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Light Weights Are Just as Good for Building Muscle, Getting Stronger, Resea

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  • #16
    From my experience I think it depends on which muscle group you're working. The leg muscles are made for endurance compared to deltoids. I respond much better to 15-20 reps to failure on leg press and squats. On shoulder work, I respond better to lower reps (8-12).
    Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Scott F View Post
      From my experience I think it depends on which muscle group you're working. The leg muscles are made for endurance compared to deltoids. I respond much better to 15-20 reps to failure on leg press and squats. On shoulder work, I respond better to lower reps (8-12).
      How many reps do you think you can do at 80% of your 1RM? And how many at 30%?
      The Champagne of Beards

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      • #18
        If they were really pushing to momentary muscular failure for three sets then I'd suggest that the heavy group was probably over training doing 3 sessions per week anyway. That being the case had the heavy group just done one session per week they would likely have shown more hypertrophy than the light group.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
          Yeah, crap study. Basically it proves doing something is better than doing nothing.

          The whole point of the study is to show debilitated people that it is still beneficial to lift light weight if they ares afraid of the heavies.
          Gotta disagree with you on this one. Clarence Bass gives a much better review of the study.

          Light Weights Build Muscle

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Vick View Post
            Gotta disagree with you on this one. Clarence Bass gives a much better review of the study.

            Light Weights Build Muscle
            Well it seems I did actually misread this. When reading the OPs article I though that it stated 8-12 reps at the heaviest and 25-30 at the lightest and saw nothing to indicate going to "failure" in either. So yeah, I thought they were arbitrarily assigning rep ranges rather then relying on intensity and momentary muscle failure.

            So my comment now is that high or low is very dependent on your training goals.

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            • #21
              For general fitness goals various rep ranges from 5 reps and above is probably not a bad idea!

              T NATION | Light Weights for Big Gains

              More relevant stuff from Clarence Bass, effort is more important than heavy:

              Muscle Fibers and Weight training
              "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

              - Schopenhauer

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Gorbag View Post
                For general fitness goals various rep ranges from 5 reps and above is probably not a bad idea!

                T NATION | Light Weights for Big Gains

                More relevant stuff from Clarence Bass, effort is more important than heavy:

                Muscle Fibers and Weight training
                ... and another one from Clarence

                Weight Training With Effort - Many Ways

                Keep in simple. Hit failure on your last rep. Use weight and reps that are comfortable to you as an individual.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                  How many reps do you think you can do at 80% of your 1RM? And how many at 30%?
                  I'm saying my legs respond better by doing deep squats (or leg presses) for 15-20 reps. I think it's because the legs are more slow twitch endurance muscles overall. If I can do 20reps it's time to add weight. I pay little attention to 1RMs (esp for something like squats), back injury issues. These days I don't do much 1RM. With 33 years worth of weight training I can tell if the weight I'm using is heavy enough simply by feel/effort.

                  I got the idea to try 15-20 reps from Ellington Darden's High Intensity Bodybuilding book's recommendations. That was the best results I ever had putting size on my quad/hamstrings.
                  Last edited by Scott F; 09-09-2013, 07:54 PM.
                  Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Scott F View Post
                    I'm saying my legs respond better by doing deep squats (or leg presses) for 15-20 reps. I think it's because the legs are more slow twitch endurance muscles overall. If I can do 20reps it's time to add weight. I pay little attention to 1RMs (esp for something like squats), back injury issues. These days I don't do much 1RM. With 33 years worth of weight training I can tell if the weight I'm using is heavy enough simply by feel/effort.

                    I got the idea to try 15-20 reps from Ellington Darden's High Intensity Bodybuilding book's recommendations. That was the best results I ever had putting size on my quad/hamstrings.
                    Was that 1 set of 15 - 20 reps with the last one going to failure? Failure defined as very poor form or not able to complete the last rep.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Vick View Post
                      Was that 1 set of 15 - 20 reps with the last one going to failure? Failure defined as very poor form or not able to complete the last rep.
                      Two set of squats to failure. We (a friend of mine) spotted each other and used a squat rack's safety bars. I was in my late 20's at the time. I'm 56 now (time flies). This is the workout we used: http://www.amazon.com/High-Intensity.../dp/0399511032

                      That workout was full body 3 days per week. At the end of 6 weeks I had gained 14lbs (starting weight 202lb; ending 216lbs). I averaged about 2lbs gains per week. My friend gained more but he's taller. Neither of use ever used steroids, creatine wasn't invented yet, and we didn't eat a special diet. I remember all this because the gains were so impressive. Before then I wouldn't have thought anyone could put on 2lbs of muscle per week naturally. It's the body having to build the equivalent of two 16oz steaks each week.

                      However, that workout was too taxing. At the end of that workout we were shot in the ass fatigued and had to layoff. If I had to do it over I would maybe cut back to twice (maybe even once) per week on the workout. Or I'd schedual rest/recovery weeks every 3rd or 4th week (similar to P90X's break weeks).
                      Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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                      • #26
                        It does seem that higher reps could have benefits for us older folks. I've been doing 10x10 incline benches with light barbells while baby sitting a shoulder joint. I've actually been increasing strength while slowly healing my shoulder.

                        It seems that it might be best for older folks to to start with high reps and slowly decrease reps as joints get stronger. I know that my muscles were getting stronger faster than my joints when lifting heaver.

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                        • #27
                          Err is it just hypertropy or strength too? Sure your muscles may grow as much, but are they as strong afterwards? I just can't see lifting lots of reps at 30% of 1 RM being an effective way of building greater strength... You will probably just get better at lifting that particular weight!! I don't imagine your actual strength is going to significantly improve.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Scott F View Post
                            I'm saying my legs respond better by doing deep squats (or leg presses) for 15-20 reps. I think it's because the legs are more slow twitch endurance muscles overall. If I can do 20reps it's time to add weight. I pay little attention to 1RMs (esp for something like squats), back injury issues. These days I don't do much 1RM. With 33 years worth of weight training I can tell if the weight I'm using is heavy enough simply by feel/effort.

                            I got the idea to try 15-20 reps from Ellington Darden's High Intensity Bodybuilding book's recommendations. That was the best results I ever had putting size on my quad/hamstrings.
                            I followed what you said. I'm talking about relating it to the article. If you think about 30% of your estimated/projected 1RM, I bet you can rep it out way more than 15-20 times. In fact, if you really want to make yourself see stars and feel like you might hurl, you can probably rep out 70 or 75% of your 1RM for a set of 20.
                            The Champagne of Beards

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Iron Fireling View Post
                              Err is it just hypertropy or strength too? Sure your muscles may grow as much, but are they as strong afterwards? I just can't see lifting lots of reps at 30% of 1 RM being an effective way of building greater strength... You will probably just get better at lifting that particular weight!! I don't imagine your actual strength is going to significantly improve.
                              Real hypertrophy IS strength, the only way to become stronger in a physiological sense is to grow it! A more muscled up you is a stronger you, even if you could bench or squat more before becoming larger...
                              "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                              - Schopenhauer

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Gorbag View Post
                                Real hypertrophy IS strength, the only way to become stronger in a physiological sense is to grow it! A more muscled up you is a stronger you, even if you could bench or squat more before becoming larger...
                                You took too many crazy pills this morning, Uncle Gorbs.
                                The Champagne of Beards

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