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Does Anyone Actually Follow Mark's Blueprint?

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  • Does Anyone Actually Follow Mark's Blueprint?

    Hello all, first time poster here, thanks for any help in advance.

    Quick background: I must admit that I'm not paleo, but rather a raw vegan. While I do not subscribe to the primal diet, I was attracted to Mark's workout regimen as outlined in the Primal Fitness Blueprint. Years ago, I was a competitive runner, but I am a total newbie to any sort of muscular training and so I was drawn to its emphasis on functional fitness.

    As of a few weeks back, I began performing the 2x per week routine of squats/push-ups/planks/pulldowns as specifically outlined in the Blueprint. I am also incorporating sprints and low-intensity cardio as is recommended. The novelty of strength training results in a much more enjoyable and rewarding experience than the steady-state cardio that I had been accustomed to in my running days.

    To the point, then, I am committed to increasing my strength and/or muscular endurance (don't fully understand the difference yet). It follows that I'll need a regimen for the long-term. I was satisfied by both the idea of the Primal Fitness Blueprint, with its emphasis on bodyweight exercises and incremental gains, and its actual application. Upon visiting this very forum, though, I am having trouble finding any discussions as to the actual Blueprint; everyone seems to be on their own routines.

    Have you all graduated from the program?

    In sum, I'm trying to figure out a routine to implement. Mark's Primal Fitness Blueprint is ideal for me in that it emphasizes bodyweight to begin with, and is clearly structured and organized. I am put-off by the fact that no one here seems to adhere to the regimen, though. I don't want to squander the window of initial gains - should I look elsewhere?

    Thanks again.

  • #2
    Primal Blueprint Fitness is fine for overall fitness/health. Some of us here care a lot about getting as strong as possible within certain constraints, for which it's probably not optimal. If you're doing nothing now, stop letting the perfect be the enemy of the good. If you have access to the PBF Materials, start tomorrow. Tomorrow. No excuses. Go.
    The Champagne of Beards

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    • #3
      I followed it pretty closely for a year, made some good gains. Then Convict Conditioning for about six months. Additional gains. Then under a barbell following Starting Strength. All of this was my first foray into strength after years of running. All have helped strength and body comp. The switching around was more to stage off boredom and try new approaches. Of all of them, I found getting under the bar to bring the fastest gains.

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      • #4
        Yes, I follow it completely.
        "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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        • #5
          I follow its principles if not the actual detailed program. He says to move often at a slow pace, lift heavy things, and sprint now and then. So I take walks or hike most days, lift weights 2 or 3 times a week, and sprint 1 or 2 times a week. I have found it's enough to keep me in shape for super strenuous backpack trips. 20 miles in one day is not a problem.

          Opposite most people, I thought lifting weights would be easier to start with than doing bodyweight exercises. I really couldn't do most of the basic bodyweight exercises. I started with a class that had us doing them but I felt so uncoordinated and even after almost a year of the class I felt I had made little progress. So I switched to barbells. It seemed simpler (load barbell, do lift, load more plates, do more lifts = less complicated than turn your body into a pretzel and hold it in mid air somehow) and I saw dramatic progress quickly so it was kind of addictive. From lifting weights I can do 10 or more real pushups in multiple sets (with rest in between) without having tried to program pushups.

          I may switch all my upper body work from weights to pushups, pullups and dips. Unfortunately there is nothing to replace squats or deadlifts with barbells. I will keep squatting. I don't know about deadlifting. Too dangerous for uncoordinated idiots like me.
          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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          • #6
            Lots of slow moving, lift heavy things, and sprint. I follow that, in my own way.

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            • #7
              Sort of. But less plant, more animal, higher fat.
              Crohn's, doing SCD

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              • #8
                Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                I follow its principles if not the actual detailed program. He says to move often at a slow pace, lift heavy things, and sprint now and then. So I take walks or hike most days, lift weights 2 or 3 times a week, and sprint 1 or 2 times a week. I have found it's enough to keep me in shape for super strenuous backpack trips. 20 miles in one day is not a problem.
                This. The general guidelines will work fine for just about everybody that wants to be physically fit. It's up to the individual to decide the specifics (what kind of lifting exercises, how much to walk, etc).
                In matters of style, swim with the current. In matters of principle, stand like a rock.

                This message has been intercepted by the NSA, the only branch of government that listens.

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                • #9
                  The fitness I follow pretty closely. Yes.
                  Crohn's, doing SCD

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                  • #10
                    Many thanks for all the feedback. I can appreciate the desire to push beyond the boundaries that the Blueprint allows for. Further, I can see how many of you feel like you adhere to its spirit if not its letter.

                    Put plainly, though, I am wondering whether I would be best served to follow the Blueprint's specific regimen.

                    I like the idea of bodyweight exercises as an introduction to muscular training, but I fear that I will look back and consider this time as wasted for not having performed a more targeted program. I suppose that I have an idea of bodybuilding as involving deadlifts, bench presses, etc., and Mark's program does not call for that.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wieters View Post
                      Many thanks for all the feedback. I can appreciate the desire to push beyond the boundaries that the Blueprint allows for. Further, I can see how many of you feel like you adhere to its spirit if not its letter.

                      Put plainly, though, I am wondering whether I would be best served to follow the Blueprint's specific regimen.

                      I like the idea of bodyweight exercises as an introduction to muscular training, but I fear that I will look back and consider this time as wasted for not having performed a more targeted program. I suppose that I have an idea of bodybuilding as involving deadlifts, bench presses, etc., and Mark's program does not call for that.
                      Primal Blueprint Fitness is just one option for adhering to the Primal Blueprint Laws that relate to physical activity (Namely, Lift Heavy Things, Move Frequently at a Slow Pace, and Sprint once in a while). It was published after many or most of us started following the Primal Blueprint principles, and many of us are already at fitness levels sort of beyond what PB Fitness is aimed at.

                      It's definitely not a bodybuilding program. And it's not meant to be. It's meant to make you healthy and to help you look good naked. It's adequate for that. It's not really a strength program either. But for a sedentary population looking to increase their longevity with a minimum of time commitment, it's fine.

                      If you're interested in truly getting strong, do a barbell program. If you're interested in getting massive, do a barbell program, then figure out what bodybuilding protocol suits you once you're moderately strong. If you just want to live long and gain a modicum of muscle mass while losing extraneous adipose tissue, PB Fitness is easy, free to download (at least it was at one point) and adequate.

                      It's kind of like Mark's supplements. He provides them, but he doesn't push them as necessary. This isn't T-Nation. You can figure out how to LHT, sprint, and move frequently at a slow pace all on your own and be 100% in compliance with the Primal Blueprint Laws. You seem to have this confused. Hope I've helped clear it up.
                      The Champagne of Beards

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                      • #12
                        I did for a few months, its a great foundational program especially when you are eating fairly low carb, the main thing I got from his philosophy wast lift heavy a couple times a week, back off the long distance running, do sprints and don't over train (ie get adequate recovery). Its a program designed for lifetime fitness not sport specific training or body building. It got me fired up about weight training again for the first time in years and laid the foundation for what I do now which is more intense than he recommends.
                        Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                        https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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                        • #13
                          I'm fifty and was in no shape whatsoever. Started using the PB in mid-June and loved it. I've had to modify some in the last couple of weeks, since I have a chronic achilles tendonitis that cropped up from sprinting (and wow, how I loved the sprinting!) so I'm waiting until next spring probably to add that back in (am trying to supplement with cycling sprints but I need a better bike too).

                          Heat wave the last part of August put all but my walking/biking on hold for a bit -- hot muggy weather makes me want to do nothing at all, which is why I live in North Dakota now! But I'd made significant progress on LHT, to the point of doing several actual knee/hand pushups when holy crap, I could barely do five wall versions to start! All very new and very invigorating.

                          I may start weights when winter sets in, since I'm not exactly sure how my walking is going to work when it's -40F out.

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                          • #14
                            It won't be a waste of time. If anything, it will allow you to assess your current strength and set goals (such as getting the the highest level in each area). All programs are like that. Coming from a strictly running background, body-weight exercises are great to build strength and, as I said, assess what your strength is. Then, take it from there.
                            People too weak to follow their own dreams will always try to discourage others.

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                            • #15
                              I say start doing it, and modify as needed to suit your goals and abilities.
                              Crohn's, doing SCD

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