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  • Article on running

    Long-distance running and evolution: Why humans can outrun horses but can’t jump higher than cats. - Slate Magazine

    Interesting:

    The answer, argue Lieberman and Bramble, is that snares, nets, and really effective projectile weapons, such as the bow and arrow, were probably invented by Homo sapiens—modern humans. There's no evidence that early Stone Age hunters had weapons much better than sharp sticks. Such armaments would have required them to kill prey animals at close quarters, where they would have been at high risk of getting fatally gored, bitten, or kicked. Thus, they probably obtained meat mainly via "persistence hunting"—chasing an antelope, for instance, until it was nearly keeling over with heat exhaustion—and scavenging. The latter was very much a running game: When distant, circling vultures tipped them off about a lion kill, they had to get there before hyenas, which strip everything edible from carcasses. And they typically could only outrace hyenas in the hot sun. As a result, they carved out a new carnivore niche: the hot-day meat chaser.

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  • #2
    They had to arrive at the kill early to get meat, at which point they would have been fighting other scavengers for prime cuts. But to get skulls and long bones they could wait until the other scavengers had stripped the carcass bare and abandoned it. That's where the brains and marrow were to be found.

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    • #3
      Interesting article! Another bit that I thought was cool:

      Elaborating on this idea, Mark Mattson, a neuroscientist at the National Institute on Aging, has proposed that our kind evolved superior smarts partly because they helped us record and recall the complex details we encountered when running after food—landmarks, tracking clues, location of water sources, and so on. The fact that endurance exercise is known to stimulate neuronal growth in the brain’s memory-forming hippocampus suggests he's right. A related recent study also suggests that natural selection endowed us with the ability to experience the “runner's high,” wiring the brain so that endurance exercise lights up its "endocannabinoid" system in a pleasurable way to reinforce a tendency toward high-intensity running.
      But, but, chronic cardio is bad, mmmkay?

      This probably means that people shouldn't do 10-mile runs with their dog in the heat. Not nice to the dog.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by diene View Post
        Interesting article! Another bit that I thought was cool:



        But, but, chronic cardio is bad, mmmkay?

        This probably means that people shouldn't do 10-mile runs with their dog in the heat. Not nice to the dog.
        It refers to how often one would run. Several times a week is obviously not good, but once every week or two in the name of lunch seems pretty benign, considering going hungry would be the alternative.
        "All of God's creatures have a natural habitat... my dinner plate." -Me

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        • #5
          You have to remember that these runs were not max effort, they were slow and long over several miles. That is where humans excel; we can sweat, animals have to pant and can only breath in between strides as they have 4 legs that compress their bodies when they run. We are actually designed to run very long distances at very slow pace i.e. Not chronic cardio.

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          • #6
            How slow is slow? I mean, it's still running. They're not walking after prey.

            What would you say a very slow pace is? Between 6 and 6.5 mph? That's approximately my pace when I do leisurely long runs.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by diene View Post
              How slow is slow? I mean, it's still running. They're not walking after prey.

              What would you say a very slow pace is? Between 6 and 6.5 mph? That's approximately my pace when I do leisurely long runs.
              About this fast: Human Mammal, Human Hunter - Attenborough - Life of Mammals - BBC - YouTube

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              • #8
                Cool video. Can't tell how fast he's going though.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by magnolia1973 View Post
                  the hot-day meat chaser.
                  Hmm. My mind went to the gutter.
                  Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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