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  • #16
    Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
    People who like stretching for its own sake are a rare breed indeed.
    ater a long day at work or a good workout...helps me to calm down and I do a different kind of stretching, which makes me feel relaxed and activated at the same time. Just a few exercises to fininsh workout and makes it feel complete.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by gergirl View Post
      Know this points of discussion..but Yoga and stretching are about breathing, too. And breathing conciously is important for lifting, too.Isn't it? My Yoga isn't really static, it's a more dynamic flow.
      I'm off from acertain programme, too. Right now I feel more motivated to switch between exercises and the kinds of workout. It's more like cycling the body parts and exercises on aregular basis during the week than having a real plan of how much weight and reps...I'm just not the programme type when it comes to training.
      Well yoga as a dynamic flow and with specific cues to breath is meditation in motion and much more akin to dynamic stretching than the static stretch sect. Your original question though eluded to becoming stiff if you don't "stretch" and I find that highly unlikely when utilizing full ROM lifts like deep squats, overhead press, chins, rows, lunges, ect.....

      I think the benefits found in yoga are real, and are really more closely related to both its meditative value and by virtue of creating strength in an elongated state. This sort of strength is also necessary for stability. So yes yoga as isometric work, balance, and meditation is an excellent adjunct to any program IMO. Just pointing out that it isn't the "stretch" part that is all that beneficial.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by gergirl View Post
        Aren't you guys training flexibilty at all? Stretches? Yoga? What about the saying that you'll get stiff and less flexible over time?
        wouldn't want to miss my stretching and Yoga Is it just a girls thing??
        I decided I'm going to learn how to use Indian Clubs to help with mobility, stretches and grip strength. I also do full body mobility (pre) and full body stretches (post) every time I work out. I would love to do more yoga but time is short unfortunately. Since I've incorporated mobility and stretches I've never felt better! This old body gets its share of aches and pains.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by MaceyUK View Post
          I haven't really trained abs much as I think they kind of get worked but as an experiment I have been trying this T NATION | Heavy Ab Training as seen in the second clip. It's hard work but am I wasting my time? I have just started 1st cycle of 5/3/1 with BBB for assistance.
          I would REALLY love people's thoughts on isolated ab exercises. Meaning, intentionally working the abs separately from the work they get in compound exercises. I'm new to powerlifting and work with a trainer. We do an ab accessory exercise probably about once a week. But I'm recently coming from a CW place where in the past I worked my abs at the end of every group fitness class or regularly on my own. I wouldn't say I feel like they look/feel any differently either way (still have weight to lose to expose the six pack!). Its just hard to re-train my mind to believe that the compound exercises are all I need for my abs. Or that once a week is good enough. Is that even true? Thoughts?

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          • #20
            It's just a matter of priorities. If strength is what is important to you, you do powerlifting, and you prioritize that, using other types of exercise to enhance it (or at least not work against it).

            If you decide you want to prioritize stretching and see what you can achieve, the place to ask for help is not on a forum where no one has ever heard of stretching for its own sake and they definitely don't approve.

            The key word here is "contortionism". Look it up and find a coach in your area to help you with it.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by gergirl View Post
              I HATE the leg press! How can anyone punish ones knees in that way????
              Best exercise for shoulders, arms and many more muscles: dive bombers! I'm dying doing them!
              I really like the leg press as it offers the ability to not only alter foot width but also foot position in relation to the centerline of your body. Placing your feet lower down on the footplate will hit more quad and less glute whereas placing them high on the platform hits more glute and less quad. I think if they are hurting your knees then either the weight is too heavy or your foot placement needs some adjusting. In saying that there are obviously some leg press machines that are better designed than others.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by gergirl View Post
                Aren't you guys training flexibilty at all? Stretches? Yoga? What about the saying that you'll get stiff and less flexible over time?
                wouldn't want to miss my stretching and Yoga Is it just a girls thing??
                Providing you are performing your exercises through a full range of motion there shouldn't be any need for additional stretching.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by MaceyUK View Post
                  I haven't really trained abs much as I think they kind of get worked but as an experiment I have been trying this T NATION | Heavy Ab Training as seen in the second clip. It's hard work but am I wasting my time? I have just started 1st cycle of 5/3/1 with BBB for assistance.
                  That's a good article, thanks for the link.

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                  • #24
                    My PT is training me on the leg press machine (one legged presses) to fix the knee stability and even out the strength of 2 legs.

                    The group that loves stretching are martial artists - that's the longest stretches and warm-ups I have seen...

                    Folks, any ideas on what I can add with a non-weight bearing leg? I fractured a little toe, and I am looking at 4 weeks recovery so far no weight on the foot is allowed. I did a punching workout with a leg propped on a chair, and I can see push-ups off the knees happening, plus I did a quadruped stretch. I can't drive, so gym is out.
                    My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                    When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Leida View Post
                      My PT is training me on the leg press machine (one legged presses) to fix the knee stability and even out the strength of 2 legs.

                      The group that loves stretching are martial artists - that's the longest stretches and warm-ups I have seen...

                      Folks, any ideas on what I can add with a non-weight bearing leg? I fractured a little toe, and I am looking at 4 weeks recovery so far no weight on the foot is allowed. I did a punching workout with a leg propped on a chair, and I can see push-ups off the knees happening, plus I did a quadruped stretch. I can't drive, so gym is out.
                      What equipment do you have available, any ?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by edennperez1 View Post
                        I would REALLY love people's thoughts on isolated ab exercises. Meaning, intentionally working the abs separately from the work they get in compound exercises. I'm new to powerlifting and work with a trainer. We do an ab accessory exercise probably about once a week. But I'm recently coming from a CW place where in the past I worked my abs at the end of every group fitness class or regularly on my own. I wouldn't say I feel like they look/feel any differently either way (still have weight to lose to expose the six pack!). Its just hard to re-train my mind to believe that the compound exercises are all I need for my abs. Or that once a week is good enough. Is that even true? Thoughts?
                        My only ab specific work is hanging leg raises, or in my case, hanging knee raises. Hang from the pull up bar and lift your knees to your chest. The goal is to get your toes up to the chin bar. I do them to help with my main lifts rather than the other way around.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by clevinger View Post
                          My only ab specific work is hanging leg raises, or in my case, hanging knee raises. Hang from the pull up bar and lift your knees to your chest. The goal is to get your toes up to the chin bar. I do them to help with my main lifts rather than the other way around.
                          The only effective part is the pelvic tilt.

                          LOWER ABS and the Loch Ness Monster | Doug Brignole - Exercise and Biomechanics

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by edennperez1 View Post
                            I would REALLY love people's thoughts on isolated ab exercises. Meaning, intentionally working the abs separately from the work they get in compound exercises. I'm new to powerlifting and work with a trainer. We do an ab accessory exercise probably about once a week. But I'm recently coming from a CW place where in the past I worked my abs at the end of every group fitness class or regularly on my own. I wouldn't say I feel like they look/feel any differently either way (still have weight to lose to expose the six pack!). Its just hard to re-train my mind to believe that the compound exercises are all I need for my abs. Or that once a week is good enough. Is that even true? Thoughts?
                            I do some powerlifting (not a USAW member anything, but consistent locally) and I have a pretty defined stomach, so I will try to throw in here:
                            -- It is NOT true that compounds are all you need to have the proper core strength, if you are a novice. In this case, especially if one is coming from machine training, it is common for there to be crazy imbalances in the chest and quads....in other words, your limiting factor in your 1RM of say a clean is your back, not your leg drive. The same holds true for squats and deads, in that if you are starting out you need to focus on the core a little more to get it up to par.
                            -- Once that level is achieved though, where the core is not limiting the lifts, it is pretty safe to just use the compounds to a point....I have found that for myself, I was limited on the my snatch weight by my posterior chain once I built the weight up enough. My leg drive is never the problem, so if this is you as well, building up the core is the way.
                            -- With the above said, a lot of the conventional ways of doing core are not sufficient for the loads involved in oly lifting. Things like crunches or ab machines are never going to get your core ready for a 500+lb deadlift. I use only 3 exercises for my core, but all 3 are very stressful: 1) gravity boots with kettleball 2) Weighted glute-ham raises 3) weighted planks

                            On the planks, you will likely need a helper. You get into a normal plank, then slowly have weight added onto your back. I have gotten up to 180lbs for a 5 second hold.....this will simulate the short bursts needed for a really heavy pull.

                            @ EKath

                            You do understand that almost any competitive powerlifter is EXTREMELY flexible, correct? The real reason why most guys that are really strong cannot do heavy oly lifts is NOT strength, it is flexibility. Same goes for a lot of high-level athletes....For example, it has been said that a lot of NHL hockey players, at least the smaller goal-scorers, are usually more flexible than a competitive figure skater.

                            Almost all application of force, whether in sports or oly lifting, relies on flexibility. This is why most athletic guys are incredibly flexible....I feel like you have this image of a slow, lumbering meathead carrying boulders around; when in reality a lot of powerlifters and elite athletes can do the splits, and one guy I know (he has set the record at my gym for power snatch) can lock his knees and put his ELBOWS to the ground. He is 6 foot 4 and 245. That is hard
                            "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

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                            • #29
                              I did squats yesterday went up a weight and i can feel my top 2 abs this morning. The only stretching i do is during my gym session, i do squats and just sit there to feel the stretch in the lower back, and i try walk around a fair bit to loosen everything up. I also do no ab work so i hope to get some definition just doing compounds.

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                              • #30
                                I don't think the breathing for powerlifting is all that terribly complicated that you need any kind of yoga training for it. You're mostly NOT breathing while you're lifting anyway. You're holding your breath most of the time.

                                I don't know about men, but women tend to have enough natural flexibility for weight lifting. Often they have too much flexibility rather than not enough.

                                After I burn 600 calories on the stairmaster I like to do 100 crunches for my abs. I usually get enough of a bicep workout curling my little purse doggie.
                                Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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