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  • #16
    Can't offer much of a solution as I am in the same boat, so I am glad to read this thread. I'm 47 and almost anywhere I go, there are virtually NO women deadlifting. I have been for 2 years now. I also applaud any woman doing a 1RM of 260, if that's middle of the road, I am missing the boat! I too have injured myself in kind of the same way as you describe SB. Six months ago, I had a 1RM of 225 and had a top set that had climbed to 205x4. Then something tweaked, and I had to really scale way back for quite awhile. Cut to the present... I steadily worked my way back carefully to 185x5 for top set last week, and on my last set at 165, rep 5 (I had done 10 the week before) something tweaked and that was it, but luckily I stopped in time, don't think I have to back track too much. I will say though, one of the things that I noticed the last 8 weeks that DID increase my strength and got me back to 185, was not cutting calories. Whenever I have been trying to cut, no real gains. I have been on an "accidental" bulk and I swear, I have made progress, felt like a beast, and recovered faster... despite the small bump last week (and the extra padding around the hips). I also agree with eKatherine completely. This stuff is for life, so if progress takes longer in order to stay injury free, and there are some setbacks or plateaus, just keep going, what's the rush. Stay safe and know that we are likely stronger than a lot of women in our age groups already
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    • #17
      Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
      Please understand that I am not having difficulty doing a deadlift. My entire experience with Starting Strength and lifting in general has been that something was missing about it for me. Recently I started doing Texas method and it has been like a miracle. It feels like I'm finally doing something that gives me real strength and real progress.

      I feel with the deadlift, since it does not follow the TM model, that I'm experiencing what I have always had, which I can only describe as a sort of false progress. Yes, I can add more to the bar but as I get closer and closer to some limit it simply gets very hard until I get to a point where it is just too hard and I cannot do it. The volume squats have shown me that it's actually possible to get stronger and it has shown me how different that feels from this false progress.

      Looking around the gym it appears that a lot of other people do high volume deadlifts, so why not me? Seaweed and Magnolia do lots of volume and variations, so why not me? You really can't argue with their success. Maybe it works better for women to work more than one pathway toward strength and muscle.

      I think I will give it a try and see how it goes.
      When your skin is exposed to a short hard bout of friction the adaptation is in the form of a callus. If the friction is not of a high enough intensity it will give no need for adaptation regardless of how long the friction is applied for. Likewise once the skin is exposed to sufficient stimuli then any further stimuli is wasted effort.......shooting a dead man won't make him any more dead.
      The same is true for muscular size and strength, always seek to make it harder and briefer.......increasing the volume is definitely not the optimal way to go about getting the results you seek.
      Last edited by OldSchhool; 11-26-2013, 02:42 PM.

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      • #18
        The folks who've suggested partials are actually on to something great there in the instance of plateaus. While I haven't used rack pulls yet in my own lifting (progressive loading has me still seeing gains, so I've not felt the need to implement it yet), I have had excellent success using floor presses and partials to bust through a niggling bench press plateau, and also had great success with focus on eccentric negative "pull ups" (more like really slow hang downs in effect) for back strength.

        Without having the time to watch you, break down your form and see what's happening with the mechanics of the lift or analyse your diet, it's very hard to say why you're at a plateau. You simply might not be taking in enough calories or raw protein to build the muscle to increase your lifts in spite of hard work and perfect form. If your nutrition is bang on and your form is too, developing the right kind of fast twitch muscle fibres through partials might be the solution. Conversely, there may be one little niggle in your form that, once rectified, has you busting through plateaus.

        If you've had a back injury from a dead lift, I'd be personally inclined to say you've distance the bar too far from your body (it should be straight over your bootlaces at the start of each lift) and thus rounded your back a little, perhaps not opened your chest up enough. That is pure hack guesswork though - it could be the injury was caused by wear and tear from other activities and just "popped" at bad timing while you were under load.

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        • #19
          Disclaimer: I have not read every post on this thread, so I may restate something or misconstrue something.

          First, it sounds like you are a novice, no offense, so why are you using Texas Method squats? You would be better served by just using a normal linear progression.

          Second, through my skimming it seemed that someone may have suggested block work, could be wrong. I think that would be a mistake. It seems that you have already hurt your back twice, so I think increase the range of motion would also increase the likelihood of you getting hurt. Also that is a more advanced technique. Advanced techniques might look cool, but they should be left to the advanced.

          Third, a single 5 rep working set is ideal for beginners. High reps increases the chance of form degradation and may just ingrain bad habits.

          Reset at 135, make sure you form is locked in, eat right, sleep, and make steady reasonable jumps.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by caveBEE View Post
            I will say though, one of the things that I noticed the last 8 weeks that DID increase my strength and got me back to 185, was not cutting calories. Whenever I have been trying to cut, no real gains. I have been on an "accidental" bulk and I swear, I have made progress, felt like a beast, and recovered faster... despite the small bump last week (and the extra padding around the hips). I also agree with eKatherine completely. This stuff is for life, so if progress takes longer in order to stay injury free, and there are some setbacks or plateaus, just keep going, what's the rush. Stay safe and know that we are likely stronger than a lot of women in our age groups already
            Me too on the calories. I have been eating like a whale, almost force-feeding at times. It has helped a lot, although I have to say I don't look as good as my little avatar picture anymore. I truly think the volume I get on texas method has helped, too. It's not that I've been on a plateau so much as it has never felt like the strength I built was persistent or lasting. I don't mind if I have to do 80% volume one week and then do my 5-rep max the following week and work up 2.5lbs at a time. If it works and I can make consistent progress, I will be happy.

            I only deadlift 160 at the moment. 260 seems incredible to me. I can't even envision what Magnolia can do.

            P.S. I'm not a beginner. Although my results are not impressive, they're not bad for 48 year old woman with no prior lifting experience who has been lifting regularly for a year.

            According to Exrx.net (bold is where I'm at):

            Lift Body Weight Untrained Novice Intermediate Advanced Elite
            Squat 132 60 110 130 170 210
            Deadlift 132 75 135 160 220 275
            Last edited by sbhikes; 11-26-2013, 03:50 PM.
            Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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            • #21
              I wouldn't worry too much about the absolute numbers or what other folks are lifting. They're nice for an academic idea of things and it's natural to want to compare yourself to others to get an idea of where you stand, but at the end of the day lifting is an intensely personal pursuit.

              For a year's worth of training and no prior lifting, 5 reps at 120% of your bodyweight isn't at all shabby. Using others as an example is a good thing when it motivates you to go to that next level and shows you what can be achieved, but not so great if you start feeling down on your own progress, and the squat results in your signature show that your progress so far has been pretty durned good.

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              • #22
                Well to the OP, I do offer a bit of an apology. I didn't realize you were a 48 year old woman. Nor was I aware of your body weight. My advice remains unchanged. Good luck whatever you decide to do.

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                • #23
                  I only deadlift 160 at the moment. 260 seems incredible to me. I can't even envision what Magnolia can do.
                  I would not compare yourself to other people. Yes, you've been lifting for a year, without a coach, and with 2 back injuries. Deadlifts are hard. Trust me, 160 on the bar is not exactly a small amount of weight for a 135 lb. woman. Load 160 on a bar, and I'll be feeling it soon enough. TRUST ME.

                  I weigh 35lbs more than you, and I work with a coach. Everytime I deadlift, there is a winning powerlifter watching my form and giving me pointers. He gives us targeted exercises to improve our lifts. It's a lot different than having a written program you follow on your own. I can honestly say that if I did not have a coach watching me, my deadlift would be closer to 200lbs because pulling my 1 RM never feels like a good idea- I literally get lightheaded and see stars. It takes a lot of effort and strain to get that weight off the ground. It's not something I would do without a professional there letting me know my form was working.

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                  • #24
                    Yeah, I wouldn't even attempt it if I thought I would pass out. Probably not even with a coach. I'm willing to take more risks with squats. Oh, and the numbers I quote for myself are 5 reps, basically what I'm working on now, not 1 rep maxes.
                    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                    • #25
                      Oh, so your 5 rep max is 160.... Your 1 RM would be higher.

                      http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
                      Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

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                      • #26
                        Hi! Congrats on your progress so far, very impressive! Compared to average people you're quite buff

                        If you need something to try - deadlift once every 5-7 days, do five sets of five with one minute rests. Start at 135 lbs and increase 10 lb each time you got all reps the last workout. If you don't get every rep in a workout, just stay at that weight. If you really plateau, increase the rest to 3 min, then 2 the next week at the same weight, then 1 min rests, then increase the weight the next workout.

                        Happy lifting!

                        Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by I_EAT_COWS View Post
                          If you need something to try - deadlift once every 5-7 days, do five sets of five with one minute rests. Start at 135 lbs and increase 10 lb each time you got all reps the last workout. If you don't get every rep in a workout, just stay at that weight. If you really plateau, increase the rest to 3 min, then 2 the next week at the same weight, then 1 min rests, then increase the weight the next workout.
                          5 sets of 5 deadlifts with 1 minute rests? Are we talking about the same lift here?

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by quikky View Post
                            5 sets of 5 deadlifts with 1 minute rests? Are we talking about the same lift here?
                            Are you saying that bc you've tried it and proved it was useless, or is that CW talking? it's just something different to break a plateau - no harm if starting light and keeping good form. It's good to try new things sometimes, wink wink nudge nudge.

                            Pavel suggests longer rests in this program, another good approach: http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog...to-your-lifts/


                            Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
                            Last edited by I_EAT_COWS; 11-28-2013, 12:13 AM.

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                            • #29
                              I'm an older woman, and 1 minute breaks sound way short for anyone without perfect recovery.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by I_EAT_COWS View Post
                                Hi! Congrats on your progress so far, very impressive! Compared to average people you're quite buff

                                If you need something to try - deadlift once every 5-7 days, do five sets of five with one minute rests. Start at 135 lbs and increase 10 lb each time you got all reps the last workout. If you don't get every rep in a workout, just stay at that weight. If you really plateau, increase the rest to 3 min, then 2 the next week at the same weight, then 1 min rests, then increase the weight the next workout.

                                Happy lifting!

                                Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
                                Ha ha ha ha ha I am laughing because you do not realize you are speaking to a 48-year-old woman. 10lbs a week! 1 minute rest!
                                Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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