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  • #31
    Originally posted by canuck416 View Post
    Yeah, wrestled 148 how about you?

    It's a great sport, set the foundation for many of my athletic adventures from running to weight training. I remember we used to go for 3 to 6 mile runs several times a week and people use to throw beer bottles at us and call us fags (yeah people used to drink and drive back in the late 60's). We used to have these fund raisers called walk-a-thons to raise money for cancer etc. One was a walk of about 27 miles , the wrestling team said hell we'll just run it! Ha Ha ... when I got home and in the bath tub I totally seized up and my dad had to come in and help me out of the tub!
    Graduated high school wrestling 125 and went to 134 class for college. Excellent sport, and definitely laid the groundwork for my lifelong interest in health and fitness. But it wasn't back in the 60's for me

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    • #32
      when I got home and in the bath tub I totally seized up and my dad had to come in and help me out of the tub!
      One roadblock to fitness for me.

      That, and I have no idea what most of this thread means. It sounds like, "Today I raised three throwdowns in the back with a 140 and doubled my ups to make a set." And I wish I knew what any of it meant. Is there a class at college that explains all of this?
      Crohn's, doing SCD

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
        One roadblock to fitness for me.

        That, and I have no idea what most of this thread means. It sounds like, "Today I raised three throwdowns in the back with a 140 and doubled my ups to make a set." And I wish I knew what any of it meant. Is there a class at college that explains all of this?
        s=Ix(1/t)

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        • #34
          Wee.... posting my workout in the WOD thread, but it was pretty intense. Been a long time since I've done a split or isolation work. So it's a cool way to change things up and still stick with the HIT principles I've grown fond of. New stuff was the "pre-exhaust" work. I love this concept for training my chest especially. A ruptured pec tendon a few years back makes me uneasy about super heavy's on the bench. So I hit the pec deck with a weight I can hit near 10 reps at failure for.... then straight to the press without rest. I only could use 140lbs and got 3 slow good reps before I caved. Very effective for taking muscle to total momentary fatigue.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
            One roadblock to fitness for me.

            That, and I have no idea what most of this thread means. It sounds like, "Today I raised three throwdowns in the back with a 140 and doubled my ups to make a set." And I wish I knew what any of it meant. Is there a class at college that explains all of this?
            HIT (high intensity training) has its own lingo. Honestly there should be a freaking dictionary for it. Drop sets, pre-exhaust, inroading, outroading, ect. All a bunch of goofy terms when the end product and all you really gotta know is "intensity" thats it. Push yourself till its really reeeeeeaaallly hard. The end.

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            • #36
              Today I picked up a big rock. Over and over, pushing it up above my head and squatting with it until I couldn't do it anymore. How does that translate?
              Crohn's, doing SCD

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                Today I picked up a big rock. Over and over, pushing it up above my head and squatting with it until I couldn't do it anymore. How does that translate?
                Sound like a single superset or complex of overhead rock press and rock squats? And since you did not have Art Jones present to scare you enough to go way beyond failure it would not really count as HIT...
                "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                - Schopenhauer

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                • #38
                  Alright, I'll get out there and do it again, until I fall over! And then I'll megadose baking soda, magnesium and potassium to my legs don't turn to stone, lol.

                  Scratch that. I want to do my chin-ups on the playground!

                  As for the OT, is this more a question of scientifically what the body can stand, what's best for size gains or strength gains, or what works best for each person in their own life as demands vary?
                  Crohn's, doing SCD

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                    Alright, I'll get out there and do it again, until I fall over! And then I'll megadose baking soda, magnesium and potassium to my legs don't turn to stone, lol.

                    Scratch that. I want to do my chin-ups on the playground!

                    As for the OT, is this more a question of scientifically what the body can stand, what's best for size gains or strength gains, or what works best for each person in their own life as demands vary?
                    What you did.... if you could do no more.... counts as "high intensity" in my book.

                    If I had to call it anything I'd call it an exercise philosophy with solid scientific backing. My favorite guy for this is Drew. Very cool about how to incorporate the ideas into bodyweight work too:

                    Here is the basic "what is this" page What is HIT? | High Intensity Training by Drew Baye

                    "General Guidelines for High Intensity Training

                    The following are general guidelines for high intensity training. Keep in mind the specific volume and frequency of training and exercise selection should be modified to suit the individual, based on level of conditioning, response to exercise, and goals.

                    Training Frequency: Beginners should perform no more than three workouts per week on non-consecutive days. Advanced trainees should work out less frequently, not more.

                    Training Volume: Perform between two and twelve exercises addressing all major muscle groups. If a higher number is performed, limit the total number of compound movements to no more than half.

                    Number of Sets: Perform only one set per exercise.

                    Number of Repetitions: A wide range of repetitions can be effective.

                    Progression: Increase the resistance used during an exercise by approximately 5 percent whenever you are able to complete the highest number of your repetition range in strict form.

                    Repetition Speed: Move slowly enough to maintain strict control over the movement and to be able to reverse direction smoothly. Avoid fast, jerky movements.

                    Range of Motion: Use a full range of joint movement."
                    Last edited by Neckhammer; 08-12-2013, 12:56 PM.

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                    • #40
                      Trying a fun little experiment starting this afternoon ...I'm switching up my current workout to a 3 Day per week muscle endurance program for a couple of weeks (light weights very high reps). I like to shock the system every once in awhile, hit the muscles in a different way with a different form of intensity.

                      Here's what I'm planning:

                      2 Circuits (30 second rest between exercises - 2 minute rest between circuits)

                      50 Squats - 135 lbs.
                      40 Bench Presses - 135 lbs.
                      20 Pull-ups - Bodyweight
                      20 Dips - Body weight
                      20 Seated Pulley Row - 130 lbs.
                      30 Calf Raises - 200 lbs.
                      50 Sit-ups
                      50 Hyper-extensions
                      Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                      https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by canuck416 View Post
                        Trying a fun little experiment starting this afternoon ...I'm switching up my current workout to a 3 Day per week muscle endurance program for a couple of weeks (light weights very high reps). I like to shock the system every once in awhile, hit the muscles in a different way with a different form of intensity.

                        Here's what I'm planning:

                        2 Circuits (30 second rest between exercises - 2 minute rest between circuits)

                        50 Squats - 135 lbs.
                        40 Bench Presses - 135 lbs.
                        20 Pull-ups - Bodyweight
                        20 Dips - Body weight
                        20 Seated Pulley Row - 130 lbs.
                        30 Calf Raises - 200 lbs.
                        50 Sit-ups
                        50 Hyper-extensions
                        Looks interesting. I would have trouble with the squats and perhaps even the hyper-extensions in that program. Let us know how it goes for you!

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                          Alright, I'll get out there and do it again, until I fall over! And then I'll megadose baking soda, magnesium and potassium to my legs don't turn to stone, lol.

                          Scratch that. I want to do my chin-ups on the playground!

                          As for the OT, is this more a question of scientifically what the body can stand, what's best for size gains or strength gains, or what works best for each person in their own life as demands vary?
                          Neckhammer posted great info. I could be wrong, but I'll bet Gorbag like Pavel Tsatsouline's concepts.

                          He preaches the rule of 10 reps. Focus on sets of 2 -3 reps but in all cases so not exceed 10 reps per exercise. Always leave 1 -2 reps in the "bank".

                          5 -7 seven reps appears to be the magic number that makes the difference between strength gains and strength with Hypertrophy but I'll be that is up to dispute.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by canuck416 View Post
                            Trying a fun little experiment starting this afternoon ...I'm switching up my current workout to a 3 Day per week muscle endurance program for a couple of weeks (light weights very high reps). I like to shock the system every once in awhile, hit the muscles in a different way with a different form of intensity.

                            Here's what I'm planning:

                            2 Circuits (30 second rest between exercises - 2 minute rest between circuits)

                            50 Squats - 135 lbs.
                            40 Bench Presses - 135 lbs.
                            20 Pull-ups - Bodyweight
                            20 Dips - Body weight
                            20 Seated Pulley Row - 130 lbs.
                            30 Calf Raises - 200 lbs.
                            50 Sit-ups
                            50 Hyper-extensions
                            That would be cardiac arrest for me.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                              Looks interesting. I would have trouble with the squats and perhaps even the hyper-extensions in that program. Let us know how it goes for you!
                              Well boys I got through the first set barely, the second set I had to cut the reps in half on the squats, bench and pull-ups. It'll take me a couple of weeks until I can build up and get through the workout doing 2 complete circuits, but I'll eventually get it done.
                              Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                              https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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                              • #45
                                When you look at the works of Ross and Tsatsouline... since they both work with athletes... they talk about using strength training to get stronger, but not going to fatigue and training for your sport.

                                Do you think not going to fatigue requires training for the other sport as part of the catalyst to getting stronger or can you do it with resistance training alone and avoid going to fatigue? Fatigue is defined as not having good form on your final rep... not lying on the floor wishing you could move.

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