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Is perpetual training hard on the body?

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  • Is perpetual training hard on the body?

    Every Monday I do some squats and presses and deadlifts and am sore until about Thursday when I do some more squats and presses and then I'm sore until about Monday when I do it all again. Isn't it stressful to live in this perpetual state of training, constantly ripping your flesh apart to build new flesh only to rip it apart again? Does this shorten your telomoeres or anything like that, make you age at the same time it's providing a sort of fountain of youth effect?
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

  • #2
    I don't know about any telomeres, but I know that muscle mass has a lot of benefits, and it's awesomer to be strong than not to be strong. I also think deloads are a necessary evil for anybody but a novice doing a linear progression. These are good times to schedule vacations, deaths in the family, or anything else that's hard to work into your training schedule.
    The Champagne of Beards

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    • #3
      I don’t care of telomeres or whatever as long as I feel great and recover from my workouts with plenty of energy for other tasks in life! I enjoy train or exercise twice a day most of the weekdays and today I am just a little sore after a grueling lifting session yesterday! Train more, eat well and recover better I say…
      "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

      - Schopenhauer

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      • #4
        You may need more time to recover. Try a week? Sleep is also very important for recovery.

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        • #5
          It's been proven that some muscle damage can as long as a few weeks to fully recover. If you consider damage to our outer tissue(skin)and think how long a cut can take to form new skin. Now consider the theory that our skin is designed to heal faster than our internal tissue so as to stop infection with it being so exposed to the external bacteria and such like. There is no reason that muscle tissue should heal any faster than our skin and in truth it probably takes much longer.
          I work each body part every 8 days and although there is bound to be a slight carryover from body part to body part,it is not overly significant.

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          • #6
            It's a great question and I dont have a scientific answer. I think it is possible to do too much of just about anything though. And by that I mean sometimes we should probably have more rest between sessions but I also mean some take the whole thing to an extreme. They are on an infinite quest for size and strength gains. I would have to believe that at some point you hit a ceiling and it may not be great for your body. At the same time, I suspect that over doing a healthful thing is still better than over doing an unhealthy thing.

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            • #7
              I left heavy weights 2-3 times a week working at increasing weight but actually going up VERY slowly. The only time I am sore is if I take some time off for vacation or whatever and then it is only mildness in pecs and quads. I feel like you should not be sore like you are all the time. Not sure who you would see to figure out why though. Would you still be sore if you dropped back on the weight and just did a very light day? Maybe you are pushing too hard to fast. My last trainer suggested I should be doing a light day (65% max) and medium day (75% max) and a heavy day (85-95% max) or thereabouts, not just lifting as heavy as possible all the time. The lighter days are used for form and more reps. Just some thoughts for you.

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              • #8
                Muscles take between 4-7 days to fully recover from a workout and another 2-3 days for over-compensation to take place. It can also take up to 7-14 days for the neuro - muscular system to fully recover from a high intensity strength training session.
                A Strength Training Tip: Muscle Recovery

                This week my leg session consisted of 3 total sets and I was sore, my back workout was also 3 sets and resulted in soreness. Most people are performing way too much volume and way too frequently.
                Last edited by OldSchhool; 12-17-2013, 11:01 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by snoops View Post
                  I left heavy weights 2-3 times a week working at increasing weight but actually going up VERY slowly. The only time I am sore is if I take some time off for vacation or whatever and then it is only mildness in pecs and quads. I feel like you should not be sore like you are all the time. Not sure who you would see to figure out why though. Would you still be sore if you dropped back on the weight and just did a very light day? Maybe you are pushing too hard to fast. My last trainer suggested I should be doing a light day (65% max) and medium day (75% max) and a heavy day (85-95% max) or thereabouts, not just lifting as heavy as possible all the time. The lighter days are used for form and more reps. Just some thoughts for you.
                  Your trainer sound like a vise guy...
                  "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                  - Schopenhauer

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                  • #10
                    I guess my question is more along the lines of how healthy is it to remain in a state of perpetual training, where you are always creating the training stress and recovering from it. Is it healthy to do this forever? For a few years? How long? Does anyone know?
                    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                    • #11
                      i dont know the scientific answer. apparently coffee shortens your telomores ( sp?) and alcohol lengthens them i was reading the other day so i am doomed anyways. i only go to the gym once a week and do really big weights. sometimes i get doms but generally i dont. things like my pecs usually hurt a bit but the rest of me is all good these days. even when i go up in what i can lift. none of the doms i have ever gotten has been crippling. just a bit stiff and once you start moving it either goes or you get to that nice feeling where it doesnt hurt but you can feel every movement. i reckon you could scale it back a bit and do lighter workouts the other days or one body part per gym session. i've never done a split program as it is not practicable to where i live. too much travelling to town. i still mess around with the dumbbells, clubbells and the barbell at home. but much lighter weights, higher volume. and i walk lots. i've prob only been doing the real heavy weights for 2+ years now vs lighter weights higher volume and/or chronic cardio. i'm still the same size, just buffer. my upper body strength has increased heaps so better for real life applications. in terms of unscientifically, i dont consider myself to overdo it overall. a lot of people think i do. but i look prob a good 5 years younger than i really am. my body isnt falling to pieces and i have far less general aches, pains and ailments than anyone i know in my age group. i can also do far more than most of them physically. so, unscientifically, i think moderation is the key but it is a relative word.

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                      • #12
                        Is it healthy to do this forever? For a few years? How long? Does anyone know?
                        cross posted with you. i think that would depend on so many variables but i always always say what i do needs to be maintainable. when i am 70 i will be able to do what i do now. and i look at it like that. plus if i am waking up in the morning and trying to get out of bed but feel like i am dying, it's not fun.

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                        • #13
                          The smartest answer besides "it depends" is to look at people who DO crazy hard work their whole lives. Remember all that buzz a few months ago about the Victorian era, and that generation who did crazy hard labor and grew taller, had better teeth and lived longer than the generation before or after? They were expending so much energy (like 3500 calories a day or something) that they were able to eat more and take in even more nutrients, goes one theory. Or maybe it was the higher rate of tissue turnover keeping them young.
                          Or...

                          But we're not doing hard labor, we're just exercising once in awhile, so IDK!!!

                          Think about a crazy hard job you're had. The first few days give you such aches and pains, but by the end of week two you're throwing around 200-pound objects like chaff and talking and laughing while you do it. So maybe you should work out less frequently to heal, or maybe you should work out...more often so your body can fully adapt! Then take weekends off, planned days of rest, etc. so it's not chronic stress.
                          Crohn's, doing SCD

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                            I guess my question is more along the lines of how healthy is it to remain in a state of perpetual training, where you are always creating the training stress and recovering from it. Is it healthy to do this forever? For a few years? How long? Does anyone know?
                            I think that would be impossible to answer, there are far too many variables such as genetics etc. We all must know someone who smoked and drank heavily all their lives, did no real exercise and still lived to be close to a 100 and for everyone like that there is the health freak that dies at 50. In your particular case I'd say that you need more time between workouts, for any advice beyond that I'd just say do what you enjoy and don't worry about it.........after all we could get killed crossing the road tomorrow, [ LIFE IS BUT A BREATH ].

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                            • #15
                              i think it depends how much you buy into the 'any inflammation is bad inflammation' idea. i don't think being sore, but in an overall anabolic state (i.e. the majority of time, you're getting stronger/increasing mass) is bad. at all. i will edit this response with a link to a loooooong ass article about inflammation when i can find it (can't currently remember where i saw it!).

                              *edit: that didn't take long. here it is: http://startingstrength.com/articles...n_sullivan.pdf

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