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fine tuning - fun or waste of time?

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  • fine tuning - fun or waste of time?

    Hello everyone
    Happy new year - if I can still say so?!

    Since the new year has started I thought about changing some things in my "schedule".
    I discovered the fun of doing different dumbbell exercises for certain muscles (chest/shoulders/biceps and triceps) after a full body workout or core/stability/BW exercises or before my HIIT.
    Are these added 15 minutes a waste of time or do they make any sense? Do you focus on certain muscels or do just do the "big five"?
    Don't know how long this new love will last, but before I get deeper into that, I'd like to know if it's worth to invest?!?!
    Looking forward to opinions!

  • #2
    Learning ways to hit the muscles through their full range of motion and different strength curves is never a waste of time.

    Core/stability work however......................

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    • #3
      I've recently read the opposite: smaller muscles are always working when "supporting" the bigger ones.
      e.g. chest presses also hit the triceps, seated rows need the biceps. So lifting heavy enough is workout enough for the smaller muscles.

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      • #4
        If someone is doing pink dumbbell curls while standing on a bosu ball, but not doing heavy squats, they're doing it wrong.

        Sent via lightsaber

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        • #5
          Originally posted by gergirl View Post
          I've recently read the opposite: smaller muscles are always working when "supporting" the bigger ones.
          e.g. chest presses also hit the triceps, seated rows need the biceps. So lifting heavy enough is workout enough for the smaller muscles.

          Unfortuntely thats a urban MYTH, but it also depends on your goals! Squatting or bench pressing will not give you great forearms, calves or lateral delts if you are not extremely gifted in your genetics for those bodyparts...
          "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

          - Schopenhauer

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mr. Anthony View Post
            If someone is doing pink dumbbell curls while standing on a bosu ball, but not doing heavy squats, they're doing it wrong.

            Sent via lightsaber
            wasn't talking about lifting pink things standing on funny gadgets...any serious contribution?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by gergirl View Post
              I've recently read the opposite: smaller muscles are always working when "supporting" the bigger ones.
              e.g. chest presses also hit the triceps, seated rows need the biceps. So lifting heavy enough is workout enough for the smaller muscles.
              You are quite correct but just because they are ' working ' doesn't mean they are working anywhere near hard enough to cause an adaptive response. This is also where the ' Stability/ Core ' garbage falls down. Every muscle can be described as a stabilizer as they all contract at various times to help keep us stable, however, doing say standing press instead of seated because it works more ' stabilizers ' is hogwash because although more minor muscles might be involved they are not being worked hard enough to make it worthwhile.

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              • #8
                good point that's why I'm asking and not just reading

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gergirl View Post
                  good point that's why I'm asking and not just reading
                  The fact that you are open to learning automatically makes you better than 90% of the narrow minded people on the fitness forums !

                  Check out Ben Pakulski on You tube, he really knows the scientific side of exercising, this is one good example:

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Gergirl, Why train like a strength specialist i.e. power lifter if your goals are general “strength” fitness? Here some stuff to ponder;

                    T NATION | 5 Strategies for Choosing Exercises
                    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                    - Schopenhauer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you guys want a bit of my contribution on the stabilizer debate (as if you had a choice ) here it is:

                      Your "core" is your torso. Everything that is in between the four ball in socket joints (hips and shoulders) is your core. As such your core requires stiffness. That is the muscles of the core are made to be maximally stiff for transfer of power and strength through the limbs. Think of any swinging sport....tennis, golf, baseball....the tension/stiffening of the core is used to transfer maximal power to stroke. Deadlifts, squats, shoulder press, hell the leg press as well..... the core remains stiff and strong so that the lifts can be performed without injury. As such what is the best way to challenge the core? Lifting heavy stuff that makes you stabilize and stiffen the core through the range of your extremity movements. Some unilateral work doesn't hurt either, so I'm not adverse to things like a one arm farmers carry or press periodically.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                        If you guys want a bit of my contribution on the stabilizer debate (as if you had a choice ) here it is:

                        Your "core" is your torso. Everything that is in between the four ball in socket joints (hips and shoulders) is your core. As such your core requires stiffness. That is the muscles of the core are made to be maximally stiff for transfer of power and strength through the limbs. Think of any swinging sport....tennis, golf, baseball....the tension/stiffening of the core is used to transfer maximal power to stroke. Deadlifts, squats, shoulder press, hell the leg press as well..... the core remains stiff and strong so that the lifts can be performed without injury. As such what is the best way to challenge the core? Lifting heavy stuff that makes you stabilize and stiffen the core through the range of your extremity movements. Some unilateral work doesn't hurt either, so I'm not adverse to things like a one arm farmers carry or press periodically.
                        Bang on buddy, good post.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                          Your "core" is your torso. Everything that is in between the four ball in socket joints (hips and shoulders) is your core. As such your core requires stiffness.
                          Core = torso??? I think you are going to work hard by convincing fitness enthusiasts about that point! The core in my book will still be lower back and abs until I see any good arguments to change my concepts here...
                          "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                          - Schopenhauer

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Gorbag View Post
                            Core = torso??? I think you are going to work hard by convincing fitness enthusiasts about that point! The core in my book will still be lower back and abs until I see any good arguments to change my concepts here...
                            Thats the way I had seen it for many years as well, but I've changed my tune in the past several years.

                            I have been heavily influenced by my reading of works by both Craig Liebenson's "Rehabilitation of the Spine" and basically everything by Stuart McGill that I can get my hands on..... So here are just a couple things if you are interested:

                            http://www.backfitpro.com/documents/...reTraining.pdf

                            That fella has a website here BackFitPro.com

                            His credentials and research in this area is quite lengthy: Stuart McGill Research

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by OldSchhool View Post
                              You are quite correct but just because they are ' working ' doesn't mean they are working anywhere near hard enough to cause an adaptive response. This is also where the ' Stability/ Core ' garbage falls down. Every muscle can be described as a stabilizer as they all contract at various times to help keep us stable, however, doing say standing press instead of seated because it works more ' stabilizers ' is hogwash because although more minor muscles might be involved they are not being worked hard enough to make it worthwhile.
                              This is partly the difference in the approach to strength training from a bodybuilding vs strength standpoint. Your point is valid if your goal is maximum hypertrophy in all muscles. However, if you are training for strength and not bodybuilding, why do, for example, my forearms need more work than they get from heavy deadlifts and chin-ups? The lifter training for strength, such as myself, would say your forearms don't need more work unless your grip is causing you to fail those exercises.

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