Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rhabdomyolysis: How I almost died from being pushed to do too many pull-ups

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rhabdomyolysis: How I almost died from being pushed to do too many pull-ups

    Folks, this is no joke. I'm a 37 year old mother of 5 who was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis after my trainer had me do a ridiculous amount of reps of a ridiculous exercise. If you are unfamiliar with this illness or work with a trainer, please take a moment to read my story and share it with your friends and family.

    The Real Housewife of Bluemont: Mom of 5 Almost Dies From Pull-ups ~ My Story on Trainers, Rhabdomyolysis and Following Your Instincts

  • #2
    Why did that exercise ever make sense to you ? Eccentric training is an advanced technique, great to finish off a set of strict regular pull ups but to jump up as you were doing for multiple reps ??!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Wow, that's quite a story. I train myself and the most jumping/negative pullups I've ever done in a day is 5 and at first these absolutely wrecked me. They were probably one of the most strenuous things I have ever done.
      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by OldSchhool View Post
        Why did that exercise ever make sense to you ? Eccentric training is an advanced technique, great to finish off a set of strict regular pull ups but to jump up as you were doing for multiple reps ??!!
        Obviously, it made no sense to me. I'm not a trainer. I paid my trainer good money to be knowledgeable enough to direct my training. If you took the time to read the post, you would see that I have been seeing him for quite some time and trusted both him (and the gym).

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
          Wow, that's quite a story. I train myself and the most jumping/negative pullups I've ever done in a day is 5 and at first these absolutely wrecked me. They were probably one of the most strenuous things I have ever done.
          That's what I've been hearing from a lot of people. The load he had me to was outrageous. And reckless.

          Comment


          • #6
            I guess it could have happened doing any strenuous workout though, if it hadn't happened there it could have been during a tough Cross-fit session or a grueling set of squats etc. It sucks but I guess we often don't realize what's in store for us till it's too late.

            Comment


            • #7
              Absolutely. I got a local news crew to cover the story. It's just so important to understand that seeing a trainer your dangers are not just pulled hammies and torn ligaments. Had I have ever heard of rhabdo before this I would have told my trainer to take a hike. Knowledge is power. Gyms need to be educating their trainers AND their clients on this. I'm stunned by how many stories I've heard similar to mine since I wrote this blog post.

              Comment


              • #8
                Very similar thing happened to another woman only a year older than yourself, pull ups as well, weird !

                The “Killer Workout” That Almost Killed Me - Gate House
                Last edited by OldSchhool; 10-14-2013, 04:29 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  This is what happens when people judge a workout by how much it hurts. How many times have you heard crap like "that was an awesome workout, I'm so sore now!", or "that's a great way to hit your thighs - it really burns". Personally, and I might just be old-fashioned, but I judge a workout not by pain/soreness/burning but by results.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by quikky View Post
                    This is what happens when people judge a workout by how much it hurts. How many times have you heard crap like "that was an awesome workout, I'm so sore now!", or "that's a great way to hit your thighs - it really burns". Personally, and I might just be old-fashioned, but I judge a workout not by pain/soreness/burning but by results.
                    You are totally right but I still feel like I've not had a good workout unless I'm sore the next day.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by OldSchhool View Post
                      You are totally right but I still feel like I've not had a good workout unless I'm sore the next day.
                      That's reasonable for you. You train with bodybuilding parameters (many reps, long time under tension, all that other jazz).
                      In matters of style, swim with the current. In matters of principle, stand like a rock.

                      This message has been intercepted by the NSA, the only branch of government that listens.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Holy crap. That kindda stuff makes me mad. If the OP did 5 or 10, she would have been appropriately challenged and would have had a great workout. But being pushed 'past the pain' inflicted a huge damage to her body. The exercise is fine, it's the concept of overtraining that is not. It seems to have originally come from the desire to get to the gym for min amount of time and martyr oneself to avoid doing it regularly and with joy or something. Stuff like Insanity and Biggest Looser promote this unhealthy outlook on fitness. Shame on the PT!
                        My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                        When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Is it because they were negatives? When I reach failure I reach FAILURE - there's just no way I'm getting the weight up, no matter how hard I push, even if I was willing to damage myself. I know injuries happen but this is pretty extreme. How can this be avoided while still pushing yourself to where you force your body to adapt? Why haven't I heard of this more often on bodybuilding forums?
                          Starting DL: 135 Now: 380
                          Starting Bench: 115 Now: 255
                          Goal: Get stronger.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Cavewizard View Post
                            Is it because they were negatives? When I reach failure I reach FAILURE - there's just no way I'm getting the weight up, no matter how hard I push, even if I was willing to damage myself. I know injuries happen but this is pretty extreme. How can this be avoided while still pushing yourself to where you force your body to adapt? Why haven't I heard of this more often on bodybuilding forums?
                            Well, negatives (eccentric-only) fail long after concentric work has already failed. They're useful to increase volume when one can no longer perform a concentric repetition. Rhabdomyolysis just isn't that common, even amongst people who work really hard.
                            The Champagne of Beards

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Wow, glad it turned out ok for you. Was this Gold's located in Leesburg by any chance?

                              On another note, I love your little town, went there a couple weekends ago for the fair, and go once every so often for the winery.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X