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Heavy Lifting made me bigger

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  • #16
    Originally posted by OldSchhool View Post
    Wow I wish I could get big so fast !!!!

    I really don't think muscle is an issue on men or women providing you think about it like a sculptor would as he creates his art. This is why I'm not sold on the ' You must do squats, bench press and deadlifts' mentality.

    For example adding a little side delt size will make the waist look much smaller. Build a nice thigh sweep, rounded glutes, tight oblique's, nicely shaped calves. Decide the shape you want and then custom your routine with that goal in mind.
    Now this sounds totally intriguing. Is it really possible to be that specific about it? Are there sample body pix to go by with routines to match?

    Originally posted by Ghshl View Post
    That was the first thing that struck me. If you want to be strong, not big, you might want to follow a strength routine, instead of a mass increasing routine.

    Sent from my GT-I9300
    So what IS the difference between a strength and mass-increasing routine. I would have thought that building mass was building strength. Is this not necessarily so? And is it possible to build strength without building mass?
    Annie Ups the Ante
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Annieh View Post
      So what IS the difference between a strength and mass-increasing routine. I would have thought that building mass was building strength. Is this not necessarily so? And is it possible to build strength without building mass?
      Look at a gymnast.... they are not massive folks, but are increadibly strong. Just think about the strength required do go from a sitting "L" hold to a handstand..... or to hold an Iron Cross on the rings. So, yes you can be increadibly strong and not be massive.

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      • #18
        Strength and size are not mutually exclusive, so you'll get a bit of both no matter what you do.
        If your main goal is strength, use a weight you can do 1-5 reps. For size, you want a weight you can take for many reps, and do many sets of that.

        For a beginner wanting strength, I would do Starting Strength, but eat close to maintenance, instead of in a major surplus. You'll plateau sooner if you're not eating in a surplus, but you won't become massive so I'd consider that good for you.

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        • #19
          I totally didn't realize that what I was doing was a bodybuilding type routine. I always thought that higher reps meant less size. I think I got that from P90x when they say for women to lean out to do 12-15 reps. Is this just flat out wrong? I should be doing very few reps??

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          • #20
            Originally posted by FireFinder View Post
            I always thought that higher reps meant less size. I think I got that from P90x when they say for women to lean out to do 12-15 reps. Is this just flat out wrong? I should be doing very few reps??
            Rep Out: The Truth About Rep Ranges And Muscle Growth | Muscle & Strength
            The Champagne of Beards

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            • #21
              Honestly.... I would not mind getting bigger with muscle. I think it's not how small you are, but your shape and tonedness that makes you look good. I've put on a few lbs, clothes sizes have gone down. Overall my body looks more feminine now because the broader shoulders and bigger butt make my waist look smaller. However, if your thighs get at all bigger, buying pants is a bitch.

              http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
              Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

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              • #22
                It might vary from person to person with the same lifting routine based on existing body types. When I was lifting heavy things, my legs got much bigger but more defined. Therefore, even though my pants were tighter I looked better in them. I have a petite upper body, so my back/arms/shoulders became very defined but not much larger.

                Enjoy it! If you don't like how muscular you are becoming, then maybe trade your gym lifting routine for every day life work outs like hiking and chopping wood. Do yoga?
                sigpic
                Age 48
                Start date: 7-5-12
                5'3"
                121lbs
                GOAL: to live to be a healthy and active 100


                "In health there is freedom. Health is the first of all liberties."
                Henri Frederic Amiel

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by FireFinder View Post
                  I have been lifting 2-3 times a week. 8-10 reps, usually 2-3 sets of 3 diff movements per muscle group. I often will do a circuit type routine so I keep moving. I think I just have the propensity to build muscle easily..... I like to be strong, but I want to be smaller....
                  You are performing too many reps. And if you are doing a circuit you are not taking enough rest and therefore can not be "lifting heavy" enough. Your rep range is closer to that for hypertrophy. You want to be in the 4-6 rep range, for the true definition of lifting heavy, to increase strength and not size.

                  I did strong lifts a few years ago and only got stronger and leaner, no increase in size. I am female. Look up Starting Strength or Strong Lifts.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Andria View Post
                    You are performing too many reps. And if you are doing a circuit you are not taking enough rest and therefore can not be "lifting heavy" enough. Your rep range is closer to that for hypertrophy. You want to be in the 4-6 rep range, for the true definition of lifting heavy, to increase strength and not size.

                    I did strong lifts a few years ago and only got stronger and leaner, no increase in size. I am female. Look up Starting Strength or Strong Lifts.
                    The rep range idea is just a myth !

                    The Myth of Non-Functional Hypertrophy

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                    • #25
                      Sometimes what your mind wants and your body wants do not match. If you are adding muscle, that is a good thing and many will be jealous. Adding true muscle is damn tough.

                      The best measure I know is whether you are getting stronger. I prefer to use Mike Mentzer/Author Jones logic, muscles are either activated or not. When working out the only way to add strength is more muscle fiber. If you are stronger, you are gaining muscle.

                      My question would be why do you you want to be a certain size? Does it really matter? A well muscled body will look better in ANYTHING than a smaller non-muscled body. Maybe your genetics are pre-disposed to being muscular, go with it. You may find you and your significant other enjoy it!




                      Originally posted by FireFinder View Post
                      I am female- starting lifting heav(ier) a few months ago and cut back on the cardio and I've noticed that I'm bigger. Meaning, my arms, chest, legs and back have larger muscles (tshirts and jeans are more snug). I don't think it's fat b/c I have decent definition. But I don't want to be bigger! I want to be leaner, and smaller.

                      So what do I do? Get on the stair machine and treadmill for hard intervals? Increase reps/decrease weight? Any other ladies see this happening?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by RMF5630 View Post
                        Sometimes what your mind wants and your body wants do not match. If you are adding muscle, that is a good thing and many will be jealous. Adding true muscle is damn tough.

                        The best measure I know is whether you are getting stronger. I prefer to use Mike Mentzer/Author Jones logic, muscles are either activated or not. When working out the only way to add strength is more muscle fiber. If you are stronger, you are gaining muscle.
                        Yes, more contractible protein shuttled into the muscle fibers is the definition of getting stronger, but many people confuse getting stonger by lifting more in certain lifts! OK, very often you will get strength adaptions by lifting more, but far from always, and physiological strength adaptions will max out long before the lifting numbers stop to go up...

                        Here a relative tiny 130 pound guy squatting 603 pound or 4.5 times his bodyweight;

                        "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                        - Schopenhauer

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Annieh View Post
                          So what IS the difference between a strength and mass-increasing routine. I would have thought that building mass was building strength. Is this not necessarily so? And is it possible to build strength without building mass?
                          Muscles can grow by either adding more fibres (myofibrillated hypertrophy) or increasing the fluid inside the cells (sarcoplasmic hypertrophy). Both will increase mass, but only the former increases strength. The latter increases endurance and results in a lot more size. Any training program will increase both to some extent, but training at low rep ranges favours myofibrillated hypertrophy and 8-12 is optimal for sarcoplasmic hypertrophy.

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                          • #28
                            Lol gorbag.... that video is just great for so many reasons I can't even count.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Kinnell View Post
                              Muscles can grow by either adding more fibres (myofibrillated hypertrophy) or increasing the fluid inside the cells (sarcoplasmic hypertrophy). Both will increase mass, but only the former increases strength. The latter increases endurance and results in a lot more size. Any training program will increase both to some extent, but training at low rep ranges favours myofibrillated hypertrophy and 8-12 is optimal for sarcoplasmic hypertrophy.
                              This is a myth. Rep ranges cannot influence one type of growth over the other. The size of the sarcoplasm is limited by the size of the myofibrils. In other words, a cell can only hold so much sarcoplasm and that amount is limited by the size of the myofibril within it. Thus, it would seem it is impossible to increase sarcoplasmic growth in the absence of myofibrillar growth regardless of what strategies are employed.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by FireFinder View Post
                                I am female- starting lifting heav(ier) a few months ago and cut back on the cardio and I've noticed that I'm bigger. Meaning, my arms, chest, legs and back have larger muscles (tshirts and jeans are more snug). I don't think it's fat b/c I have decent definition. But I don't want to be bigger! I want to be leaner, and smaller.

                                So what do I do? Get on the stair machine and treadmill for hard intervals? Increase reps/decrease weight? Any other ladies see this happening?
                                What you can try is to do 2 sessions of sprints each week. Also, eat more protein and fewer carbs and fats and reduce your calories just a little bit. Not drastically because you still want to get stronger.

                                I have gotten bigger from lifting, too, but only in some places. Such as my shoulders. I have a tank top I wore on the Pacific Crest Trail. It's the red shirt in my avatar. It is tight on my belly when I get fat. Now it's tight on my shoulders and loose on my belly. My thighs are always big but now they are just shaped different and jiggle less. There's a bulge in the back along my hamstrings. You can really see it when I walk up the stairs or something like that. Everything that got bigger is shaped better so I'm not unhappy.
                                Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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