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  • #16
    Originally posted by jdmt View Post
    I hike 3-4 times a week and about once a month do a long 8-12 mile hike. I live in MT near Yellowstone so have many options. Otherwise I walk just about every day. These are my go to exercises as I do not to run at all. I figure the push on a steep elevation climb or switchbacks is equivilant to sprinting because it sure gets your heart racing.

    Footwear - summer my Tevas, winter my Vasques (which are still available). You can resole your vasques. Send them back to the company runs about $75.

    Jeanne

    Sent from my SCH-I925 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
    I love my Vasques, best hiking boots i ever bought. My wife and I hike almost every other week. We hit up Harriman State Park in NY. Soooooo many trails. We also snowshoe when we get the chance.

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    • #17
      I hike a lot. But hiking is what ultimately ruined me and set me toward a paleo lifestyle to cure what broke. I hiked too much. Long distance backpacking is what really floats my boat. I hiked 3000+ miles in two summers on a poor diet and ended up here. I also ruined my feet hiking some of those miles in supportive trail running shoes. So hiking also led me to minimalist footwear. I now hike in New Balance Minimus 730 (really cheap, way more minimal than they appear). I also know many other long distance hikers who prefer minimalist hiking shoes (Altra Lone Peaks seem to be quite popular) and several who also adhere to a primal or close-to-primal diet. I just came back from a two-week traverse of Glacier National park. A short hike of 120 miles or so. I think a backpack trip needs to be about 500 miles to feel like I'm really settling into the swing of things. 1000 miles is about long enough. Some day I'll try to do a full 2500 or so and see if I can hack it.



      In all honesty, most hikers end up sort of doughy and flabby the more they hike, especially the long distance hikers. You might find this article interesting. It was part of what helped me figure out why so much hiking ruined me. Not that it's 100% the right reason or cure, but it was a clue that got me here.
      Why Hikers Get Fat
      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
        I hike a lot. But hiking is what ultimately ruined me and set me toward a paleo lifestyle to cure what broke. I hiked too much. Long distance backpacking is what really floats my boat. I hiked 3000+ miles in two summers on a poor diet and ended up here. I also ruined my feet hiking some of those miles in supportive trail running shoes. So hiking also led me to minimalist footwear. I now hike in New Balance Minimus 730 (really cheap, way more minimal than they appear). I also know many other long distance hikers who prefer minimalist hiking shoes (Altra Lone Peaks seem to be quite popular) and several who also adhere to a primal or close-to-primal diet. I just came back from a two-week traverse of Glacier National park. A short hike of 120 miles or so. I think a backpack trip needs to be about 500 miles to feel like I'm really settling into the swing of things. 1000 miles is about long enough. Some day I'll try to do a full 2500 or so and see if I can hack it.



        In all honesty, most hikers end up sort of doughy and flabby the more they hike, especially the long distance hikers. You might find this article interesting. It was part of what helped me figure out why so much hiking ruined me. Not that it's 100% the right reason or cure, but it was a clue that got me here.
        Why Hikers Get Fat
        My husband wants me to do long backpacking trips like this with him. I've never made it past a treeline by much!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by moluv View Post
          My husband wants me to do long backpacking trips like this with him. I've never made it past a treeline by much!
          The nice thing about Glacier (also about the Pacific Northwest in general) is that you can get above treeline around 6000 feet or so. You won't be struggling with altitude at such a low elevation. In California you have to get to about 11,000 feet to get above the trees.

          You ought to give backpacking a try sometime. You might just find out that you like it. To make it more enjoyable, go to Backpacking Light and learn how to lighten the load. Having a heavy pack and boots giving you blisters takes all the fun out of it. You don't have to go to all the extremes people discuss there, but every little bit helps.
          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
            Great info and enjoying the article sbhikes. I wondered how your Glacier trek went; looks like your back held up

            LOVE THE FANTASTIC PIC -

            “you aren't what you eat - you are what you don't poop.” Wavy Gravy

            Today I am Fillyjonk. Tommorow I will be Snufkin.

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            • #21
              Awesome pic, great hiking experience. I'm in awe.
              Annie Ups the Ante
              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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              • #22
                Today was my hiking anniversary. I had an awesome day up on the slopes in the sunshine, dragging my feet out of thigh deep snow, and generally having a great time.
                Last edited by Annieh; 09-02-2013, 11:08 PM.
                Annie Ups the Ante
                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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                • #23
                  Wow, that's beautiful!
                  Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                  • #24
                    If you haven't yet check out the movie The Way with Martin Sheen. It takes place on the Camino de Santiago in Spain. It's pilgrimage me and wifey have in our Bucket List.

                    The movie was pretty good.

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                    • #25
                      This past year my wife and I have divided our hiking time between the Delaware Water Gap area and Schooley's Mnt Park. We may be on the trail anywhere from 1.5 to 5 hours. We've found that this is a great way to reduce stress that helps bring my wife's BS down. Although...

                      ...there was that time at the gap that we came up behind mama bear and 2 good sized cubs. This was 4hrs into a 4.5hr hike and we were pretty beat at this point. I didn't spot them until we were no more than 50yds away. A bit closer than I care to be. Either they didn't see us or just didn't care, but they finally wandered off the trail and down the mountain, thankfully in the opposite direction we were heading. While OUR stress levels jumped a few notches, I figure the bears in that area are probably used to seeing humans from time to time and were unconcerned about our presence.

                      I always thought walking sticks were kind of hokey, but to make a long story short, I thought my wife may find benefit. On our last trip to Maine, we stopped at Beans and picked up a pair. She didn't want to use two so we each use one. To my surprise I have found them helpful, even if only as a confidence booster. It sure has helped my wife a great deal. She has back and hip issues and probably shouldn't be out there at all. I usually have to help her up and down the big rock steps, but she's been doing so much better on her own with the stick.

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                      • #26
                        I hike with two hiking poles. I have Gossamer Gear trekking poles. They weigh almost nothing. I hardly use them at all so their light weight means even though I'm mostly carrying them, it's not a bother. They are very useful for when you are hiking along and have to cross a log over a creek or there's a downhill with some slippery scree or something. I also use them to set up my tent. I used two trekking poles the entire time along the PCT but I felt that I became too dependent upon them. So they do have a downside.
                        Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                        • #27
                          We found them handy recently for crossing streams. We're using Black Diamond poles. 8oz each is pretty darned light I think. I was leery about collapsible poles, but only the top tier on this pair is subject to telescoping together, which hasn't happened to us yet. I like the fact that I can fold it up and attach to the back pack if I want.

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                          • #28
                            My wife and I have recently gotten into hiking (this past year) and have averaged about 10miles each weekend.

                            We have a trip to Colorado this october (first full week, 6th-13th) we plan to take in as many miles as possible, shooting for 60+ for the week.

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                            • #29
                              I am also an avid hiker. FWIW, I don't have a problem with people being vegan or vegetarian. I think that any whole foods based diet is hella healthier than the SAD which is why whether someone is eating vegan, Mediterranean, anti-inflammatory, Okinawa or paleo they all seem to have improved health. I firmly believe our biggest enemies are all the crap that goes into processed foods- avoid those, and you'll see health benefits. Anyway, moving back to topic- I hike frequently and have begun backpacking again after about a 10 year hiatus. I've transitioned to a lighter style of backpacking, taking tips from UL backpacking forums. I'm not UL and probably won't ever be because even in summer our night time temps in Alaska can drop to near freezing. But my pack consistently weighs about 25 lbs fully loaded (including all my consumables and a bear canister). It beats the heck out of the 50 lb packs I used to carry. Most of my trips are in the treeless alpine areas of Alaska- treeline here is about 3000' feet or so, so you don't have to go very high before you're up out of the trees. The views are great. I've got a trip scheduled for this weekend, actually.
                              High Weight: 225
                              Weight at start of Primal: 189
                              Current Weight: 174
                              Goal Weight: 130

                              Primal Start Date: 11/26/2012

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                                I hike a lot. But hiking is what ultimately ruined me and set me toward a paleo lifestyle to cure what broke. I hiked too much. Long distance backpacking is what really floats my boat. I hiked 3000+ miles in two summers on a poor diet and ended up here. I also ruined my feet hiking some of those miles in supportive trail running shoes. So hiking also led me to minimalist footwear. I now hike in New Balance Minimus 730 (really cheap, way more minimal than they appear). I also know many other long distance hikers who prefer minimalist hiking shoes (Altra Lone Peaks seem to be quite popular) and several who also adhere to a primal or close-to-primal diet. I just came back from a two-week traverse of Glacier National park. A short hike of 120 miles or so. I think a backpack trip needs to be about 500 miles to feel like I'm really settling into the swing of things. 1000 miles is about long enough. Some day I'll try to do a full 2500 or so and see if I can hack it.

                                I recognize that trail. It's Glacier. Heading there in two weeks. I will have to check into the New Balance footwear. Sounds more appealing to me than what is currently popular and has kept me in what I hike in now.

                                Just bought an ultralight tent from Big Agnes to cut down on backpack weight.

                                I will have to check out the article because we all know it's tough packing foodwise for backpacking

                                Jeanne

                                Sent from my SCH-I925 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

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