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Primal tendinitis remedy?

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  • Primal tendinitis remedy?



    I have written in some posts that I have difficulty to fully follow PB, concerning the "lifting heavy things" part, because of a nasty and persistent right-shoulder tendinitis that has been handicapping me for nearly 8 months now. My MD has not taken it seriously and given me some anti-inflammatory meds :-( for 15 days, without any positive consequence. I was hoping that a less inflammatory diet would help me to get rid of it but it seems to take a lot of time. I am trying to protect my shoulder from any strenuous effort, but I have not been able to not use it completely (even writing this post makes me use it, I am afraid)...

    I would really appreciate if you have some ideas for quickly getting rid of it, and becoming able again to lift some weights, and do my homework in the garden ;-)


    Regards,


    Murat


  • #2
    1



    I used to suffer from annoying things like not quite frozen shoulder,not quite carpal tunnel etc. The only short term thing I found to help much was direct application of ketoprofen or similar ointment, which reduces local inflammation.


    Long term these things have pretty much resolved through blood sugar control, connective tissue appears to become glycated by chronic high BG levels even before "diabetes" is diagnosed. Unfortunately they do take a long time to heal and I don't know many ways to improve on that, sorry! Sometimes massaging and *gently* using the affected part helps free it up, but overdoing it can worsen it rapidly.

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    • #3
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      Grok would have cut his offending arm off!

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      • #4
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        Cutting the shoulder part would probably have killed him, not a very efficient evolutionary strategy :-)


        Never using the arm was not either a real option for him probably, since the family had to eat some meat. I know that you can get rid of a tendinitis if you can immediately stop using the concerned member for some time (like a week if the injury is not too bad). Unfortunately, this was not possible for me at the time of this injury. Now, eight months later, I continue to live with this thing... I have even heard people loving so much their tendinitis that they keep them for years (please tell mine that I rather hate it ;-) ).


        @Trinkwasser: I have tried to gently using it but, it does not seem to like it much :-(


        Murat

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        • #5
          1



          Murat, have a look at this post - Looking for an ultimate one day meal to help with inflammation if your doctor has put you on anti-inflammatory meds and they are not working have another look at your diet and cut out anything that will cause inflamation, even though you have said this takes time it will be worth it.


          Not very primal but maybe also see a physiotherapist, they should be able to show you some exercises to help strengthen your rotator cuff.


          Ice packs can also help, 20 minutes max on the area a few times a day and that should bring some blood flow back into the shoulder.

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          • #6
            1



            Thanks a lot Miriam,

            I was following with a lot of interest, the post you mention. I will the the ice pack solution. Maybe it can help me. I can only see a physiotherapist if my MD sends me to him (otherwise, I must pay it from my pocket - the French system is trying to copy the UK one, now).

            I will also return to see my MD, but I am afraid that he will just give me more (and probably stronger) anti-inflammatory meds... I would rather prefer to avoid them.

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            • #7
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              I am a huge fan of physical therapists! I used to work for a huge seniors operation in Denver with over 1000 participants. The number of times someone came into our program in a wheelchair or using a walker with great difficulty only to not need them in six months is great.


              While physicians are an obviously important part of the healing arts, the PT's were the ones in the trenches.


              I, too, have a knee issue that won't go away. It first showed up in 1995, I think. An MRI didn't show anything that was of concern, too early. Most of the time since then I would just get a bolt of pain once in a rare while. Then suddenly a few weeks ago it is back with a vengeance! I even started using my double hinged knee brace on bad days, again. And some days are better, some worse, and it even varies within the day.


              Even w/o the pain bolts, everything is tender around the knee. Yet, I can walk several miles, no problem. And the pain is no different if I don't walk. I have tried aspirin and Naproxen (??)but no long term benefits. I might try the heat or cold packs.


              After all, when you live in America and don't get health benefits because you are taking care of family, and you are not 65 for Medicare (which is only 80/20 anyway), you are on your own.

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              • #8
                1



                Murat, I'm a big believer in trigger point therapy--a trigger point is a muscle that is referring pain to another spot. There are two great books by Clair Davies about how to work on your own trigger points: The Frozen Shoulder Workbook and The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook. This might not relate to your problem, but check it out and see. Trinkwasser's post about the effects of blood sugar control was very interesting also, wasn't it?

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                • #9
                  1



                  @Catalina, thanks a lot. There is a definitely some convergence between your post and Trinkwasser's one, since I read on the web site of the book you mention: "Frozen shoulder is most often observed in women between the ages of forty and sixty and in individuals with type-two diabetes, although a man or woman of any age may be afflicted." That indicates a correlation between this sympton and diabetes.


                  I have stopped taking sugar for nearly three years (except some very rare occasions like birthdays etc.) and my blood tests are very good for blood sugar. So, I am not sure that diabetes is a suspect in my case (but I am not a doctor).


                  The Frozen Shoulder Workbook seems very interesting! I will explore the web site and probably buy the book, since I do not see any other solution for now (I do not want to take steroids for instance). Thank you very much for pointing to it.


                  @OTB: I am sorry for you knee pain. I have also a small problem with my left knee and my MD is sending me to some reeducation. The echography (ERM in English? I am not sure, like with the pregnant mothers who can see their babies with this tool) has showed that my muscles are not completely arranged there as they should.


                  Best regards,


                  Murat

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                  • #10
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                    Thanks again Catalina. I have checked the web site of the book and the approach really looks promising. SO I have ordered both books from Amazon. I look forward to read them. I will keep you informed if it works.

                    Best regards,

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                    • #11
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                      Great, Murat! Do let me know how it goes. . .he really explains and illustrates things in a very user-friendly way, and a lot of it makes sense to me(like PB!). Check out the scalene section--ouch!

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                      • #12
                        1



                        Try not eating any tomatos, bell peppers and eggplant (nightshades) and see if that helps. You should see some relief within 2 weeks.


                        Also, checkout www.Wonderweight.com This little tool has helped me with my shoulder problems. I feel my shoulder getting stronger!

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                        • #13
                          1



                          First post, thought I would jump in, and I am sure it will not be popular...


                          In my practice, I have noticed something. Shoulder and arm pain is not usually caused by the shoulder or arm. Yes, I said it. Take a good look as to why, it really makes sense once you think about it.


                          The arms are appendages. They hang, they simply hang. Alter the anchoring point of the arms to the body through posture, and you affect the entire structure. Imaging hanging a hammock on a crooked tree, it hags wrong.


                          Treat the problem and not the symptom. the thoracic spine and the abdominal/visceral area being the problems. Remove the strain of the abdominals on the spine, and guide the vertebrae back into proper position, and the arms will hang more naturally and the pain will go down or disappear. Addressing the internal organs are obviously a huge component as well, since they will carry tension through the body creating a holding pattern.


                          It might seem far fetched, but my clients with frozen shoulders, carpal tunnel, rotator cuff strains all walk out with reduced pain, and increased movement, with very little treatment to the arms.

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                          • #14
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                            Thanks Jazz for this interesting holistic point of view. I think that being conscious about systematic issues is important. Can you tell us more about your approach to put the structure inline?


                            In my particular case, I am not convinced that the problem is systematic, at least concerning this specific tendinitis (my very first one by the way). In fact, I have not explained the cause of this injury, probably because I was ashamed since it definitely goes against the PB Law #9 (Avoid stupid mistakes):


                            Last summer we have adopted a Lab puppy. We have seen her mother and she was a very kind lab but the father "was not visible" at the moment of our visit to the family. Well, it seems there was a reason to it: our puppy seems to have some Patou (Pyrennean shepherd dog, gets more than 80 pounds when adult) genes and she was growing a lot more quickly than a lab... I have taken some time to register this simple fact. When I was playing Tug-of-War with my "six month old lab puppy" I have overlooked that she was now a 60 pounds beast and bang, I had a very hard pain in the shoulder. I have thought that it would go away naturally (second stupid mistake) and have not taken any care of it for six months (I was very busy, but this is a stupid excuse, I know). Now, I am afraid that it became permanent :-( Some friends have told me that a tendinitis can take two years to heal, but I am really tired of not being able to do any weight lift exercises and of this continuous ache as soon as I try to use my right shoulder, which is very common, since I am right-handed...


                            Sorry for this rather long post. This is my confession :-)

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                            • #15
                              1



                              I have tendinitis as well, from playing a musical instrument. I quit my musical occupation completely, over a year ago, did physical therapy, iced it frequently, did exercises for it, saw an Alexander Technique teacher, etc...


                              Nothing helped really except not using it. It still acts up sometimes, and definitely does when I'm ever stupid enough to pull out and play my instrument again!


                              I've heard that from friends as well, that it can take up to two to three years to heal (and that's if you actually let it heal, fully resting it from the problematic activities).


                              One thing I have done recently is start eating homemade bone broth. Supposedly the collagen/gelatin in it can be good for connective tissue, so I figure it can't hurt!

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