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  • #31
    Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
    I don't think the breathing for powerlifting is all that terribly complicated that you need any kind of yoga training for it. You're mostly NOT breathing while you're lifting anyway. You're holding your breath most of the time.

    I don't know about men, but women tend to have enough natural flexibility for weight lifting. Often they have too much flexibility rather than not enough.

    After I burn 600 calories on the stairmaster I like to do 100 crunches for my abs. I usually get enough of a bicep workout curling my little purse doggie.
    Great point regarding the hypermobility that lots of women have, sometimes a conscious effort should be made not to take the exercises to the extremes that their bodies might allow.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by edennperez1 View Post
      I would REALLY love people's thoughts on isolated ab exercises. Meaning, intentionally working the abs separately from the work they get in compound exercises. I'm new to powerlifting and work with a trainer. We do an ab accessory exercise probably about once a week. But I'm recently coming from a CW place where in the past I worked my abs at the end of every group fitness class or regularly on my own. I wouldn't say I feel like they look/feel any differently either way (still have weight to lose to expose the six pack!). Its just hard to re-train my mind to believe that the compound exercises are all I need for my abs. Or that once a week is good enough. Is that even true? Thoughts?
      Steve Reeves didn't train his abs
      Steve Reeve's Ab Training

      The thinking in those days was that they wanted their waistline to be as small as possible
      https://www.google.com/search?q=stev...w=1280&bih=637
      Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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      • #33
        What equipment do you have available, any ?
        Step, ball, dumbbells, band but everything is in the basement
        I am thinking to adopt the 100 push-ups program to tricep push-ups.
        Last edited by Leida; 12-16-2013, 06:40 PM.
        My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
        When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Leida View Post
          Step, ball, dumbbells, band but everything is in the basement
          I am thinking to adopt the 100 push-ups program to tricep push-ups.
          Have you ever tried push ups using intentions ? You can do them without but I find them best placing an object between your hands. You then push your hands together squeezing your chest ( your hands won't actually move )all throughout the reps. The difference between doing this and doing them normally is like light and day. Be prepared for very low reps !

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          • #35
            Originally posted by TheyCallMeLazarus View Post
            I do some powerlifting (not a USAW member anything, but consistent locally) and I have a pretty defined stomach, so I will try to throw in here:
            -- It is NOT true that compounds are all you need to have the proper core strength, if you are a novice. In this case, especially if one is coming from machine training, it is common for there to be crazy imbalances in the chest and quads....in other words, your limiting factor in your 1RM of say a clean is your back, not your leg drive. The same holds true for squats and deads, in that if you are starting out you need to focus on the core a little more to get it up to par.
            -- Once that level is achieved though, where the core is not limiting the lifts, it is pretty safe to just use the compounds to a point....I have found that for myself, I was limited on the my snatch weight by my posterior chain once I built the weight up enough. My leg drive is never the problem, so if this is you as well, building up the core is the way.
            -- With the above said, a lot of the conventional ways of doing core are not sufficient for the loads involved in oly lifting. Things like crunches or ab machines are never going to get your core ready for a 500+lb deadlift. I use only 3 exercises for my core, but all 3 are very stressful: 1) gravity boots with kettleball 2) Weighted glute-ham raises 3) weighted planks

            On the planks, you will likely need a helper. You get into a normal plank, then slowly have weight added onto your back. I have gotten up to 180lbs for a 5 second hold.....this will simulate the short bursts needed for a really heavy pull.

            @ EKath

            You do understand that almost any competitive powerlifter is EXTREMELY flexible, correct? The real reason why most guys that are really strong cannot do heavy oly lifts is NOT strength, it is flexibility. Same goes for a lot of high-level athletes....For example, it has been said that a lot of NHL hockey players, at least the smaller goal-scorers, are usually more flexible than a competitive figure skater.

            Almost all application of force, whether in sports or oly lifting, relies on flexibility. This is why most athletic guys are incredibly flexible....I feel like you have this image of a slow, lumbering meathead carrying boulders around; when in reality a lot of powerlifters and elite athletes can do the splits, and one guy I know (he has set the record at my gym for power snatch) can lock his knees and put his ELBOWS to the ground. He is 6 foot 4 and 245. That is hard
            Weighted glute/ham raise. Now that's awesome. I love the glute/ham raise but I'm still working on body weight.

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            • #36
              [QUOTE=TheyCallMeLazarus;1383093]I do some powerlifting (not a USAW member anything, but consistent locally) and I have a pretty defined stomach, so I will try to throw in here:
              -- It is NOT true that compounds are all you need to have the proper core strength, if you are a novice. In this case, especially if one is coming from machine training, it is common for there to be crazy imbalances in the chest and quads....in other words, your limiting factor in your 1RM of say a clean is your back, not your leg drive. The same holds true for squats and deads, in that if you are starting out you need to focus on the core a little more to get it up to par.
              -- Once that level is achieved though, where the core is not limiting the lifts, it is pretty safe to just use the compounds to a point....I have found that for myself, I was limited on the my snatch weight by my posterior chain once I built the weight up enough. My leg drive is never the problem, so if this is you as well, building up the core is the way.
              -- With the above said, a lot of the conventional ways of doing core are not sufficient for the loads involved in oly lifting. Things like crunches or ab machines are never going to get your core ready for a 500+lb deadlift. I use only 3 exercises for my core, but all 3 are very stressful: 1) gravity boots with kettleball 2) Weighted glute-ham raises 3) weighted planks

              On the planks, you will likely need a helper. You get into a normal plank, then slowly have weight added onto your back. I have gotten up to 180lbs for a 5 second hold.....this will simulate the short bursts needed for a really heavy pull./QUOTE]

              So helpful!! Thank you!!

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              • #37
                Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                Mr. Anthony hangs out with bearded adolescent girls. You heard it right from the source.
                Cause you are actually one? Oh okay...

                ------
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                My Journal: gelatin experiments, vanity pictures, law school rants, recipe links


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                • #38
                  Originally posted by edennperez1
                  So helpful!! Thank you!!
                  Hey Old school was asking for some debate.....sooo....The weighted plank....not really seeing the point. You can increase its intensity by reducing stability. What I mean is turn it into a three point or two point plank. Take that a step further with bosu ball or elevating the legs onto a bench. While we make fun of these things as a mishap of "functional" training you have to understand when they are actually of use. Like in this particular case...why are you performing a plank? The muscles we are working are those of stability and endurance. I see Laz is using it for power lifting...but I would venture that the time taken for "loading" makes the determining factor muscle endurance rather than power. As such why not just destabilize the standard plank to the point in which you reach failure somewhere in the 60-120 second range? I can make some good argument for loading the glute/ham raises, hanging curls, and especially some weighted hip thrusters....but planks? Meh, I think its a tool for a certain type of work...and I don't think max loading is it.
                  Last edited by Neckhammer; 12-16-2013, 10:07 PM.

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                  • #39
                    So there ya go. A new point of debate. Can you think of particular exercises that are ill equipped to be performed in the standard "strength" rep ranges. Which ones benefit from a change in our standard approach?

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                      So there ya go. A new point of debate. Can you think of particular exercises that are ill equipped to be performed in the standard "strength" rep ranges. Which ones benefit from a change in our standard approach?
                      Forearms seem like one such body part to me, we are using them constantly so the standard heavy weight low-ish reps don't seem to cause much stimulus !

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                        So there ya go. A new point of debate. Can you think of particular exercises that are ill equipped to be performed in the standard "strength" rep ranges. Which ones benefit from a change in our standard approach?
                        forearms and calves are the 2 that jump right out to me. if you think about it, we perform thousands of calf raises every day with our own bodyweight. they need far different strategies to shock in to growing

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                          So there ya go. A new point of debate. Can you think of particular exercises that are ill equipped to be performed in the standard "strength" rep ranges. Which ones benefit from a change in our standard approach?
                          Biceps curls, LTE's, good mornings, and anything else that requires you to create a moment arm as a necessary part of loading the exercise. Because the heavier they get, the more you'll cheat and defeat the purpose.
                          The Champagne of Beards

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                          • #43
                            Have you ever tried push ups using intentions ?
                            Linkie for the explanation? Can't find immediately apparent explanation on the web.
                            My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                            When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by gergirl View Post
                              Aren't you guys training flexibilty at all? Stretches? Yoga? What about the saying that you'll get stiff and less flexible over time? wouldn't want to miss my stretching and Yoga Is it just a girls thing??
                              I have been doing 15 minutes of yoga every morning for many years, so not just a girls thing. I do it to keep my low back from re-injury, and to keep my muscles from shortening as I've aged (I'm 60 yo). In particular the hamstrings are difficult to keep loose without stretching, particularly if you run regularly.

                              I also do some abs work as part of my morning yoga (boat pose). I hold this for roughly two minutes while I do feet/toe exercises.

                              The most important part of my morning yoga is a half-dozen or so solar salutations. Thousands of years of yoga practice have determined that this is a great way to warm up in the morning, and it works for me.
                              Click here for my hiking and backpacking Youtube Channel

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Leida View Post
                                Linkie for the explanation? Can't find immediately apparent explanation on the web.

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