. The powder of course has no HFCS and also has slower release dextrose.

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                        • #13
                          1



                          My athletic background is as an ultrarunner. The best way to maintain electrolyte balance (IMHO) is with water and Succeed caps (http://www.succeedscaps.com/main_scaps.html). Succeed are specially formulated electrolyte capsules that provide the correct amounts of sodium, potassium and other electrolytes. The website has great information about how much to take, etc. Any commercial drink with enough sodium to make any significat difference isn't going to be pallatable.


                          Unless you're running for hours you don't need calories during exercise...no matter what the drink companies tell you. When it comes to being primal, nothing beats water and pure electrolytes.

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                          • #14
                            1



                            Thank you all ! "Get Primal", I am definitely going to follow-up with Succeed caps. It sounds like exactly what I'm looking for, (even though I thought I wanted to create something homemade,) and I completely agree with you that, " Unless you're running for hours you don't need calories during exercise...no matter what the drink companies tell you. When it comes to being primal, nothing beats water and pure electrolytes."

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                            • #15
                              1



                              Beer.

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